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    The 'strict school uniform' photo story is becoming as much of a seasonal cliche as the old 'jumping for joy' on exam results day.

    here's a girl sent home for wearing tight trousers http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ed-skirts.html
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Everyone now has to stay in education or training until their 18th birthday. I don't see why a job she may have in over 4 years time stops her having a certain hairstyle now.
    She may decide to keep her hairstyle but regardless she needs to understand now that it may damage her future career.
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    (Original post by Perplexing Pleb)
    She may decide to keep her hairstyle but regardless she needs to understand now that it may damage her future career.
    Why should a job in the future stop her having her hair a certain way now?
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Why should a job in the future stop her having her hair a certain way now?
    She may still have it then. But that doesn't matter she needs to understand now that it does not matter how she wants her hair, its how those in charge do. That fact that she is prepared to stay at home because she wants to have that moronic haircut rather than go to school suggests it will be a problem in the future.
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    She looks like a right Muppet, and the mother looks like she's angry because her benefit hasn't come in on time.

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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Why should a job in the future stop her having her hair a certain way now?
    I thought we'd been over this. She can have the hair however she wants, but as it's against the school rules, she can't have it and attend the school at the same time.

    The only reason people mention the jobs etc, is trying to explain why the school has the rules in the first place. If you don't think the reasoning is fair, it doesn't matter too much as there's a lot of rules in life people don't always agree with.

    I refer back to a post I made yesterday morning - the girl has the freedom to have the hair however she wants. If she was of school leaving age, this would almost certainly have an affect on her employment prospects. She is not of school leaving age, so it's merely affecting her education prospects.

    She has a right to an education, which has meant that education available if she plays by the rules.

    There's nothing really to this - the girl think she's got a right to have the hair how she wants it, which she does, she just think the right over-rides every conflicting rule in life (in this case at the school). This is where the problem is, as it doesn't.
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    It's a state school. If it was a private school then they could do whatever they wanted. It's up to the owners. But in a state school, this is a disgrace. What is the problem with hair like that? ridiculous.
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    what is it about a state school having rules of reasonable and proportionate dress policy that is disgraceful?

    I'll be honest, I'm quite surprised at the amount of surprise people have that rules exist, and ultimately were enforced.
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    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    what is it about a state school having rules of reasonable and proportionate dress policy that is disgraceful?

    I'll be honest, I'm quite surprised at the amount of surprise people have that rules exist, and ultimately were enforced.
    A parent that takes a child out of school in term time could face a fine of up to £2,500 or up to three months in jail but a school can kick them out for a haircut. Doesn't quite seem right to me.
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    (Original post by n09)
    A parent that takes a child out of school in term time could face a fine of up to £2,500 or up to three months in jail but a school can kick them out for a haircut. Doesn't quite seem right to me.
    I understand what you're saying, but the child only needs to sort the haircut and return.

    So it's not 'kicked out' it's just 'sort it out'.

    The alternative would be handing out detentions etc, but the school isn't trying to punish the girl here, just trying to get her to abide by the school policy. How else do you do it? The policy is fair at and they are not being unreasonable.
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    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    I understand what you're saying, but the child only needs to sort the haircut and return.

    So it's not 'kicked out' it's just 'sort it out'.
    That haircut looks beyond being sorted out any time soon.
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    That isn't the schools fault.

    Nothing saying there isn't a school willing to take the child either, so happy hunting. But if you give yourself a daft haircut you can't sort out and find yourself not able to find a school for it, you've been a bit daft given anyone with common sense knows without even needing to consult the school what constitutes reasonable dress.

    In this instance you're breaching your own right to an education by being daft.
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    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    what is it about a state school having rules of reasonable and proportionate dress policy that is disgraceful?

    I'll be honest, I'm quite surprised at the amount of surprise people have that rules exist, and ultimately were enforced.

    I think the surprise people are expressing is at the absurdity of not allowing a child to attend school based on a haircut.
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    In all fairness and to concede somewhat I suppose I did share some sense of absurdity at the situation if I have to be honest, but my surprise was more that someone, serious about fitting in with society (from which human rights are formed) and equally serious about receiving quality education, would turn up at school styled as a leopard.

    I personally can't see anything absurd about the fact the child was turned away over a haircut. The words scream absurd but I've seen the haircut so I know from reasonable judgement it's valid to say it's extreme.
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    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    That isn't the schools fault.

    Nothing saying there isn't a school willing to take the child either, so happy hunting. But if you give yourself a daft haircut you can't sort out and find yourself not able to find a school for it, you've been a bit daft given anyone with common sense knows without even needing to consult the school what constitutes reasonable dress.

    In this instance you're breaching your own right to an education by being daft.
    If a holiday isnt a good enough reason to take a child out of school i'm not sure how a haircut can be.
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    It is the action of the child and the mother that has made her unfit for school.

    I'm confident that if there is a law, or policy, that makes it the schools responsibility or obligation to educate this child regardless of haircut, then this will be excercised.

    However, I have never known a challenge like this succeed. I suspect if there was any remote possibility of this, schools would not be able to enforce their rules, which they've rightly drafted up for a vast number of reasons, such as discipline and equality.

    The rules are known, the child broke them. Nobody is breaching anyone rights or access to education other than the kid and the parent.

    That what it's going to boil down to.
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    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    It is the action of the child and the mother that has made her unfit for school.
    Unless her haircut involved a scalping she's not unfit for school.


    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    I'm confident that if there is a law, or policy, that makes it the schools responsibility or obligation to educate this child regardless of haircut, then this will be excercised.

    However, I have never known a challenge like this succeed. I suspect if there was any remote possibility of this, schools would not be able to enforce their rules, which they've rightly drafted up for a vast number of reasons, such as discipline and equality.

    The rules are known, the child broke them. Nobody is breaching anyone rights or access to education other than the kid and the parent.

    That what it's going to boil down to.
    I'm not saying there are laws in place, but if a parent faces fines and jail time for taking a child out of school without good reason then so should a school.
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    (Original post by redleader1)
    Dont you think her haircut was a bit over the top ? What if you walked into a decent job like that surely they would have something to say
    I guess so.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    School is not only about education, it's about discipline as well. Look at the education systems in other countries and I bet you that the disciplinary requirements are much more tougher. What kind of school would it be if its grads were ****ing punks without any discipline or basic principles?
    Yeah, I guess you are right
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    these girls !!

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...oes-black.html
 
 
 
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