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Law degrees and being a lawyer is 100% overrated watch

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    (Original post by barristertobe91)
    Haha! I get what you're saying but I don't agree! Being overrated is a subjective idea- law degrees are (rightly or wrongly) impressive! For the most part good unis ask for AAA or above, law degrees teach students analysis, attention to detail, reasoning etc etc that is useful to so many other careers. In that sense, it's not overrated. I understand what you're saying though and maybe too many students assume that if they do a law degree, they will have their ideal careers guaranteed!

    A lottery? I don't think so, it's just difficult. If you have a first from Oxbridge/a Russell Group/Red Brick uni, work experience etc etc and you're a solid candidate then you have a very good chance of making it into the City. If you're less impressive (as I am- I got a 2.1 from a RG/RB uni) then yes it's less likely but it's not a ridiculous gamble. Like anything else, surely, the very very best candidates succeed and, I'm sure if you asked them their thoughts on studying law they wouldn't say it was overrated.
    'Lottery' may have been hyperbole, but what I'm really saying is that even having 'the whole package' is no longer sufficient to allow you to be confident about getting a job at a good City firm - there are enough people of high enough calibre to practically make having it all a prerequisite nowadays, rather than anything which will distinguish you. It's never been easy to get a job in the City, but it has progressively become more of a numbers game. Another factor which makes applications a bit of a gamble is 'fit'. It is pretty difficult to meet enough people from enough firms to find 20 firms for whom you could confidently say you'd be a good 'fit' as a person and who tick all your boxes for practice strengths and whatever else. Usually it's more a case of applying to 20 firms which have the characteristics you're looking for (if you can find that many) and hoping that, out of the ones which decide to interview you, there's at least one which decides you'd fit in (and that you do well at that interview).

    It's only after my friends have started securing TCs at top firms despite being confusingly rejected by 'lesser' entities that I've started to really consider the extent to which 'fit' might guide the process, rather than just your capabilities as most students tend to assume.
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    (Original post by Sanctimonious)
    Because prestige is becoming less and less important by the day. One of my good friends just graduated from London Met and is now working with one of the biggest financial firms in the world.
    Does their work at "one of the biggest financial firms" involve mopping up floors?
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    Places like Freshfields (one of the top magic circle firms) recruit around 40% of their graduates from Oxbridge, followed by the London Universities- UCL/LSE etc.. then Warwick, Durham, then Manchester, Nottingham, York, Bristol etc.. But securing a training contract is mostly based on interviews, so those coming from Oxbridge are obviously going to be better at interviewing because they had to interview to get into Uni.

    So landing a good job at a well regarded firm is not entirely based on which Uni you go to, so long as you get at least a 2:1, or preferably a first.

    As for the legal career being over rated- that depends on the person and the nature of their work; some people may find Law an intellectually stimulating and rewarding career, where as others may find it dull, tedious and repetitive.

    Law degrees are also an entirely personal choice- many see them as more well regarded and believe that gaining a strong grounding in the subject of law leads to a better lawyer. However, other people would argue that studying another subject before converting to Law leads to a more well rounded and interesting individual, with a wider skill set and therefore better future prospects- however this route is more expensive.

    At the end of the day, as a lawyer at a big city firm you will probably end up spending a lot of time travelling around the country with colleagues. This leads to the question, would you rather spend that time discussing contracts or legal issues etc.. or engaging in debates about Shakespeare and Continental drift? Studying an alternative degree before a law degree provides a chance to explore your interests at an academic level before settling on a particular career path.
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    yeah, after finishing uni you'll realize the real world is not what it seems to be...so much expectation and hope but then you realize you're just another guy working 8 hours a day earning 21000 a year...i just graduated.....

    but i'm doing a msc urban economic development this sept so hopefully it will get better in the future, although most people start careers at the age of 21 now, the dream job or big paycheck doesnt really come along until youre 30
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    Late to the party here, but I know a few people doing Law at my university (Salford), and I always feel a bit weird about it. I know they'll probably end up teaching A-Level Law at the Manchester college or something, and not working in actual Law.
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    (Original post by ldsbabe)
    Late to the party here, but I know a few people doing Law at my university (Salford), and I always feel a bit weird about it. I know they'll probably end up teaching A-Level Law at the Manchester college or something, and not working in actual Law.
    Why do you feel weird that they're doing Law? LOL


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    (Original post by einnap101)
    Why do you feel weird that they're doing Law? LOL


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    Because I would hate to tell them that they're never going to make it into the magic circle or probably even to practice law at a decent level...but it's true.
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    (Original post by ldsbabe)
    Because I would hate to tell them that they're never going to make it into the magic circle or probably even to practice law at a decent level...but it's true.
    How do you know they even want to practice law? Who says YOU have to tell them anything? How do you know they won't become a decent lawyer? All these assumptions, why don't you just concentrate on yourself


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    (Original post by einnap101)
    How do you know they even want to practice law? Who says YOU have to tell them anything? How do you know they won't become a decent lawyer? All these assumptions, why don't you just concentrate on yourself


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    Why don't you concentrate on YOURSELF? Did you read the title of the thread? Girl, bye.
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    (Original post by ldsbabe)
    Because I would hate to tell them that they're never going to make it into the magic circle or probably even to practice law at a decent level...but it's true.
    Well, maybe they don't have those plans. Anyone who goes to Salford thinking of magic circle hasn't done their research properly and has what's coming.
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    Law is a closed shop unionised trade. On the one hand that means outsized salaries for the few who get tapped, but on the other it means there are far fewer jobs than people willing and able to do them. You can't have one without the other. There's no intrinsic reason a lawyer should earn more than an engineer.
 
 
 
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