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Both my parents haven't worked since the 1980s and I've got a Cambridge offer AMA watch

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    (Original post by Comeback)
    Hi Dalek, congratulations on your Cambridge offer!

    You did Geography AS AQA according to your profile:

    Geography 1-118(A)

    Geography 2-54(A)


    I finished the full A-Level last year (got a B
    )

    I am a few marks away from an A, so will be resitting Geography Unit 2.

    My Geography Unit 1 was actually slightly higher than yours, but my Unit 2 is on the C/B boundary. I need a high B to get the A. For some reason I really struggle with this paper (only Geography paper I got a C in).


    Do you have any advice in particular? Did you just just make lots of fieldwork notes and look at different graphs/statistical tests?

    I know you've probably forgotten most of it as it was a while ago, but any tips/advice you can remember will help!

    Its probably best to look on my thread it has loads of tips and notes on a lot of the topics of that unit, close to the exam I was just answering any question people posed and this helped me remember key details for questions but the whole unit is pretty simple and some people learned set answers for each topic it was that repetitive make decent notes on your fieldwork and look over past papers and you should do fine.I'm not sure whether I can give any better advice than that as I thought I had done much worse in the exam and didn't do that well in my mock I was lucky really.My notes weren't too large they only took about an hour to go over but that meant I could go over them more and learn the key facts.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    A B grade is just about above average so these are not good grades but you are not an idiot as you still passed, if you don't get Cs in both English and Maths then you are an idiot.
    I'm sorry but to say that is incredibly arrogant. There are some people who may struggle with English and Maths, getting Cs/Ds yet they excel at Art or Languages getting A*s. I wouldn't consider these people idiots. Everyone has their flaws, even you do. To be honest, B is a good grade. In your opinion, fine, it isn't. However, when you look at the ranking of grades, it's in 'third place' so to speak. If that isn't considered good, I don't know what is. Just because someone doesn't meet your personal expectations of yourself, does not make them stupid. We all have different capacities. You cannot be the best at everything, there will always be one thing that doesn't match the standards of everything else.

    I honestly congratulate you for getting through your life struggles so far and wish you the best for Cambridge. However, do remember that just because you're looking to study maths, does not make you 'the most academic', 'the best' or 'most talented'. There are plenty of Law students who may go on to be your lawyer one day. There are language students who could be our future ambassadors. There are animation students who could be working on the next Apple product TV advertisement in the future.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Its probably best to look on my thread it has loads of tips and notes on a lot of the topics of that unit, close to the exam I was just answering any question people posed and this helped me remember key details for questions but the whole unit is pretty simple and some people learned set answers for each topic it was that repetitive make decent notes on your fieldwork and look over past papers and you should do fine.I'm not sure whether I can give any better advice than that as I thought I had done much worse in the exam and didn't do that well in my mock I was lucky really.My notes weren't too large they only took about an hour to go over but that meant I could go over them more and learn the key facts.
    Thank you very much!

    I'm sure you'll get your Cambridge offer, good luck in the summer!
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    I don't work out as I couldn't really be bothered and it costs money, which I am not prepared to pay.
    Dumbbells are cheap brahhhh
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    I don't really get how their story is much worse, my parents have never worked for decades nevermind takeaways.I have witnessed my mam have a mental breakdown and my dad threaten my brother with a lighter(due to mental illness I think) and I went to mental hospitals regularly when I was a child to visit them my parents have both been in multiple times.
    Your upbringing was tough but your not the only one who has suffered from that, so please try to act humble, some of your statements about grades are really bad and narrow-minded and its no excuse just because your parent has a mental illness, your dad might of threatened him with a lighter, but has he had knife thrown at him due to mental illness, had the police come to your house almost everyday, have you had your siblings or parents run away from home a number of times due to their mental illness and leave you to pick up the pieces or having to deal with the outburst in public and she had to be visiting not just one parent but almost her all family in hospital, but I dont see her saying she better than everyone else academically, she;s stayed humble and she goes to Cambridge, then again she had my parents and grandma to guide her, so i dont know about your personal situation so can't judge on that aspect, but if you think anyone that can't get A's or even B's are stupid or dont try hard enough then you need to get a reality check.
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    And... at what point do you start to enjoy life? Travelling, concerts, friendships, mistakes and good choices... I could go on. You say there isn't much point to life if you don't succeed academically. Is that really all you ask from life? Not going to mention arrogance or superficiality. Just, really, really sad.
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    (Original post by Atunu)
    And... at what point do you start to enjoy life? Travelling, concerts, friendships, mistakes and good choices... I could go on. You say there isn't much point to life if you don't succeed academically. Is that really all you ask from life? Not going to mention arrogance or superficiality. Just, really, really sad.
    Most people have graduated by the time they're 22, life expectancy in this country is 80-odd. Also, I haven't graduated yet and have managed to travel, make friends, mistake, good choices, had four jobs, been in a relationship for nearly five years, lived out, paid bills/taxes (unfortunately). Life doesn't just stop/start based on whether you're studying or not.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Most people have graduated by the time they're 22, life expectancy in this country is 80-odd. Also, I haven't graduated yet and have managed to travel, make friends, mistake, good choices, had four jobs, been in a relationship for nearly five years, lived out, paid bills/taxes (unfortunately). Life doesn't just stop/start based on whether you're studying or not.
    I know I know, I completely agree! I have also done my few share of things and I'm still about to go to university! I am not very good at expressing myself. What I meant was that he said if he didn't succeed academically there was no point in life and, from my point of view, life is so much more than just your grades. I understand everyone has different opinions, just like I do.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    I have always went through life defining myself by grades eg.I've progressed from GCSE to A Level any time outside study is relaxing from studying/maybe being a bit lazy, life is like levels in a game really and you have to try and get through each level and the current level is A Level.
    Just do whatever makes you happy.
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    (Original post by Atunu)
    And... at what point do you start to enjoy life? Travelling, concerts, friendships, mistakes and good choices... I could go on. You say there isn't much point to life if you don't succeed academically. Is that really all you ask from life? Not going to mention arrogance or superficiality. Just, really, really sad.
    The other goals I want are out of reach like I don't think I will ever get a girlfriend but I don't want to travel or go to concerts or go out with friends(I am some college friends though) these activities are too enduring.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    I already have work experience?everyone is supposed to do some in Y10-some people backed out though.Your degree is suppose to get you a graduate job not experience.A grade B at GCSE shows you aren't really that good its only slightly above average and by getting a grade B you are making a whole lot harder on yourself to do well at A Level its a good indicator for success at A Level and most importantly grades are an indicator of how intelligent you are and good grades generally mean you perceive the world in an intelligent way because if you get lower grades then you are closer to the intelligence of an animal.
    What a ridiculous statement. Grades mean nothing in the real world. God, I'd hate to go to Cambridge if there are people like you there! I have friends who had A grades at GCSE and E grades in the same subjects at AS. GCSEs are memory tests, they mean absolutely nothing. Your piss poor grammar and punctuation really isn't consistent with your elitist nonsense, either.

    A B also isn't a "low grade". A low grade would be a D or an E. You can rote learn most GCSE subjects anyway. If you have a poor memory, you're screwed.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    The other goals I want are out of reach like I don't think I will ever get a girlfriend but I don't want to travel or go to concerts or go out with friends(I am some college friends though) these activities are too enduring.
    Not necessarily out of reach. And also not those specific things but you genuinely don't enjoy anything else bar studying? In any case congratulations and wish you every success in life, hope you find the experience enjoyable.
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    (Original post by Atunu)
    Not necessarily out of reach. And also not those specific things but you genuinely don't enjoy anything else bar studying? In any case congratulations and wish you every success in life, hope you find the experience enjoyable.
    I enjoy watching TV,playing games and going on the internet but I see it as more of a relaxation from studying.
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    (Original post by All_TheCyanide)
    What a ridiculous statement. Grades mean nothing in the real world. God, I'd hate to go to Cambridge if there are people like you there! I have friends who had A grades at GCSE and E grades in the same subjects at AS. GCSEs are memory tests, they mean absolutely nothing. Your piss poor grammar and punctuation really isn't consistent with your elitist nonsense, either.

    A B also isn't a "low grade". A low grade would be a D or an E. You can rote learn most GCSE subjects anyway. If you have a poor memory, you're screwed.
    GCSEs are more than memory tests there were quite a few applied questions on GCSE Science questions and the same could be said for all the GCSEs, I tried very hard and revised very hard for the subjects I found really hard not Maths(as this was easy) and I still got some As showing they were more than memory tests.I actually think GCSEs are underrated like you see people getting A/A*s across the board at A Level who got Bs and Cs or worse in quite a few GCSEs GCSEs could be classed as harder as they assess a wider range of knowledge, requiring you to be intelligent at everything.

    I have so far found that A Levels are a natural progression from GCSEs with overlapping content so I don't get how some people go from A to E, people in my classes at college generally continued their success at A Level there was a student who didn't have a good attitude and didn't put in much work but they ended up turning it round and getting good grades like they did at GCSE.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    GCSEs are more than memory tests there were quite a few applied questions on GCSE Science questions and the same could be said for all the GCSEs, I tried very hard and revised very hard for the subjects I found really hard not Maths(as this was easy) and I still got some As showing they were more than memory tests.I actually think GCSEs are underrated like you see people getting A/A*s across the board at A Level who got Bs and Cs or worse in quite a few GCSEs GCSEs could be classed as harder as they assess a wider range of knowledge, requiring you to be intelligent at everything.

    I have so far found that A Levels are a natural progression from GCSEs with overlapping content so I don't get how some people go from A to E, people in my classes at college generally continued their success at A Level there was a student who didn't have a good attitude and didn't put in much work but they ended up turning it round and getting good grades like they did at GCSE.
    Nah. Lots of definition questions and questions where all you had to do was memorise information, especially for Biology. Apart from that, yes, there were application of knowledge questions here and there (more so in physics and chemistry), but it was still often a case of using an equation for the calculations that you'd memorised (or that had been given to you). History was pure memorisation of events. ICT was also pure memorisation, except for the odd application question. Maths was all about understanding, because you had to follow a set of rules to answer a question. English was memorising quotes, but apart from that it was largely about the quality of writing, so it's a subject you have to be good at. Languages were memorisation of vocab.

    A Levels are nothing like GCSEs! The content is far more rigorous in terms of depth, and if you don't understand it, you've had it. You'll still get the odd memorisation parts, though. CH4 and CH2 for chemistry are largely about memorising reactions and mechanisms, bar the odd application question and calculations. But who cares if I know how to oxidise an alcohol now? I won't remember the reagents in a years' time.
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    (Original post by All_TheCyanide)
    Nah. Lots of definition questions and questions where all you had to do was memorise information, especially for Biology. Apart from that, yes, there were application of knowledge questions here and there (more so in physics and chemistry), but it was still often a case of using an equation for the calculations that you'd memorised (or that had been given to you). History was pure memorisation of events. ICT was also pure memorisation, except for the odd application question. Maths was all about understanding, because you had to follow a set of rules to answer a question. English was memorising quotes, but apart from that it was largely about the quality of writing, so it's a subject you have to be good at. Languages were memorisation of vocab.

    A Levels are nothing like GCSEs! The content is far more rigorous in terms of depth, and if you don't understand it, you've had it. You'll still get the odd memorisation parts, though. CH4 and CH2 for chemistry are largely about memorising reactions and mechanisms, bar the odd application question and calculations. But who cares if I know how to oxidise an alcohol now? I won't remember the reagents in a years' time.
    English wasn't about memorising quotes?I don't think I had to memorise a single one, all my exams were open book it was really about what you got on the day not much with memorisation.

    I revised quite a bit for my Jan Y10 Science exams and got Bs in both and knew that I had to try much harder and I you really had to work doing loads of past papers(from old and new syllabus) to get A*s along with revising through the textbook reading it over and over again and watching myGCSEScience videos I don't have to revise as hard now.

    There were about as many definition questions and memorisation at GCSE as there is at A Level now I think at A Level(more AS) you can still get to fill in tables on what is pretty much memorisation that was a 7 marker in AS Physics.In Languages you really needed practice at interpreting things in the right context, learning vocab wasn't enough as there was so much too learn but the coursework was 100% memorisation though.A Level Physics is a lot like the GCSE with lots more calculations there is much more conceptual stuff I would say but I don't think the jump is that big.

    I was able to self learn most of the A Level Maths (C1-C4) back in Y11 and I am doing it again now but I suppose it is harder than GCSE but GCSE was really easy but I don't see how someone should struggle if they did well in the GCSE I think the important thing is making sure you have got to grips with all of the GCSE syllabus or at least the main important parts, for Maths and Physics it should all follow on naturally if you do remember those parts and often it just feels like an extension(my AS Maths teacher use to go on on showing how the content really wasn't much harder than GCSE yet people struggled:confused:).
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    English wasn't about memorising quotes?I don't think I had to memorise a single one, all my exams were open book it was really about what you got on the day not much with memorisation.

    There were about as many definition questions and memorisation at GCSE as there is at A Level now I think at A Level(more AS) you can still get to fill in tables on what is pretty much memorisation that was a 7 marker in AS Physics.In Languages you really needed practice at interpreting things in the right context, learning vocab wasn't enough as there was so much too learn but the coursework was 100% memorisation though.A Level Physics is a lot like the GCSE with lots more calculations there is much more conceptual stuff I would say but I don't think the jump is that big.

    I was able to self learn most of the A Level Maths (C1-C4) back in Y11 and I am doing it again now but I suppose it is harder than GCSE but GCSE was really easy but I don't see how someone should struggle if they did well in the GCSE I think the important thing is making sure you have got to grips with all of the GCSE syllabus or at least the main important parts, for Maths and Physics it should all follow on naturally if you do remember those parts and often it just feels like an extension(my AS Maths teacher use to go on on showing how the content really wasn't much harder than GCSE yet people struggled:confused:).
    We had to memorise quotes, my exam wasn't open book. Weirdly, though, the A2 exam is open book.

    Yes but the content is harder at A Level, so although there's memorisation, the application questions are far harder. That's why I got an A at GCSE and an E at AS and so did a lot of people I know (chemistry). I'm thinking I should have taken physics since although I'm bad at maths, the calculations were easy at GCSE, but then the content must be harder. I think the main issue with A Level sciences is the volume of the content, too, as there's loads of it. Biology is hard especially because the mark schemes change from year to year in terms of what specific words they'll accept. Languages are sometimes application, but I got As just by learning vocab and guessing the meaning of things based on memorised vocab. Maybe I just have an aptitude for languages, I don't know.

    I find maths very difficult. I always have. When it's explained to me, it's easy, but I have difficulty interpreting the questions sometimes. That's why I liked physics- just use an equation and that's that, mostly.
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    (Original post by All_TheCyanide)
    We had to memorise quotes, my exam wasn't open book. Weirdly, though, the A2 exam is open book.

    Yes but the content is harder at A Level, so although there's memorisation, the application questions are far harder. That's why I got an A at GCSE and an E at AS and so did a lot of people I know (chemistry). I'm thinking I should have taken physics since although I'm bad at maths, the calculations were easy at GCSE, but then the content must be harder. I think the main issue with A Level sciences is the volume of the content, too, as there's loads of it. Biology is hard especially because the mark schemes change from year to year in terms of what specific words they'll accept. Languages are sometimes application, but I got As just by learning vocab and guessing the meaning of things based on memorised vocab. Maybe I just have an aptitude for languages, I don't know.

    I find maths very difficult. I always have. When it's explained to me, it's easy, but I have difficulty interpreting the questions sometimes. That's why I liked physics- just use an equation and that's that, mostly.
    A lot of Maths can be done with formulas, even with A Level there will be marks for literally just using a formula, however most of the time when you use a formula in Maths A Level you will need understanding to calculate a component of the formula but really Maths could probably be done by mass memorisation of formulas for the understanding parts you wouldn't be given in the formula book or at least of extremely similar past paper questions.

    A Level Physics doesn't really have a large amount of content its much more about the application and concepts and you still get a lot of marks for formula sheet work.Although at A2 there is much more rearranging equations to get general results(without subbing in numbers) like in Maths.
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    How is your life outside academia? Do you have any particular hobbies or things you're passionate outside of maths?

    You mentioned your parents have suffered with mental illness - have you? (sorry if that's already been asked)
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    A B grade is just about above average so these are not good grades but you are not an idiot as you still passed, if you don't get Cs in both English and Maths then you are an idiot.
    I got 5A* and 6A as well at GCSE with 95%+ in Lit and Lang.
 
 
 
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