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    (Original post by ZeroIgnition)
    Wow, I'm in the complete opposite situation as you. Got into Queen Mary for biology with BBD (the D in Biology).
    And really questioning whether this is right for me.....
    Sorry can I just ask, did you apply to the course through clearing or it was your firm/insurance?
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    (Original post by katearch)
    I thought this wasn't about which subjects are better, I thought this was about whether prestige matters in terms of having a career in politics? Short answer, yes it does.

    I'm just going to un-watch this thread now as it's getting a little volatile and off-topic...
    katearch, I was just thinking what a sweet poster you were! A pity. Not too many of those around on the TSR.
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    (Original post by Mansun)
    Fine, go to an ex-poly, it ain't my problem. It will stay with you forever. I don't think you will be the next Barrack Obama at such a low profile university. And it will be harder to get onto MA and PhD programmes and better unis in future.
    It's not quite an ex-poly but gets bashed a lot; I did my undergraduate degree with the Open University (mainly because I was too ill at the time to attend a regular university) but I went onto to do a Master's at Cambridge (yes Cambridge University) and now having just graduated from there I'm going onto UPenn for further study (one of the Ivy League schools). Whilst obviously it's not an ex poly and there were rather exceptional circumstances to explain why I did my degree with them, the open university often gets disregarded by so called elitists e.g. I got turned down by a number of 'top universities' because they felt the OU degree wasn't rigorous enough to demonstrate I'd be capable of postgraduate study. Not to worry.


    The point is your university may not necessarily drag you down if you perform well academically and back it up with other factors e.g. Extra curricular etc.
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    (Original post by Cameron10)
    I had the choice of Kent or Brookes to do Politics and History and I chose Oxford Brookes in the end, mainly because of it's location, the fact that it wasn't in the middle of nowhere, had a good emphasis on transferable skills to the workplace, for instance the history course gives me a chance to go on a placement at a school/museum etc, while Sussex and Kent don't. and it was near all the major cities in the country.

    For me having experience is crucial more than good academic qualifications. Which is funny considering I got A*AB at A level.

    But a part of me feels like I should go to somewhere really prestigious, so that my good grades worked for something, but I had a very specific choice of university in mind, i.e had to be near London, not to have too much emphasis on exams, and good work experience opportunities.

    So in that respect, it only left Brookes, Kent and Sussex to compete

    Sussex currently has vacancies for Politics and History am I am tempted, the course looks better too, but the university seems to have a strong left wing political culture, which might make me feel uncomfortable given my views. Plus it doesn't have the work-based emphasis like Brookes and isn't near all the major cities, just London.

    I just feel like because I'm going to an ex-poly I am selling myself short, but another part of me just tells me to grow up, and it doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do there that matters to employers. My best mate got A*A*A for A level and he is going to Swansea, again like my course asking for BBC.

    Is it bad that despite being someone who is good academically, I want to go to a university where it's practice for working life, rather than pure prestige?
    No offence but citing the supposed political leanings of a university as a reason not attend it is a bit silly given that makes no difference whatsoever to the teaching of your course. Even if the university is considered left wing I doubt you will feel isolated or left out and I bet Sussex uni must have a conservatives society.

    It seems you're more focussed on the placement aspect of the course so I guess the course at Brookes might be better for you. But if you did say go to a Russell group university or a more 'prestigious university' like you said, would it really be impossible to organise decent placements or internships in the holidays etc?

    Also you need to ascertain whether these universities would accept you if you did decide to reapply next year as A*AB wouldn't necessarily fulfil an AAA offer unless they made offers based on UCAS points. Also in the unlikely event you were not made an offer by a 'better' university then you would have wasted a year you could have spent at Brookes, getting good grades, working on your CV, networking etc.

    I would say research the places you might want to apply to and find out if they would accept you for next year before deciding to give up on the Brookes offer.
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    Recycling an old post here but:

    Attachment 174918
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    Not many ex-polys targeted by the top 100 employers!

    http://studenttimes.org/article/news...e#.U_ABSfldXD8

    Page 31:-

    http://www.highfliers.co.uk/download/GMReport14.pdf
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    (Original post by Mansun)
    Not many ex-polys targeted by the top 100 employers!

    http://studenttimes.org/article/news...e#.U_ABSfldXD8

    Page 31:-

    http://www.highfliers.co.uk/download/GMReport14.pdf
    Please; this nonsense comes out every year.

    The methodology starts by asking final year students:

    "Which employer do you think offers the best opportunities for graduates?"

    Obviously they aren't going to mention Sproggins Sprockets because they won't have heard of Sproggins Sprockets until they see an ad for a graduate entry post there. Leaving that aside, the question is about as valid as asking a student which employer has the best cream cakes in the staff canteen.

    Having found 100 employers by the age old method of the blind leading the blind, Highflyers then asks those employers about their graduate recruitment.

    Here is a summary

    http://www.highfliers.co.uk/download/GMReview14.pdf

    They don't comment on the key statistic; that the average number of graduate vacancies amongst these 100 employers is 190.

    100 x 190 = 19,000

    So of the approximately 660,000 first and postgraduate degree graduates last year, these so called top 100 employers hire fewer than 3% of them.

    Do not give this rubbish any semblance of authority.
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    (Original post by AR_95)
    "it doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do there that matters to employers"


    This. Oh and experience too
    Is that quote taken from Bane himself? :lolwut:

    ''It doesn't matter who we are, what matters is our plan.'' :laugh:
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    No, if you feel Oxford Brookes is the best choice for you then the mistake would be if you chose to go to a lesser-suited uni just because it's higher up on a league table.

    There's a lot of people, particularly on this forum, who view league tables as a definitive preference order for choosing a uni and that everyone should just pick the highest one they can get. But the problem with that is it fails to take into account that universities aren't all the same and there are so many other factors that could make certain unis a good or bad match for you personally that league tables obviously can't take into account. Going to a "top" uni doesn't guarantee you a good job or even a job at all and going to a "rubbish" uni doesn't doom you to a bad/no job, so why make it such a big part of your decision making process?

    If you don't want to spend 3 years living in the middle of nowhere then don't, if you don't want to be somewhere with a strong left wing political culture then don't. I ruled out a few unis because were all traditional old buildings or looked like schools and I feel more inspired by modern/professional environments. If it's important to you, even if only a little, then it should be considered in your decision-making process.
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    (Original post by StacFace)
    Going to a "top" uni doesn't guarantee you a good job or even a job at all and going to a "rubbish" uni doesn't doom you to a bad/no job, so why make it such a big part of your decision making process?
    Just to play devils advocate for the moment...

    Why should an able person, capable of say AAA, work hard to achieve those grades and enrol on a competitive course at a so-called ''top'' university when they can cruise through with CCC onto the same course at a different university?

    What is the point of doing well if it confers virtually no advantage to them? How might people feel if they realise they worked hard for nothing? What kind of example does this set for society?
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    (Original post by Farseer)
    Just to play devils advocate for the moment...

    Why should an able person, capable of say AAA, work hard to achieve those grades and enrol on a competitive course at a so-called ''top'' university when they can cruise through with CCC onto the same course at a different university?

    What is the point of doing well if it confers virtually no advantage to them? How might people feel if they realise they worked hard for nothing? What kind of example does this set for society?
    Your misunderstanding is the assumption is that the labour market should be some sort of prize for academic achievement. It isn't, it never has been and there is no reason why it should be.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Your misunderstanding is the assumption is that the labour market should be some sort of prize for academic achievement. It isn't, it never has been and there is no reason why it should be.
    So what is the prize for academic achievement? Are we wasting our time in trying to improve our employment prospects through university education?
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    (Original post by Farseer)
    So what is the prize for academic achievement? Are we wasting our time in trying to improve our employment prospects through university education?
    The prize for academic achievement is a certificate.

    Some, many, of you are wasting your time trying to improve your employment prospects through university education.

    However, no-one can give you a list of which of you are and which of you aren't.
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    (Original post by Farseer)
    Just to play devils advocate for the moment...

    Why should an able person, capable of say AAA, work hard to achieve those grades and enrol on a competitive course at a so-called ''top'' university when they can cruise through with CCC onto the same course at a different university?

    What is the point of doing well if it confers virtually no advantage to them? How might people feel if they realise they worked hard for nothing? What kind of example does this set for society?
    Because just like that AAA won't erase their GCSE grades, their degree classification won't erase that AAA. They've already committed 2 years to their college and subjects and the small sacrifice of a few extra weeks revision means they have a lot more doors open should they ever need them.

    They should go to the "top" uni because they've considered everything important to them and that comes out top for them personally. If it doesn't then they shouldn't go there and they should go to the "lesser" uni that is higher up on their personal league table with their AAA.

    Higher grades should be used to open more doors and give you a wider choice, not to alter the doors opened so that you feel the need to lower your performance to get where you really want to be. That's just silly.
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    (Original post by StacFace)
    Because just like that AAA won't erase their GCSE grades, their degree classification won't erase that AAA.
    No-one is condemned to poor employment or a dreary life just because of their GCSE or A level results. Although many of you wont realise this right now, once you have your degree, even that ceases to matter after your first couple of jobs. In 10 years time no-one will even look at your degree/University on your CV. They will be far more interested in what you've done since. Your A levels? They wont even be on your CV.
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    (Original post by katearch)
    Just to add, Manchester is prestigious, it's been around a lot longer than some of these modern universities. It's also higher up than Durham on international league tables. If you're interested in international politics, it's well worth checking out the THE world rankings for an idea of which universities are prestigious internationally, not just in the UK.

    Really , since when does age = prestige ?

    If so then Aberdeen and Glasgow would be top 10 but they are not and never have been.

    Exeter. York, Warwick, Bath, Surrey and UEA are all post war universities and all have ranked higher than Manchester for a decade or so.
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    (Original post by katearch)
    @TheWaffle not sure where I'm staying yet, thanks for the tip!

    @godd I'm just using this as an example when I went to do work experience at an advertising firm, they said they will only employ you even for a basic level job if you have a 1st class degree in a 'real' subject (history, maths, english etc). All of their Chief Executive Officers and directors have 1sts from either Ivy League or Russell Group universities.
    As a senior director with a social science degree from a Poly (not even ex-Poly it was so long ago) I am proof that this isn't always the case! However, more people have degrees these days and the market is more competitive. I would look for a 2.1 in a 'real' subject when employing people but don't care too much which school. To make SVP these days then it is an MBA that matter.
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    (Original post by mrkl)
    Really , since when does age = prestige ?
    Totally agree. The idea of 'prestige' is something that obsesses 17 year olds - mainly because they think this is is a 'easy' way to pick a University, without needing them to think beyond this. Instead of thinking, Why am I going to Uni at all? Isn't the course content a more important consideration? they use something similar to arguing about the 'quality' of Football teams to decide where they should apply.

    Most of the Unis that were either Polytechnics or HE colleges etc before obtaining University status, started their life in the C19th. Many are therefore far 'older' than other established Universities.

    Oxford Polytechnic (now Oxford Brookes) was the first University to introduce modular degrees that allowed students to combine a variety of subjects rather than a narrow 'one subject' degree. It revolutionised the approach towards University education in the 1970s and many Universities then went on to copy this degree structure. Polytechnics were the first to introduce the idea of Work Placements, Year Abroad etc.

    Many of the comments here are a bit naive, and show a lack of understanding about what I can only describe as the 'real world'. Going to University is about far more than 'mine is better than yours'.
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    (Original post by Cameron10)


    Sussex currently has vacancies for Politics and History am I am tempted, the course looks better too, but the university seems to have a strong left wing political culture, which might make me feel uncomfortable given my views. Plus it doesn't have the work-based emphasis like Brookes and isn't near all the major cities, just London.
    SSx is 1.20 hours away from London and I believe it is very left wing and from feedback they put these views into practice as much as they can


    (Original post by Cameron10)
    I just feel like because I'm going to an ex-poly I am selling myself short, but another part of me just tells me to grow up, and it doesn't matter where you go, it's what you do there that matters to employers. My best mate got A*A*A for A level and he is going to Swansea, again like my course asking for BBC.

    Is it bad that despite being someone who is good academically, I want to go to a university where it's practice for working life, rather than pure prestige?

    These are very good grades you got, if I were you I'd seriously think about what you want. With equivalent of AAA ( assuming that none are on the blacklist), you have a lot of choices , may even think about a gap to clear your mind.

    You can even access places much higher than what has been pushed on you - ie) the Manchester and Notts of the world.

    Could quite easily go for the UCLs, LSEs, Durahm, Bristol, Edins of the world
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    No-one is condemned to poor employment or a dreary life just because of their GCSE or A level results. Although many of you wont realise this right now, once you have your degree, even that ceases to matter after your first couple of jobs. In 10 years time no-one will even look at your degree/University on your CV. They will be far more interested in what you've done since. Your A levels? They wont even be on your CV.
    I'm fully aware of all that. If you look back the person I was replying to was asking what the point was in students who are capable of As working hard to achieve that when they can doss about, get Cs and just 'downgrade' their uni. I was saying they should work hard for those As because it's a small sacrifice to open many more doors and give them more options to choose from, not because they'd never get a good job otherwise.
 
 
 
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