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Communication Difficulties Society! watch

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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    This is where I struggle. Being visually impaired, it's really difficult to pick up on facial expressions too, which has led to one or two awkward situations. A friend of mine has come to the conclusion that you can't really wind me up, because whatever you say, I'm just going to take it the wrong way.

    Online is just as bad for the reasons you say. Unless people put in their posts, it's really difficult to generally know how serious they're being.

    But it's gone the other way too - I thought a friend of mine was joking. He wasn't and I got a right telling off.
    Sorry, missed this! I can imagine that making things a lot harder. I find some people harder to tell with than others, also where people use (verbal) expressions I've not come across before and I don't know whether to take them literally or not.

    Yep, done that too! Some people I just assume that everything is sarcastic which is fine until they're actually serious and I don't realise I'm alright using it myself though which is odd
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    (Original post by furryface12)
    Sorry, missed this! I can imagine that making things a lot harder. I find some people harder to tell with than others, also where people use (verbal) expressions I've not come across before and I don't know whether to take them literally or not.

    Yep, done that too! Some people I just assume that everything is sarcastic which is fine until they're actually serious and I don't realise I'm alright using it myself though which is odd
    We were away earlier this year and my friend was trying to teach me something. He told me to do something and I asked if he meant this or that. He then said then "you take everything so literally don't you?" I was actually waiting for him to pick up on that.

    Strangely, like you, I am ok using it myself. And I'm ok for the most part, using mtepahors and similies. But a lot of them I don't understand.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    We were away earlier this year and my friend was trying to teach me something. He told me to do something and I asked if he meant this or that. He then said then "you take everything so literally don't you?" I was actually waiting for him to pick up on that.

    Strangely, like you, I am ok using it myself. And I'm ok for the most part, using mtepahors and similies. But a lot of them I don't understand.
    Yeah, I'm the same with the literal stuff, half the time it doesn't occur to me it could be taken any other way. I do seem to make connections between stuff that other people miss, but then don't understand the ones that are apparently very obvious :dontknow:

    Similes I find easier as the 'like' tends to give it away. Metaphors I'm usually sat there thinking 'what..' until I catch on, or just don't I'll work it out one day!


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    I have Dyspraxia. It's not just verbal for me, but verbal dyspraxia is part and parcel of it. Often I cannot get the words out fast enough or I cannot get the words out at all. I have trouble explaining things. Basically it's a list of things I cannot say and ways that I cannot say them. So this is a good idea.
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    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    I have Dyspraxia. It's not just verbal for me, but verbal dyspraxia is part and parcel of it. Often I cannot get the words out fast enough or I cannot get the words out at all. I have trouble explaining things. Basically it's a list of things I cannot say and ways that I cannot say them. So this is a good idea.
    Same

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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Do those who experience communication difficulties find communicating online easier? Obviously this will depend if the difficulty if with spoken or written form - thoughts?
    Online I can formulate sentences and arguments clear and concise. I can write it, edit and rewrite it, whatever it is. That's one reason why I've always enjoyed being on forums. If I were in a real life verbal debate though, I don't think I'd fair as well. Especially since arguments and retorts would have to be quick and off the cuff. I'd be far too tongue tied.
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    (Original post by CoolCavy)
    I AM SO FED UP OF BEING TOLD TO SPEAK MORE CLEARLY
    like why can't you make the effort to shut up and listen rather than me having to do it all the time
    My boss at my current job used to say that. I've been there two years, but when I first started I didn't disclose my Dyspraxia. I didn't feel it necessary and I didn't want to. I would try to relay messages to him or issues to him but sometimes I'd get things muddled up. I would just want to get all of the details that I had out of my mouth as quick as possible so I'd jumble them up. He'd interrupt and tell me to start again which would piss me off. It's only been within the last year or less that I've disclosed my Dyspraxia.
    His first reaction was "well that explains a lot", but he didn't mean that in a negative way.
    I'm not entirely sure if he understands what it is, but since then he and his boss have been in contact with the Dyspraxia foundation for advice, which is something.

    So I understand that it can be difficult, and very frustrating.

    By the way, your teacher(s) sound like a-holes. You should talk to someone about them. Go over their heads. Make them feel embarrassed about the way they have acted.
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    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    His first reaction was "well that explains a lot", but he didn't mean that in a negative way.
    I get these reactions a lot too.

    I overheard (having really sensitive hearing does come in useful, sometimes!) a few friends last year discussing whether they thought I had Autism and I kinda went red. I was also hoping that my other friend who was sat next to them wouldn't say anything. I know the other two well enough that if they'd asked, I would have said something.
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    Had lecture today and we experienced what it's like to lose part of your hearing. It was really eye opening to see how it affects how you understand words and can communicate! I would advise anyone who is interested to look into how it sounds, maybe some YouTube videos could help!
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    Frustratingly, I also have hearing problems. But because I'm visually impaired, it has been assumed that part of the problem is that. It's a myth that those of us with visual impairments are sensitive to noise. My sensitivity to noise is because of blocked ear and the treatment used for that. I now have an additional hearing problem, which Audiology (who I saw today) seem to think will be solved by socialising. lol, ok. Too much noise is a migraine trigger.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Frustratingly, I also have hearing problems. But because I'm visually impaired, it has been assumed that part of the problem is that. It's a myth that those of us with visual impairments are sensitive to noise. My sensitivity to noise is because of blocked ear and the treatment used for that. I now have an additional hearing problem, which Audiology (who I saw today) seem to think will be solved by socialising. lol, ok. Too much noise is a migraine trigger.
    What? What's their rationale for this? I've never heard any 'advise' like this...
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    What? What's their rationale for this? I've never heard any 'advise' like this...
    I don't get it either. The thing is, I can hear. But, if I'm in a pub, (or somewhere similar where there's going to be a lot of people and noise) I can't clearly hear what's being said to me. And everytime I've been to somewhere like that, I've had to leave early because it just goes into one horrible loud noise.

    I was told to do it to "desensitise" myself. It's not going to happen and I can't see how it's going to work at all.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I don't get it either. The thing is, I can hear. But, if I'm in a pub, (or somewhere similar where there's going to be a lot of people and noise) I can't clearly hear what's being said to me. And everytime I've been to somewhere like that, I've had to leave early because it just goes into one horrible loud noise.

    I was told to do it to "desensitise" myself. It's not going to happen and I can't see how it's going to work at all.
    What odd and potentially awful advice to put you in a situation that is uncomfortable for you! Did they suggest anything else?
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    What odd and potentially awful advice to put you in a situation that is uncomfortable for you! Did they suggest anything else?
    No. I was then told there's actually nothing wrong. Something called auditory processing disorder has been suggested.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    No. I was then told there's actually nothing wrong. Something called auditory processing disorder has been suggested.
    They don't seem to know what it is! Oh okay, hmm, so not the physical hearing process (i.e not a problem with outer, middle, or inner ear) but the processing of sound in the brain I suspect?
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    No. I was then told there's actually nothing wrong. Something called auditory processing disorder has been suggested.
    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    They don't seem to know what it is! Oh okay, hmm, so not the physical hearing process (i.e not a problem with outer, middle, or inner ear) but the processing of sound in the brain I suspect?
    Yeah. And of course, people with ASD often have different ways of processing sensory inputs, so it could be linked to that, rather than a visual impairment... Sound is often sensitive for people with ASD
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    They don't seem to know what it is! Oh okay, hmm, so not the physical hearing process (i.e not a problem with outer, middle, or inner ear) but the processing of sound in the brain I suspect?
    Yes. There's nothing "wrong" in the sense that my eardrums are absolutely fine, there's no infection and my hearing test is normal. But the processing of sound is the problem and it's partly why if you say something, I've got to pause and think what you've just said. And then there's the fact that normal everyday sounds really bother me. I can't even have analogue clocks in my flat because they're so loud. You can't hear them; but I can hear them with the TV on and typing away on the laptop. And going out is difficult because too many sounds are quite painful.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Yes. There's nothing "wrong" in the sense that my eardrums are absolutely fine, there's no infection and my hearing test is normal. But the processing of sound is the problem and it's partly why if you say something, I've got to pause and think what you've just said. And then there's the fact that normal everyday sounds really bother me. I can't even have analogue clocks in my flat because they're so loud. You can't hear them; but I can hear them with the TV on and typing away on the laptop. And going out is difficult because too many sounds are quite painful.
    That sounds more like the sensory perception you hear about with people with ASD... I can't believe that the audiologist wouldn't take that into account or consider it
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Yes. There's nothing "wrong" in the sense that my eardrums are absolutely fine, there's no infection and my hearing test is normal. But the processing of sound is the problem and it's partly why if you say something, I've got to pause and think what you've just said. And then there's the fact that normal everyday sounds really bother me. I can't even have analogue clocks in my flat because they're so loud. You can't hear them; but I can hear them with the TV on and typing away on the laptop. And going out is difficult because too many sounds are quite painful.
    Have you found anything that does help with the noise levels, out of interest?
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    (Original post by shadowdweller)
    Have you found anything that does help with the noise levels, out of interest?
    No I haven't. I was told by Audiology just to use ear plugs, which don't really help. I've got hearing therapy next week; so shall see if they have any ideas.

    And a month after making that post, I was diagnosed with Auditory Processing Disorder. This means I can hear (well, I'm slightly deaf in one ear; but not deaf enough to require hearing aids) but my brain doesn't process sounds the way it should do. It usually means for me, if you say something, it can sometimes like something slightly different. IE, called sounds like cold. It also means as someone who plays the ukulele, some of the notes sound the same.
 
 
 
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