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What's a fair price for uni tuition fees? watch

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  • View Poll Results: What's a fair price for uni tuition fees?
    No fees at all
    536
    23.86%
    Less than £3,000 a year
    426
    18.97%
    £3,000 a year
    727
    32.37%
    £6,000 a year
    323
    14.38%
    £9,000 a year
    136
    6.06%
    More than £9,000 a year
    98
    4.36%

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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    You shouldn't have to pay anything, you don't pay for SATS, GCSE's or A-Levels so why all of a sudden you have to pay thousands of pounds for a degree...? seriously, how random is that? You gotta remember universities are making over 1 billion pounds annually off of us, and I don't mean that in terms of totality, I mean individual universities are making over 1 billion pounds annually off us...now...is that really necessary...?
    It's not random at all. Most countries provide free education to children (up to 18); that doesn't mean they should have to provide it to adults.

    What exactly do you mean by "universities are making a billion pounds annually off us"? Who is "us"? How are they making this money? I don't follow.
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    (Original post by Moonstruck16)
    Because university is a choice, not a right. You still would have to pay for all those things over the age of, I think, 19.

    But yes, the amount of money universities earn is stomach churning.

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    But you start university at the age of 18. Mature students are 21+, they're the ones who would have to pay
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    (Original post by Howard)
    It's not random at all. Most countries provide free education to children (up to 18); that doesn't mean they should have to provide it to adults.

    What exactly do you mean by "universities are making a billion pounds annually off us"? Who is "us"? How are they making this money? I don't follow.
    the people who pay ? who else would "us" be..?
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    (Original post by Howard)
    It's not random at all. Most countries provide free education to children (up to 18); that doesn't mean they should have to provide it to adults.

    What exactly do you mean by "universities are making a billion pounds annually off us"? Who is "us"? How are they making this money? I don't follow.
    Educationally speaking, a mature student is 21+ though... and they would have to pay for college too.
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    You shouldn't have to pay anything, you don't pay for SATS, GCSE's or A-Levels so why all of a sudden you have to pay thousands of pounds for a degree...? seriously, how random is that? You gotta remember universities are making over 1 billion pounds annually off of us, and I don't mean that in terms of totality, I mean individual universities are making over 1 billion pounds annually off us...now...is that really necessary...?
    The best way to achieve consistency is to privatise primary and secondary education.
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    (Original post by 41b)
    The best way to achieve consistency is to privatise primary and secondary education.
    Or not to privatise any of them..
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    You shouldn't have to pay anything, you don't pay for SATS, GCSE's or A-Levels so why all of a sudden you have to pay thousands of pounds for a degree...? seriously, how random is that? You gotta remember universities are making over 1 billion pounds annually off of us, and I don't mean that in terms of totality, I mean individual universities are making over 1 billion pounds annually off us...now...is that really necessary...?
    Where would the extra money come from if uni was free? And why should the tax payer have to pay for your uni education? They've already ahd to pay for 13 free years of education for you.
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    the people who pay ? who else would "us" be..?
    Well, taxpayers for a start. You don't imagine that universities survive solely on fees collected from students do you? They aren't making anything from you. You're paying some of the costs for a service - the balance is made up by taxpayers.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Where would the extra money come from if uni was free? And why should the tax payer have to pay for your uni education? They've already ahd to pay for 13 free years of education for you.
    I agree. Why should a young apprentice bricklayer have to shell out in taxes so someone else can sit in a classroom studying a liberal arts degree?

    Doesn't seem right to me.
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    Most people don't know the true costs of their education.
    It's all very well to say that a university "earns billions" but they are not profit making organisations. They spend (often more ) as they earn
    I know one university that is planning of sacking all of it's support staff and reemploying 80 % of them in order to save several million quid a year. Will that affect the students?

    Most universities now have halls that would be regarded as 5 star hotels 20 years ago.
    There seems to be a battle to get to the top accommodation wise. But 50 years ago a lot of students might have been at boarding school and experienced Spartan facilities.

    In the uk almost everybody goes "away" to university . Most people claim that it is because of the course, but a simple read of the "what uni has the fittest girls/boys or cheapest beer, best nightlife, implies that most are enjoying the freedom of being away from home.

    Many other countries have students at home, going to local unis and don't have all the overheads of effectively running a boarding facility for 10, ooo students. If local, students can save money.

    Unis run a daft system of being shut for a lot of the time, 3/5 of the year. But this allows research to be done ( and the uni is funded by research) so maybe have higher fees, 2 year degrees, more staff so they can take research leave, and local students meaning no accommodation.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Well, taxpayers for a start. You don't imagine that universities survive solely on fees collected from students do you? They aren't making anything from you. You're paying some of the costs for a service - the balance is made up by taxpayers.
    At least 20,000 students doing a full 3 years paying 27k each? do the math. The amount paid by the tax payer is relieved because the service is privatized.. the state still regards universities as a private sector as far I know
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    (Original post by domonict)
    Most people don't know the true costs of their education.
    It's all very well to say that a university "earns billions" but they are not profit making organisations. They spend (often more ) as they earn
    I know one university that is planning of sacking all of it's support staff and reemploying 80 % of them in order to save several million quid a year. Will that affect the students?

    Most universities now have halls that would be regarded as 5 star hotels 20 years ago.
    There seems to be a battle to get to the top accommodation wise. But 50 years ago a lot of students might have been at boarding school and experienced Spartan facilities.

    In the uk almost everybody goes "away" to university . Most people claim that it is because of the course, but a simple read of the "what uni has the fittest girls/boys or cheapest beer, best nightlife, implies that most are enjoying the freedom of being away from home.

    Many other countries have students at home, going to local unis and don't have all the overheads of effectively running a boarding facility for 10, ooo students. If local, students can save money.

    Unis run a daft system of being shut for a lot of the time, 3/5 of the year. But this allows research to be done ( and the uni is funded by research) so maybe have higher fees, 2 year degrees, more staff so they can take research leave, and local students meaning no accommodation.
    Very few British universities make any money at the bottom line. They are kept alive by tax payers money, not student fees, or research income.
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    At least 20,000 students doing a full 3 years paying 27k each? do the math. The amount paid by the tax payer is relieved because the service is privatized.. the state still regards universities as a private sector as far I know
    In terms of universities if you're charging no more than 9k you are kinda public sector and can still receive state funding for things, it's private proper when you go over that cap, but then you have to fend for yourself. Why don't you do the maths? up to a couple of hundred million a year; how much of that then goes into staff? How about maintenance? Research isn't cheap, nor is teaching, in many departments; how about putting money aside for expansions?
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    In terms of universities if you're charging no more than 9k you are kinda public sector and can still receive state funding for things, it's private proper when you go over that cap, but then you have to fend for yourself. Why don't you do the maths? up to a couple of hundred million a year; how much of that then goes into staff? How about maintenance? Research isn't cheap, nor is teaching, in many departments; how about putting money aside for expansions?
    You really think those hundreds of millions completely cover all those things you listed.. ? Yeah those things aren't cheap but blimey...
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    At least 20,000 students doing a full 3 years paying 27k each? do the math. The amount paid by the tax payer is relieved because the service is privatized.. the state still regards universities as a private sector as far I know
    I agree that the amount paid by the taxpayer is lowered because students are paying fees**. But that doesn't put universities in a profit making situation does it? They are not "making" money off you.

    **Now, lets talk about the fees themselves. The $27,000 is actually normally borrowed (again FROM the taxpayer) at artificially low interest rates and may, or may not be paid back. So you can't even truthfully claim that these fees are actually paid by the students - initially, the taxpayer pays them.

    So really, you are contributing sweet FA.
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    At least 20,000 students doing a full 3 years paying 27k each? do the math. The amount paid by the tax payer is relieved because the service is privatized.. the state still regards universities as a private sector as far I know
    540 million. Peanuts. To put it in context, I work on a construction site that's worth $5.2 billion.
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    A fair price is zero, but universities should be more selective about who they take in. University education should only be reserved for the academic elite or otherwise it is pointless.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I agree that the amount paid by the taxpayer is lowered because students are paying fees**. But that doesn't put universities in a profit making situation does it? They are not "making" money off you.

    **Now, lets talk about the fees themselves. The $27,000 is actually normally borrowed (again FROM the taxpayer) at artificially low interest rates and may, or may not be paid back. So you can't even truthfully claim that these fees are actually paid by the students - initially, the taxpayer pays them.

    So really, you are contributing sweet FA.
    That's true and the thing is, a lot of tax payers are the ones who are going to be sending their children off the university anyway in the first place so it just puts added pressure on their heads...unnecessary pressure, no? because the whole things would balance out otherwise. Honestly, to me it is one of the weirdest things. As you previously said education is free for 13 years so why all of a sudden now they have to complicate things for the remaining 3, haha ? It's just like ughh really .. lol
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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    You really think those hundreds of millions completely cover all those things you listed.. ? Yeah those things aren't cheap but blimey...
    I suggest you take a look at the financial statements of some universities. I have Sheffield Hallam up, being the first in the search. Net income, just shy of £250m last year, expenditure: over 150m for all the staff, looks like about 10m for depreciation, maybe a million or two in interest, 'other' about 70m. There was a 12m surplus, and then on top of that 34m of capital spending. What was the change in the balance sheet? Only 600,000.

    Try doing a bit if research before talking hokum

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    (Original post by MoniqueBubbles)
    That's true and the thing is, a lot of tax payers are the ones who are going to be sending their children off the university anyway in the first place so it just puts added pressure on their heads...unnecessary pressure, no? because the whole things would balance out otherwise. Honestly, to me it is one of the weirdest things. As you previously said education is free for 13 years so why all of a sudden now they have to complicate things for the remaining 3, haha ? It's just like ughh really .. lol
    Why just for the next three, why not for your whole life? To me, with the change of compulsory education to 18, the reason is obvious. Your compulsory education is paid for my the taxpayer, what you then go on to CHOOSE to do should be funded by the individual.

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