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Should people be allowed to wear full face veils in hospitals? watch

  • View Poll Results: would you want to be treated by someone wearing a full face veil?
    yes - I don't care
    52
    33.12%
    No - I would like to see their face
    105
    66.88%

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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    So then by this logic, surgeons should be banned from wearing masks in all situations other than those in which they're necessary for hygiene purposes. But they're not.
    Not at all because it's impractical and they may be moving from one ward to another.
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    (Original post by silverbolt)
    what if the person doesnt want to be seen by a person with veil for whatever reason?
    They can be seen by a person without a veil. It's unlikely that hospitals will be at a shortage of veil-less doctors.

    Veils are unlikely to be provided by the NHS, how much infectious materials could be brought in by those wearing them.

    They are breathing into cloth, germs and whatnot are going to settle on these face cloths. How long before something is passed onto a patient like MRSA?
    In this case, it's reasonable to ban veils which are made of specific materials considered to be unhygienic. There isn't a need to ban veils per se.
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    (Original post by elliemayxo)
    No they shouldn't. It's intimidating. Don't come here with your religion when we can't do the same with ours.


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    elaborate what you mean by "we can't do the same with ours."
    ps my opinion is that they shouldnt be allowed to be worn in the hospitals like said in the video I would like to see who's treating me
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    (Original post by HAnwar)
    Wouldn't it kinda be more hygienic though. Covering the mouth and all lol...
    Exactly!! surgeons cover their mouth during operations,so what is the issue?
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    (Original post by tehforum)
    Not at all because it's impractical and they may be moving from one ward to another.
    Well then surgeon's masks could cause exactly the same issues in terms of security risks, inability to identify them on CCTV, prevention of patient rapport etc.

    Even if you ban a female, Muslim doctor from wearing a veil, there's nothing to stop her from wearing a surgeon's mask at all times instead. So in terms of the security and rapport issues you mention, it doesn't achieve anything. You would have to implement some sort of restriction on surgeon's masks at certain times as well.
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    I agree with elliemayxo, covering the face with a veil in nearly all public environments is a barrier to social interaction, and a security risk in the same way the wearing of a balaclava is. I believe a banning of face coverings has nothing to do with tolerance, respect for other religions, or being a xenophobe, it is about wanting to create a secure society. There are no grounds for denying full-face coverings are not a security risk when terror suspects have escaped wearing a burqa, committed robbery wearing a burqa as a disguise, and the balaclava is widely associated with criminal activity. Her final comment holds true, when in a country of people that do not regularly cover their full faces in public, doing so is a barrier that prevents full integration with that society; fitting in with the majority by adopting the same dress culture is away of promoting social cohesion.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    I agree with elliemayxo, covering the face with a veil in nearly all public environments is a barrier to social interaction, and a security risk in the same way the wearing of a balaclava is. I believe a banning of face coverings has nothing to do with tolerance, respect for other religions, or being a xenophobe, it is about wanting to create a secure society. There are no grounds for denying full-face coverings are not a security risk when terror suspects have escaped wearing a burqa, committed robbery wearing a burqa as a disguise, and the balaclava is widely associated with criminal activity. Her final comment holds true, when in a country of people that do not regularly cover their full faces in public, doing so is a barrier that prevents full integration with that society; fitting in with the majority by adopting the same dress culture is a way of promoting social cohesion.
    👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻 👍🏻


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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Well then surgeon's masks could cause exactly the same issues in terms of security risks, inability to identify them on CCTV, prevention of patient rapport etc.

    Even if you ban a female, Muslim doctor from wearing a veil, there's nothing to stop her from wearing a surgeon's mask at all times instead. So in terms of the security and rapport issues you mention, it doesn't achieve anything. You would have to implement some sort of restriction on surgeon's masks as well.
    The surgeon would not be a security risk because of the use of electronic card systems to enter into restricted areas of the hospital. It's easy to track their movements; not so for someone who is a member of the public. The deterioration of patient rapport is not an issue here because that only comes to play when there is direct, personal interaction with a patient. No one realistically expects to build rapport with a surgeon is on the move, and doesn't even treat them anyway.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    If not, then surgeons shouldn't be allowed to wear a mask over their face.
    There is a significant difference between a consultation - where nuances of communication (including facial expressions) convey much of the meaning and where it is important to have lack of fear and apprehension, and an atmosphere of trust, integrity and openness - and an operation, where there is no communication going on between the operating team and the patient, and where hygiene for open body parts is of the utmost importance.

    Surely even a rabidly superstitious person can see that?
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    (Original post by person81993939)
    Exactly!! surgeons cover their mouth during operations,so what is the issue?
    People like making a big deal out of everything lol
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    (Original post by elliemayxo)
    Exactly. If I went over there and showed any of my skin then God knows what would happen to me


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    Where is this 'there' you keep speaking of?


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    (Original post by childofthesun)
    Where is this 'there' you keep speaking of?


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    Any Muslim country that doesn't allow women to walk round showing any skin.


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    (Original post by tehforum)
    The surgeon would not be a security risk because of the use of electronic card systems to enter into restricted areas of the hospital. It's easy to track their movements; not so for someone who is a member of the public.
    Simple solution - give members of the public a visitor's pass upon identification, which works in the same way as staff members' electronic cards, authorising them for access to the ward they need to visit.

    The deterioration of patient rapport is not an issue here because that only comes to play when there is direct, personal interaction with a patient. No one realistically expects to build rapport with a surgeon is on the move, and doesn't even treat them anyway.
    But if a surgeon is directly interacting with a patient, speaking to them and explaining things to them etc. then at that time, they should be banned from wearing their mask, to ensure that the best rapport is built right?
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    (Original post by preetg97)
    Aw cutie x
    Ignore her
    She aint worth it
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Simple solution - give members of the public a visitor's pass upon identification, which works in the same way as staff members' electronic cards, authorising them for access to the ward they need to visit.



    But if a surgeon is directly interacting with a patient, speaking to them and explaining things to them etc. then at that time, they should be banned from wearing their mask, to ensure that the best rapport is built right?
    A disproportionate solution to a problem! Just what we needed.

    No right minded surgeon would wear a mask when they're talking to a patient. You have an urge to provide non solutions, and ban things when it's simply not needed.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    There is a significant difference between a consultation - where nuances of communication (including facial expressions) convey much of the meaning and where it is important to have lack of fear and apprehension, and an atmosphere of trust, integrity and openness - and an operation, where there is no communication going on between the operating team and the patient, and where hygiene for open body parts is of the utmost importance.

    Surely even a rabidly superstitious person can see that?
    Of course. So then a surgeon should be banned from wearing their mask while they are speaking to patients rather than operating?
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    (Original post by elliemayxo)
    No they shouldn't. It's intimidating. Don't come here with your religion when we can't do the same with ours.


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    The reason countries like ours are better than authoritarian theocracies like Saudi Arabia is because we have things like freedom of religion...


    I'd say if you are a doctor or some kind of medical professional on the front line you should not have your face completely covered. If you can;t do that then you are not suited to that kind of job, sorry If we are talking visors and members of public they can wear what they like.
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    (Original post by tehforum)
    A solution to a non problem! Just what we needed.

    No right minded surgeon would wear a mask when they're talking to a patient. You have an urge to provide non solutions, and ban things when it's simply not needed.
    Well if you're leaving it to the surgeon's discretion as to when they can wear a mask, why not also leave it to their discretion as to when they wear a veil?
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Simple solution - give members of the public a visitor's pass upon identification, which works in the same way as staff members' electronic cards, authorising them for access to the ward they need to visit.
    would you then be OK with asking those muslims who chose to cover to pay for the infrastructure to allow the hospitals to issue these passes and pay the cost of running and maintain this system.

    But if you are comparing a veil with a surgeons mask do you then agree they are only to be worn when the work requires it prevent contamination and infection but are removed during all other times?
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Well if you're leaving it to the surgeon's discretion as to when they can wear a mask, why not also leave it to their discretion as to when they wear a veil?
    Because it's completely different as I've explained before re: nuance and rapport.
 
 
 
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