If you're earning less than £30,000 per year you may as well be on the dole PROOF! Watch

T.I.P
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#101
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#101
(Original post by J-SP)
That would be a choice the other parent could work if needed and therefore have a higher income. If they didn't, they would still have the dole money on top of the main earner, plus child benefit, meaning their total income would be more than £30k.


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Incorrect you now dont get dole money if your partner works over a certain amount of hours, also even if your partner worked say 25hrs a week you would get dole money but you would get around £10 due to living as a couple.
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felamaslen
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#102
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#102
I'd rather be poor and working than be handed lots of money from taxpayers that I don't deserve.
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T.I.P
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#103
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#103
(Original post by J-SP)
Would still get working tax credits and child allowance, resulting in a higher income.


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Child benefit is £20pw for your first child and 10pw for second. Working tax credit is based on income. My mate earns 12k a year and takes 140 in tax credit, so you can guess what it would be for someone earning 30k. Feel free to use income calculators on the .gov site if you dont believe me.

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T.I.P
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#104
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#104
(Original post by J-SP)
I never claimed they were going to be huge. But nearly £2k a year in child benefit alone is a fair amount, especially if you are only taking home around £2k a month


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How does £100pm workout to nearly 2k per year?

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vickie89uk
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#105
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#105
(Original post by Dalek1099)
This argument fails on lots of levels the first is a very high rent of £700 a month my mam's rent would be around £400 a month if she worked but lets just assume that is the rent you have to pay.You say you have to spend £1300 a month now lets take off the £700 a month and £120 council tax that means the rest of these costs are £480 a month which is quite a bit over the roughly £70 a week(£300 a month on your JSA) so you wouldn't be able to afford all this on the dole, so you need to add £180 a month at least to your argument and probably really £480 a month as rent isn't usually that high and also £12.35 a day is quite a large amount that saves you up £4600 a year that is quite a lot of spare money?Obviously you don't expect a life of luxury as that is still below the mean wage and if you add that £480 a month on that gives you an extra £5760 to spend on things plus the £4600 a year thats £10360 a year that would amount to about 100k in 10 years and your wage would probably go up to.
Also depending on age its £54/£72 odd i believe a week and people on the dole have to contribute to council tax £197 a year toward their bill and still pay gor electricity so infact the amount you have on the dole is much less than your £4000 spare a year

Im not on the dole but my sister in law in a support worker who deals with these issues. So she/he fails there too


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T.I.P
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#106
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#106
(Original post by vickie89uk)
Also depending on age its £54/£72 odd i believe a week and people on the dole have to contribute to council tax £197 a year toward their bill and still pay gor electricity so infact the amount you have on the dole is much less than your £4000 spare a year

Im not on the dole but my sister in law in a support worker who deals with these issues. So she/he fails there too


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Wrong on so many levels I will respond back using maths, logic and facts when Im less tired.

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Rick Deckard
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#107
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#107
Rent is dead money.
Turn that £700 into a mortgage payment, thats £700 stashed into your home equity. You're saving/investing £700 a month, which is more than you'd see on the dole in a long time.
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Rick Deckard
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#108
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#108
It's true that not everyone can get a mortgage.

If you had 20k take home salary after tax and N.I. , lived like a student, reduced your expenses to 12k, you've got an 8k a year surplus.

3 years and you've got 24k towards a house deposit. If you don't want to have a house, well you've got 24k in Party money. You couldn't squirrel this away in the dole. If you magically managed 16k, your benefits get stopped.

People on the dole also don't get the freedom of choosing where they live. They also have to be at the beck and call of the job centre.

20k take home salary is not equivalent to being on the dole. You can choose your housing and have enough money to save a substantial portion to better your situation.
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tim_123
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Quady)
Above the median wage is a starting point?
i meant based on ops example. What I'm getting at is I started on 20k, and a year and a bit later I'm now on 27k
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SmashConcept
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#110
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#110
(Original post by T.I.P)
Well it doesn't specifically say this so lets assume you earn 30k a year while your wife looks after your children... its a common scenario for many, Im sure many take home less also.
Oh my god, so you're saying 30k spread across 4 people isn't that much? Wow!! Maybe it would be even less spread across 5 people. I think you may be onto something here.
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Quady
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#111
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#111
(Original post by M1011)
Is this a joke or are you out of touch with reality? =/
Out of touch with reality?

Really, where?
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Quady
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#112
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#112
(Original post by Rick Deckard)
Rent is dead money.
Turn that £700 into a mortgage payment, thats £700 stashed into your home equity. You're saving/investing £700 a month, which is more than you'd see on the dole in a long time.
Its not dead money if house prices fall. Buying can be dead money then.

Also a £700 mortgage payment isn't £700 equity.
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Michael_Real
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#113
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#113
To be honest £12.35 a day in disposable income is not bad actually. That would be around £86 a week. Now depending on how lavish you want to live tour life is up to you but I know with £86 lying around every week I could go out with my mates 2 or 3 times a week and still save a good £30-£40 a week. What more do you want at such an age? (Presumably you're in your early/mid 20s). In this day and age its quite hard to find many graduates walking into 50k jobs anyway, get back to reality!!!

And for those talking about how expensive London is...you're 100% right. It is quite expensive, which is why if you're not their with a job that provides you enough money to live and save then you should probably look at jobs elsewhere because house prices we going to continue to rise. What's the point in living somewhere where you can barely afford to live let alone save for buying your own house in the future? Act you WAGE people!

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Rick Deckard
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#114
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#114
(Original post by Quady)
Its not dead money if house prices fall. Buying can be dead money then.

Also a £700 mortgage payment isn't £700 equity.
Both fair points. I think there's a lot of situations where renting is a better option.

However I think OP's premise that you can't live 20k (on a student forum) a bit defeatist.
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M1011
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#115
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#115
(Original post by Quady)
Out of touch with reality?

Really, where?
You're factually incorrect. I've done it, therefore it isn't an opinion, it's a fact.

How much do you think someone on £35k with a modest lifestyle has to spend on rent out of interest?
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M1011
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#116
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#116
(Original post by J-SP)
Most private landlords won't take on someone as a tenant if the rent is more than 40% of their gross salary, so they could be renting anything up to £1150 a month.


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Edit: Just realised you aren't the person I was originally speaking to. I'm not sure what your position is, do you agree with Quady that people can't live on £35k in London on their own?

If so, here's 400+ reasons why you'd be wrong, all posted in the last 14 days.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-...Type=long_term
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The two eds
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#117
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#117
Blame Labour for that
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yo radical one
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#118
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#118
I think it's a very sad thing if your great ambition in life is to sit around doing nothing...
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T.I.P
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#119
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#119
(Original post by yo radical one)
I think it's a very sad thing if your great ambition in life is to sit around doing nothing...
People on the doll probs think its sad you willingly submit to be a slave tbh.

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Quady
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#120
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#120
(Original post by M1011)
You're factually incorrect. I've done it, therefore it isn't an opinion, it's a fact.

How much do you think someone on £35k with a modest lifestyle has to spend on rent out of interest?
On their own in London? £750.

Happy to be advised otherwise, which is why I've asked twice where it can be done.
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