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    (Original post by G8D)
    I'm well aware. I don't advocate punishment. I advocate meritocracy. In most instances an individual who works less will have less worth to an employer than someone who works more.

    I'd suggest this scheme would be more damaging to a career than having a couple of kids and taking modest maternity leave due to the regularity.

    I think any such scheme should be voluntary and perhaps allow for SSP. This allows women to choose how to utilise it (fully, partially, tactically) with full knowledge as to how it may hinder or affect their careers.
    Again, punishing women for something that they can't control. Do you think women want period pains? I can't just decide to not have them. Some months I do have to take time off college. I don't want to and I shouldn't be punished for something beyond my control.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Why should I take a pay cut for my biology? It's not like I can just say "don't fancy having a period this month, I think I'll skip it." Nor can I just take stronger medication without risking overdose.

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    Why should men get paid less for the same amount of work just because they don't have ovaries? It's not like they can grow some.

    Taking an unpaid day or two off and making up the work another time is what plenty of working women already do, paying women to have periods only serves to decrease their career prospects as employers won't fancy paying their employees for not working.
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    (Original post by MildredMalone)
    And people wonder why modern femisnm is a figure of ridicule...
    Do you have periods? Have you ever suffered excruciating cramps and need to be hospitalised? No?

    Then shut it.

    Granted, not all women have period pain this severe, but for those that do I think this option would be much welcomed
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    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    Last period I had I took two 30/500 cocodamol, the ones I now take for the pain for my fibromyalgia and my mum takes for her arthritis, and my dad for sciatica, and then I threw them up because I was in too much pain.
    But you can't just take more, because they had started to be absorbed and if I'd gotten liver issues from too much paracetamol then I'd have had even more time off.
    Then I nearly passed out into the toilet, and my dad had to pretty much lift me into the car to get me home and then put me to bed.

    So unless you're suggesting some women (and it will be women in my situation who this would apply to) get some IV painkillers and shoot them up at their desks before going back to work, I don't think you thought this through at all.
    Completely unreasonable to expect employers to give leave to women every month like yourself when a tablet will solve the problem which is what you're doing now.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    Why should men get paid less for the same amount of work just because they don't have ovaries? It's not like they can grow some.

    Taking an unpaid day or two off and making up the work another time is what plenty of working women already do, paying women to have periods only serves to decrease their career prospects as employers won't fancy paying their employees for not working.
    They don't get paid less. The number of women with periods that are debilitatingly painful is actually quite small. Periods are a nuisance for most women.

    Something like this would benefit women who have very painful periods and it wouldn't harm men at all.

    If the time off was unpaid, why should I have to make up the work?

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    They don't get paid less. The number of women with periods that are debilitatingly painful is actually quite small. Periods are a nuisance for most women.

    Something like this would benefit women who have very painful periods and it wouldn't harm men at all.

    If the time off was unpaid, why should I have to make up the work?

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    The fact is that there is no telling who these women are and as such it is so open to abuse that it would be a massive deterrent for employers employing women.

    Making up the work would be up to the women, as by taking a day or two off they would probably have to make up the hours.
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    (Original post by Viva Emptiness)
    Quoted in the hope that people actually see it.
    but "regulations" "legislation" "rights" "unpaid leave" "SSP" !!!!! :facepalm:

    This is pretty decent IMO - if you know you're going to be grouchy around the 20th then you can make sure you don't schedule in work that involves dealing with other people and then if the usual grouchy escalates to "oh **** I've been kicked in the uterus" you can take a duvet day and make it up without a load of guilt. It's the sort of working environment where people thrive because they're trusted to understand their own capabilities and work around any obstacles to do a kickass job.

    Employers that offer flexibility to their staff and encourage staff to work to their strengths (and give the flexibility to take something back when you're having a *****y time or just not at your best *for any reason including periods* ) get that flexibility back (plus they get loyal, productive, happy staff who are willing to put in the extra effort when needed because they know they're valued).

    Some of the people posting on this thread will make appalling managers :nope:
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    The fact is that there is no telling who these women are and as such it is so open to abuse that it would be a massive deterrent for employers employing women.Making up the work would be up to the women, as by taking a day or two off they would probably have to make up the hours.
    What ARE you talking about?

    (Original post by PQ)
    It's not even time off that this company is talking about - it's flexible working and having a policy that states up front that using flexitime to work around period pains is acceptable.
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    (Original post by x-pixie-x)
    Completely unreasonable to expect employers to give leave to women every month like yourself when a tablet will solve the problem which is what you're doing now.
    Painkillers don't always work..
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    (Original post by PQ)
    What ARE you talking about?
    I know what the policy in question is, but it seems that the debate has moved on from that, and on to should women have paid leave if they have painful periods.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    Why should men get paid less for the same amount of work just because they don't have ovaries? It's not like they can grow some.

    Taking an unpaid day or two off and making up the work another time is what plenty of working women already do, paying women to have periods only serves to decrease their career prospects as employers won't fancy paying their employees for not working.
    How are men getting paid less?

    As someone mentioned, why are you making up the work if you're not being paid for it anyway? It's either you are paid for it and then you make it up at a later date or you are just not paid for it.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Painkillers don't always work..
    Fine if you want to take unpaid leave...but imagine if something like the NHS where most of the workforce are women offered them leave for their periods every month. It's discriminatory to give it to one woman over another so it wouldn't work.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    How are men getting paid less?

    As someone mentioned, why are you making up the work if you're not being paid for it anyway? It's either you are paid for it and then you make it up at a later date or you are just not paid for it.
    Because such a system is massively open to abuse.

    I have said before, if you miss a day's pay, it's in your best interest to make up for it.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    I know what the policy in question is, but it seems that the debate has moved on from that, and on to should women have paid leave if they have painful periods.
    I think you've misunderstood.

    Women can already take time off for painful periods. It's called sick leave. Excessive or regular sick leave is something that an employer can deal with as a disciplinary matter.

    Which post exactly on this thread has someone advocated *additional* sick leave for period pain? I've only seen people welcoming the flexibility mentioned in the company in question and stating that it's perfectly understandable and acceptable for women to take sick leave for painful periods. And about a dozen people misunderstanding that and wittering on why additional sick leave for period pain isn't fair.
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    (Original post by x-pixie-x)
    Fine if you want to take unpaid leave...but imagine if something like the NHS where most of the workforce are women offered them leave for their periods every month. It's discriminatory to give it to one woman over another so it wouldn't work.
    The option is available for all women, so how is it discriminatory?
    A care giver in severe pain wouldn't be very useful.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    I think you've misunderstood.

    Women can already take time off for painful periods. It's called sick leave. Excessive or regular sick leave is something that an employer can deal with as a disciplinary matter.

    Which post exactly on this thread has someone advocated *additional* sick leave for period pain? I've only seen people welcoming the flexibility mentioned in the company in question and stating that it's perfectly understandable and acceptable for women to take sick leave for painful periods. And about a dozen people misunderstanding that and wittering on why additional sick leave for period pain isn't fair.
    Everyone is entitled to sick leave so I don't see its relevance here. I personally don't think that a woman should be penalised for having period pain but if it's happening month upon month then they should be able to take unpaid leave without any disciplinary measures (but that's the sort of thing trade unions should be for).

    And what do you mean about "not fair". It's a debate and it's moved on. I don't think anyone disagrees that women should be able to take a sick day or two if they have an especially bad period, however, whether it should be mandatory is what people are debating.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    Because such a system is massively open to abuse.

    I have said before, if you miss a day's pay, it's in your best interest to make up for it.
    Sick leave is also open to abuse.

    You previously suggested that the woman take unpaid leave and also make up for it. Doesn't make sense. She should only make up for it if she's being paid.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    The option is available for all women, so how is it discriminatory?
    A care giver in severe pain wouldn't be very useful.
    Well I'm in NHS, majority of nurses in my unit are women, if they all took leave at same time the service would be very strained to say the least. Plus anyone could say they're in pain when they're not.
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    (Original post by x-pixie-x)
    Well I'm in NHS, majority of nurses in my unit are women, if they all took leave at same time the service would be very strained to say the least. Plus anyone could say they're in pain when they're not.
    It's very unlikely that everyone will have a painful period at the exact same time..

    The same can be said for sick leave tbh. Anyone can say they're sick when they're not.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Sick leave is also open to abuse.

    You previously suggested that the woman take unpaid leave and also make up for it. Doesn't make sense. She should only make up for it if she's being paid.
    People abusing sick leave would mean that they could potentially face a disciplinary. I don't think that women should be disciplined for having a few too many painful periods, however, some sort of "period leave" for women with especially bad periods is so open to abuse that it would only damage career prospects for women as a whole.

    Make up for it in the sense that they work for the hours that they missed (re: pay)
 
 
 
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