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Computer Science vs Economics vs Engineering watch

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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Would like to ask how much of computer science is programming/and or directly related to computers and how much of it is logical/maths ?

    And does it give you options to go into another degree(say after year 1) or even after , to another career ?


    And how much easier is it in general than engineering (say like maths difficulty and contact hours and study hours etc ?Thank you all as I am still unsure )
    Computer science is not a programming course. It will help you understand the logic of computing.
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    (Original post by carlos10000)
    Computer science is not a programming course. It will help you understand the logic of computing.
    Ok so it is just like applied maths ?
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Ok so it is just like applied maths ?
    Yeah, with some programming, database stuff, computer architecture theory, networking etc.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yeah, with some programming, database stuff, computer architecture theory, networking etc.

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    It's not 'with some programming', it's has a lot of programming, like 50+% will be teaching you languages. Then there's the other stuff like data structures etc


    Posted from TSR Mobile excuse my typos
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    It's not 'with some programming', it's has a lot of programming, like 50+% will be teaching you languages. Then there's the other stuff like data structures etc


    Posted from TSR Mobile excuse my typos
    No It's really not '50%' programming, at a reputable uni they won't teach the languages they'll teach the underlying principles behind the languages. If CS degrees were just programming, they'd be pretty useless as the languages taught will have changed significantly over time.

    That's like saying in engineering 50% of what you learn is AutoCAD and MATLAB.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    No It's really not '50%' programming, at a reputable uni they won't teach the languages they'll teach the underlying principles behind the languages. If CS degrees were just programming, they'd be pretty useless as the languages taught will have changed significantly over time.

    That's like saying in engineering 50% of what you learn is AutoCAD and MATLAB.
    Do you even do computer science, if you then either you're a not a good one or know what you're talking about because I'd expect you to be coding a lot. In every CS module apart from 1 or 2 like hardware/business stuff the things you learn are related back to programming. If you take an algorithms module your lecturer will still show you code and you will be expected to write code for those data structures even though you have a separate module teaching you how to write code. Of course you're not there to learn syntax but whats the point if you cant implement the ideas you learn into code? even if you take maths and you get taught matrices or something then you should go home and learn how to write a matrix class your self. You dont learn the theory just for the sake of it its so you can use it to solve problem, by coding... so I still stand by my point in saying you will be coding more than 50% of the time.

    That's like saying in engineering 50% of what you learn is AutoCAD and MATLAB.
    that's a crap comparison, you don't learn anything remotely related to autocad/matlab in other lectures apart from the one you actually do/use them in.
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Do you even do computer science, if you then either you're a not a good one or know what you're talking about because I'd expect you to be coding a lot. In every CS module apart from 1 or 2 like hardware/business stuff the things you learn are related back to programming. If you take an algorithms module your lecturer will still show you code and you will be expected to write code for those data structures even though you have a separate module teaching you how to write code. Of course you're not there to learn syntax but whats the point if you cant implement the ideas you learn into code? even if you take maths and you get taught matrices or something then you should go home and learn how to write a matrix class your self. You dont learn the theory just for the sake of it its so you can use it to solve problem, by coding... so I still stand by my point in saying you will be coding more than 50% of the time.



    that's a crap comparison, you don't learn anything remotely related to autocad/matlab in other lectures apart from the one you actually do/use them in.
    Did you miss the bit about learning the programming principles? CS doesn't teach you how to code, it teaches why code works and the theory behind how computation takes place.

    Cool beans man, an engineer definitely knows the proportion of time CompScis spend programming.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Did you miss the bit about learning the programming principles? CS doesn't teach you how to code, it teaches why code works and the theory behind how computation takes place.
    I'm not saying it teaches you how to code, I'm saying you will spend most of your time programming. wow I'm done

    Cool beans man, an engineer definitely knows the proportion of time CompScis spend programming.
    you dont know my background.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yeah, with some programming, database stuff, computer architecture theory, networking etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ok so would I be able focus mainly on the theoretical aspects (my field of interest) or will I still need to study a lot about programming and hardware stuff ?
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    (Original post by Oskar2000)
    Ok so would I be able focus mainly on the theoretical aspects (my field of interest) or will I still need to study a lot about programming and hardware stuff ?
    Most top univiersities will focus on the theoretical aspects, but you still do need to apply it via programming.

    I'd personally recommend the course I'm going for, which is Maths and Computer Science/Data Science - it's the best of both worlds. You focus on the more theoretical CS modules, whilst learning the Mathematics required in the more interdisciplinary topics like: cryptography, computer vision, machine learning etc. Definitely a lot more interesting, to me at least, than doing the hardware heavy/programming modules.
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    I'm not saying it teaches you how to code, I'm saying you will spend most of your time programming. wow I'm done


    you dont know my background.
    I do, I spoke to you before about this lmao.
 
 
 
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