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    (Original post by Indeterminate)
    Evaluate

    \displaystyle \int \dfrac{\sec(x)}{\sin(x) + 1}\ dx
    Is it at all sensible to use the rule whereby if the numerator is the derivative of the denominator, the integral can be expressed as ln(abs(denominator)) + c? Because the function is only present in the denominator (sec(x) = 1/cos(x)), I can differentiate the denominator which is now cos(x)*sin(x) + cos(x). Then divide by the derivative and do ln(abs(denom)). Wrong answer though.
    Other hints using unsophisticated methods?
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    The entire morning was spent watching MOTD, watching the news followed by a decent masturbation session. I am well-rounded; what's wrong with mathematics. Are you intellectually intimidated? I hope not, mathematics is interesting and if you disagree you can feck off.
    I'm an accountant, I like maths and all that good stuff, but sometimes you need a hobby. I'm not intellectually intimidated, I find intelligent stuff interesting as well.

    I can f off? Spoken like a true intellectual. I suggest you go to a finishing school in your spare time, it will be much more useful than a random maths question.
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    (Original post by i<3milkshake)
    I'm an accountant, I like maths and all that good stuff, but sometimes you need a hobby. I'm not intellectually intimidated, I find intelligent stuff interesting as well.

    I can f off? Spoken like a true intellectual. I suggest you go to a finishing school in your spare time, it will be much more useful than a random maths question.
    I am not an intellectual, and as you probably deduced, these questions are for someone who wants to compliment their a-level studies out of interest. You are in desperate need of w*nk, lighten up.
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    (Original post by lllllllllll)
    The info gives away that the first part can be done by IBP. When the first part is done, the second deduction is just an application using the same logic.
    I don't think that they want you to be using IBP here, given the hints.
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    (Original post by atsruser)
    I don't think that they want you to be using IBP here, given the hints.
    Yeah, you're correct. My bad
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    (Original post by driftawaay)
    Poor ivybridge and all those people on FB with their rainbow profile pictures...so many 14 year olds

    And poor you for thinking the animated non existent person in my profile picture is me. Embarrassing.
    :lol:

    I didn't know colours influenced maturity... Oh... they don't.
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    Check out "The Proof is Trival!" Some of the questions there are A Level suitable.
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    The fact you're asking for A level questions shows you're not good enough at maths to be wasting your own time you could be using to cover the A level syllabus.
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    (Original post by Masih ad-Dajjal)
    The fact you're asking for A level questions shows you're not good enough at maths to be wasting your own time you could be using to cover the A level syllabus.
    I'm above the A-level syllabus, m8 (notice how I am adopting an uneducated vocabulary here to reflect your level of education).
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    Solve the equation:

    \cos^2 \theta + \cos^2 2\theta + \cos^2 3\theta = 1
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    Pivot of the rope? The goat is tethered; I do not care what to and what its dimensions are. The only thing of value here is knowing the radius (ie the goat's rope's length), which is 4a. It forms a semi-circle. So 8pi*a^2 is the answer. The question is poorly phrased. QED.
    Surely the goat can go round the back of the barn...
    Spoiler:
    Show
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    (Original post by Pronged Lily)
    Solve the equation:

    \cos^2 \theta + \cos^2 2\theta + \cos^2 3\theta = 1
    Spoiler:
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    theta = (2k - 1)(pi/4) for k an integer is the only solution set right?
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    (Original post by Pronged Lily)
    Solve the equation:

    \cos^2 \theta + \cos^2 2\theta + \cos^2 3\theta = 1
    This is abuse; and yet not inherently difficult.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    Spoiler:
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    theta = (2k - 1)(pi/4) for k an integer is the only solution set right?
    That is one of the solution sets, but there are 2 others
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    What's the method for that question? I foolishly started messing around with identities, and I am sure there is a quicker way.
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    (Original post by Pronged Lily)
    That is one of the solution sets, but there are 2 others
    Ah I wrote a term too small and forgot about it, got the other answers now
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    (Original post by multiratiunculae)
    What's the method for that question? I foolishly started messing around with identities, and I am sure there is a quicker way.
    Getting everything in terms of cos(2theta) is fooling around with identities but doesn't take too long and works.
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    Anyone know what this question is asking because I am really confused Name:  1445936743078688701482.jpg
Views: 64
Size:  390.2 KB F3a) this is the diagram I drew but I don't know if I need to find x orbthe hypothenue thanks
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    (Original post by Emilyjmitchell)
    Try a STEP paper. Nothing is more challenging
    To be fair STEP I isn't that bad at all.
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    (Original post by PrimeLime)
    To be fair STEP I isn't that bad at all.
    I'm finding university maths easier than STEP I to be fair lol. STEP I is no STEP II or III but I find even a 2 in I way more impressive than an A* in Maths or Further Maths (not Additional Further A* with all the crazy mechanics you have to do though)
 
 
 
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