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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    "Coming up on CNN Crossfire, Mark from accounting winked at Lucy from payroll over by the water cooler. Here's Wolf Blitzer with the full story..."
    lol nice :borat:


    (Original post by Philbert)
    Commenting on someone's appearance in a work context is not professional, but neither is publishing personal messages.
    This pretty much sums it up imho.

    This sort of melodrama would greatly put me off from working with someone, personally.
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    (Original post by citydeer)
    this isnt even the story - a 50 year old lawyer sent a phd student a message on her linkdn profile (which is used for work/professional things) telling her she was "stunning" and it was "best linkdn profile" he had seen
    also worth noticing he wrote in the message it wasnt correct behaviour and did it anyway
    But is it sexist to call a woman "stunning"? Of course the way he spoke to her on a professional networking site was unwise but to say that he was being sexist just for paying her that compliment feels so overblown.

    And then she had to make it public rather than simply be professional herself, ironically. It was enough to tell him he was being unprofessional and it was enough to make him apologise. Sometimes women just need to know to let things go, it didn't need to escalate so far.
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    My favourite quote of hers:

    It has a huge, profound effect on women’s career opportunities, making them feel uncomfortable working in male-dominated places, for example in the law. That is why I try to nip it in the bud before it escalates
    Good job stopping it escalating, genius.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    This!

    Women in male dominated workplaces have to put up with this **** constantly, when will people understand that a) we couldn't give a flying **** what you think about our looks and b) professional environments are not the place to hit on people.

    It's not the same for men, it just isn't. My partner used to work somewhere dominated by older women. People treated him as a professional equal and he wasn't hit on once.
    "this ****" ? He called her the equivalent of attractive... hardly offensive.

    It would also be unfair that just because she's heard it a few times before, she makes HIM in particular look like a **** by talking about him on national news, when HE only called her attractive once (which, again, isn't even offensive).

    It's possible your partner didn't bother telling you about one of them hitting on him you know. Women do do it too.

    And anyway, why couldn't a man try to make something happen with someone from work if he is attracted to her. It wouldn't have a big horrified reaction if she found the guy hot would it. And many times, work is the only time people get out apart from weekends. IF you find someone you're interested it, give it a go.
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    If the feminists get their way, it will be illegal for a man to even look in the direction of a woman within this generation
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    (Original post by Hevachan)
    I think she has a point but has over reacted. She should have told him to be more professional especially with female buisness women and left it there! Now shes just digging herself into a hole
    I don't agree with that. What if a women states to a man you look stunning, handsome, sexy, hot etc wiukd the same storm apply? I think not. Feminist gone too far!
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    (Original post by bassbabe)
    Stupid feminists like her are ruining everything for the rest of the adult female population. Now men are going to feel like they cant compliment women in case they get the same response. She'll be dying to receive compliments when she's past her prime lol.
    Oh no. Poor men won't feel like they can comment on a women's appearance in inappropriate situations. How will women cope without being objectified? How will society cope when men see a woman's achievements ahead of their appearance?
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    (Original post by MetalAlchemist)
    I don't think there is any harm in complimenting somebody, especially when you're in a committed relationship.

    If somebody thought that it's wrong to compliment others, when you're in a relationship then it just shows that the person has insecurities.


    Saying something positive to another person could brighten their day.
    I'm not insecure. I just don't think it's ever okay to call another man/woman physically appealing.
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    who cares? she's ugly anyway and I bet spending more than 5 minutes with her leaves you wanting to kill yourself.

    she should be glad a man gave her 5 seconds of attention in the first place.
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    (Original post by alexmccarthy)
    Not aiming to start an argument here but a well founded debate, but how do you feel that the comment is sexist? Genuinely interested and I think it helps to hear other people's views
    This was on a PROFESSIONAL profile, not a dating profile or a personal social media profile and he didn't comment on her abilities, achievements, job... The only thing he commented on was her appearance. If this was a one off then it would be disgusting but this is the way women around the world are treated every day. This is an ingrained problem that our patriarchal society sees women's appearance as more important than their minds.

    Cis men (in general - obviously not all) seem to have this arrogant viewpoint that women want to know what they think of their appearance and that women should change how they look (whether that be weight, hair, clothes, make-up) to fit what 'men find attractive' and even when they're told that these comments are unwanted and offensive the men who say them feel they are 'entitled' to voice their opinions.
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    (Original post by emerl98)
    It is wrong, but it is not sexist at all. All those points you made were assumptions of what the man was thinking at the time. Who says beautiful women can't be intelligent? You're accepting the same stereotype that feminists are trying to erase and prevent. And then you say that we're the ones being sexist. The point of Feminism is to stand up to an unfair society, not to try and fit into it.

    Is the correct sentence for this situation.


    That statement makes no sense. That's like saying that if I'm not willing to have sex with another man, then I am objectifying women.
    I'm saying appearance has no correlation with intelligence. But I'm saying that society treats women like there is. Society sees a woman who is considered 'beautiful' can't have got her job due to her mind. People of all genders should be able to have WHATEVER appearance they want and not be judged based on them. I am not saying anyone should have to fit into societies view of what an 'intelligent, professional woman' should look like. I am saying that for women in the workplace there's negativity whatever their appearance. They're told to look 'more attractive' and 'more feminine' if they do not fit into the narrow beauty standards society has but if they change their appearance they're then assumed to not be intelligent and to have only got where there are due to their appearance.
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    (Original post by jshone)
    "this ****" ? He called her the equivalent of attractive... hardly offensive.

    It would also be unfair that just because she's heard it a few times before, she makes HIM in particular look like a **** by talking about him on national news, when HE only called her attractive once (which, again, isn't even offensive).

    It's possible your partner didn't bother telling you about one of them hitting on him you know. Women do do it too.

    And anyway, why couldn't a man try to make something happen with someone from work if he is attracted to her. It wouldn't have a big horrified reaction if she found the guy hot would it. And many times, work is the only time people get out apart from weekends. IF you find someone you're interested it, give it a go.
    Point completely missed right there...


    You wait til after work/socialising then invite them for a drink, you don't tell them ' you're fit ' in professional setting, its belittling and rude.
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    (Original post by Mr JB)
    Both have happened to me as well as other male colleagues. You're acting as if women don't do it to men as well. Both sexes are as bad as one another, and both people involved in this particular incident need to grow up as they're both being incredibly unprofessional.
    Well if you're gonna insist women are as bad as men (which statistics show isn't the case but hey ho - in academia for example women experience far far higher levels of unprofessional behaviour directed towards them) then you have to at least admit more workplaces are male dominated than female dominated. Therefore it is more of an issue this way round.

    Also most female dominated fields are in the public sector, where this crap is far less tolerated.
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    I think she has a point.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    This was on a PROFESSIONAL profile, not a dating profile or a personal social media profile and he didn't comment on her abilities, achievements, job... The only thing he commented on was her appearance. If this was a one off then it would be disgusting but this is the way women around the world are treated every day. This is an ingrained problem that our patriarchal society sees women's appearance as more important than their minds.

    Cis men (in general - obviously not all) seem to have this arrogant viewpoint that women want to know what they think of their appearance and that women should change how they look (whether that be weight, hair, clothes, make-up) to fit what 'men find attractive' and even when they're told that these comments are unwanted and offensive the men who say them feel they are 'entitled' to voice their opinions.
    Perhaps she didn't have any achievements/qualifications that were particularly impressive?

    It would be disgusting to compliment someone? That's a very strange view to have.

    I actually feel sorry for you, you have such a skewed view on how the world works.

    (Original post by redferry)
    Point completely missed right there...


    You wait til after work/socialising then invite them for a drink, you don't tell them ' you're fit ' in professional setting, its belittling and rude.
    It wasn't in a professional setting, they weren't sitting in the office one day and he blurted it out.




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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    Perhaps she didn't have any achievements/qualifications that were particularly impressive?

    It would be disgusting to compliment someone? That's a very strange view to have.

    I actually feel sorry for you, you have such a skewed view on how the world works.



    It wasn't in a professional setting, they weren't sitting in the office one day and he blurted it out.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    If her academic and professional achievements are not 'impressive' then he doesn't need to talk to her on a PROFESSIONAL networking site.

    How is it not a professional setting?
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    Irony was she's a 5/10 at best, not stunning just distinctly average. She has a point though, it was an unnecessary comment that wasnt needed and was unprofessional. That being said a quick message back to express her disappointment would have sufficed, not crying to the press.
    Most likely it is the first time someone had called her stunning and she wanted it documented
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    (Original post by MetalAlchemist)
    I was watching the news today, and I looked into this "Sexism Row" discussion.

    A female lawyer accused a male lawyer for being sexist, because he gave her a compliment. He said that her picture is "stunning" and was highly offended by this comment.

    Now, she has made it a big deal to the point where it's on National TV and she is still trying justify herself on why the comment is sexist.

    The male lawyer is also being shamed on television, because of it!!!!

    I think it's a ridiculous accusation.

    What do you think about this?
    Ridiculous. Anything to get attention.


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    White feminism at its finest...
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I'm saying appearance has no correlation with intelligence. But I'm saying that society treats women like there is. Society sees a woman who is considered 'beautiful' can't have got her job due to her mind. People of all genders should be able to have WHATEVER appearance they want and not be judged based on them. I am not saying anyone should have to fit into societies view of what an 'intelligent, professional woman' should look like. I am saying that for women in the workplace there's negativity whatever their appearance. They're told to look 'more attractive' and 'more feminine' if they do not fit into the narrow beauty standards society has but if they change their appearance they're then assumed to not be intelligent and to have only got where there are due to their appearance.
    "Society" "tells" "women" etc. :rolleyes:

    Cut the crap.
 
 
 
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