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The Hezzlington Cooking Blog - A student that eats like a King watch

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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    Hijacking OP's thread but this is more my domain since I eat instant noodles most days and have a life philosophy of never cooking for more than 45 minutes a week unless it's a special occasion or I'm guaranteed to get laid (aka a really special occasion).

    All things I have done to make instant noodles better
    • 2 packets of noodles and two tins of tuna make a great meal. More protein = more better
    • Add an egg to your noodles. this even works with pot noodles. Just kinda mash it up a bit and let it cook in the hot water while the noodles break up. This is perfectly safe probably.
    • Tabasco sauce. The bottle prevents you from pouring too much so so basically just turn that **** upside down and let it drip onto your noodles until you're bored. This can be combined with either of the above
    • Chopped mushrooms. Chop them fine enough so that they cook just by pouring hot water on them. Instant mushrooms! You don't want to waste valuable TSR time in the kitchen so a little time investment goes a long way. don't chop your finger!
    • Any kind of cold meat. I like to make a load of chicken or pork or whatever at the beginning of the week and just mix it with my noodles as the week goes on. These kinds of meats keep for ages so no worries on that front. Put salt on them if you're scared of a little bacteria.
    • Soy sauce. Same technique as tabasco but you'll seem more cultured. Get the dark one to take advantage of the placebo effect by making your noodles look less like instant noodles.
    • Invest in the Golden Wonder brand noodles. They're more expensive than the basics ones but they're also better and the pouches are tastier too. On the downside you need to microwave them after pouring in the hot water so they're not as convenient.


    Bonus round: something I haven't done yet but plan on trying:
    • Buy MSG powder. People will tell you this isn't healthy or that you're not running a Chinese restaurant or whatever. They are stupid pussies IMO and that's a fact. MSG is literally just flavour powder with some bonus sodium so go nuts with this.
    I'll try this but as someone who actually learns about the negative effects of MSG, I'll leave that one out.
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    (Original post by jenigma)
    I'll try this but as someone who actually learns about the negative effects of MSG, I'll leave that one out.
    Negative effects of MSG such as what?

    If consumed at small amounts (like in cooking) it has no negative effect. It's been used in Asian cooking for over 100 years.
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    Five Spice Duck

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    Ingredients



    Duck is very expensive, you don't hear of many students eating it. This is something I'd probably cook if I was on a date etc. These duck breasts weigh 350g and they cost £8 usually but they're on offer and I got them for £5. (Gressingham - really nice quality. You can get about 230g of duck breast at Aldi for about £3.70 I think but I can't vouch for quality as I've not tried them)

    I take the breasts out and pat them down gently as they're a bit slimy from being in the vacuum pack. I let them air out and increase in temperature for about 20 minutes. In the mean time, I put fennel seeds, cloves, schezwan pepper, ground cinnamon and star anise into the pestle & mortar and grind away. The aromas are absolutely incredible. My housemate could smell it from another room. The stuff is potent, so I only need a little for the breasts (about a tablespoon for two breasts) and I save the rest for later.

    I sharpen my new knife and score the skin. As you can see, I vastly underestimated how sharp my knife is. I applied quite literally no pressure, I just scratched the surface but the blade was so sharp I accidently cut into the meat for a few scores. When scoring, don't go deeper than the skin (for example pork belly/shoulder joint). I season generously with salt and brush with the 5 spice.



    I let the flavours infuse into the duck and in the mean time, I start to prepare everything else.



    Spring onions I slice into thin strips and place in iced water. This curls them up. Purely for aesthetic purposes as I'm using these as a garnish.



    I degerm the garlic and peel (without crushing, it took me ages to peel it...) and then I slice in half. I have some milk I need to use today, so I blanch the garlic in 100g of milk (I use grams for liquids, come at me). I slowly bring it to the boil on a low heat, then I discard the milk and wash the garlic with cold water. I then add 100g of fresh milk again and repeat the process 3 more times for a total of 400g of milk..for 2 cloves of garlic. It's tedious, but the purpose of this is to introduce a nutty, sweet characteristic into the garlic and since I have spare milk I thought why not. Once that's done, I take the garlic out, wash it with cold water and chop finely with the chillis and fresh ginger. (I didn't use Lazy Ginger this time - I was tempted, the garlic alone took about 30 minutes). Whilst all of this is happening, my pan is heating up.

    I wash the Pak choi and get that ready for later.

    The pan is nice and hot, with no oil I place the duck breasts into the pan (medium heat) skin side down. I let the fat render out, then I cook it for 3 minutes. I flip the breasts, then cook for 1 minute. I flip again...3 minutes. I flip again....1 minute. I repeat this process twice more for total cooking time of 24 minutes, no oven. This constant flipping ensures a beautiful crispy skin but pink inside as you don't really allow the bottom to cook for very long. I accidently upped the heat without thinking, so the colour on the inside isn't lovely and pink, but it still turns out amazingly juicy and soft, with perfect skin, so I'm still happy.



    Jasmine rice is now on the hob. Duck is done. I place on a cooling rack, discard the oil down the sink because **** the environment and my landlord. (I'm kidding). I cover the oil with flour and make like a little oil dough, then bake and eat. (I'm kidding). I just bin it once it's cooled.

    I add a little groundnut oil (nice and neutral flavour) to a clean pan, add the pak choi and try to instill a little colour. The pan wasn't hot enough so this fails. I add the mirin (a beautifully sweet rice wine) and the smell is amazing. I add the spring onions and some garden peas and immediately take off the heat.

    I combine the light soy sauce with the blanched garlic, chili, ginger and put in a bowl for a little garnish to go along with the spring onions.

    Guys, duck is served.

    Total cooking time: approx 2 hours.

    Total eating time: about 5 minutes.

    I had a lot of fun making this, hope you find it interesting!





















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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Negative effects of MSG such as what?

    If consumed at small amounts (like in cooking) it has no negative effect. It's been used in Asian cooking for over 100 years.
    Wouldn't touch it with a bargepole!
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    (Original post by Queen Cersei)
    Hahaha it all just adds to the suspense!
    Done! really enjoyed making it. I will not be doing it for a long time. It was stressful, lots of multi tasking/time keeping and my kitchen is now a real mess.

    So worth it though.
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    hezzlington


    Looks incredible :coma: although I'm not sure I'm convinced by the randomly dotted garden peas.. Why not a proper portion? :puppyeyes:
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    (Original post by IFoundWonderland)
    hezzlington


    Looks incredible :coma: although I'm not sure I'm convinced by the randomly dotted garden peas.. Why not a proper portion? :puppyeyes:
    Ooops, didn't explain. The mirin is a sugary rice wine, the alcohol evaporates and youre left with this syrup, the peas essentially caramelize. They're very sweet and crispy (with sugar).

    Because of this, they are very sweet and I don't want too many. They are actually stuck to the plate.

    Embrace the pea.
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    Your cooking looks lovely - wish I could do these. I can't afford to spend quite so much money as you though really but nice for a treat
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Your cooking looks lovely - wish I could do these. I can't afford to spend quite so much money as you though really but nice for a treat
    Thanks! It tastes better than it looks! Im working on presentation/aesthetic as its important.

    It's a shame some didn't like my pea placement.

    :cry2:
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Thanks! It tastes better than it looks! Im working on presentation/aesthetic as its important.

    It's a shame some didn't like my pea placement.

    :cry2:
    :lol:

    :console:

    U r an artist :adore:
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    BONUS POST

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    I wasn't going to post this, as it's purely experimental but why the hell not.

    My housemate got a beef joint from the reduced section (it wasn't labelled, but if I was to hazard a guess it would be a silverside joint). He let me cook it, so I first do the usual and dab the beef dry. I get a frying pan as hot as possible and then season the joint with coarse sea salt on all sides, little bit of groundnut oil in the pan and then I brown the joint on all sides, getting a lovely colour. Now, I decided to experiment with temperature as one of my favourite chefs uses this technique as well. I want the internal core of the beef at a temperature of 55 deg celsius. To do this, I preheat the oven to 60 degrees (I have an oven thermometer to ensure accuracy) and place the seared beef in a roasting tray. In it goes for approx 5 hours 20 minutes. The low gentle cooking causes the joint to develop a crust and it has such an intense flavour it's incredible. Now, as the heat is so gentle, the beef retains most of it's moisture. Virtually no juices escape so I can't make a gravy, but on the flipside the size of the joint remains unchanged. I have here a probe thermometer which I can check the internal temp. When I take it out, it's at 55 deg celius just like I planned. (Okay, it was 54.8, but if I kept it in for longer probably would of got to 55).

    Guys, this method can be used for roasting meats like chicken and lamb. Have a think about the temperature you roast your meat at. 180? 200? Why?

    Try something else, roast it for a few hours longer and see what happens. I'll do a roast chicken at some point using the same method to see what happens - I've never done a roast chicken before.

    My housemate steams some sweet potato and broc, whilst I....well...I just make a sandwich. I slice thick chunks and re-season with salt and this time pepper.





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    That rare steak sandwich is booming, well done is a crime IMO.
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    That rare steak sandwich is booming, well done is a crime IMO.
    Well done steak is a waste of time, money and beef.

    So I agree, it certainly is a culinary crime.
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    I'm gonna lose so much weight in September unless I learn how to cook fast!!
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    (Original post by Tabstercat)
    you're an idiot
    be nice!
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    (Original post by yoda123)
    I'm gonna lose so much weight in September unless I learn how to cook fast!!
    It's worth learning how It's fun and keeps me busy.
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    All i seen was "Food Blog" and thot :love:

    All the food looks scrumptious tho! Loveee cooking myself
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    and by the way if you have any fun dishes you enjoy making let me know and I'll give them a go.
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    (Original post by Tabstercat)
    you're an idiot
    Oh no! Some guy on the internet called me an idiot, I am so devastated )))))): :sleep:
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    x
    Any nice dishes involving mince meat other than the usual lasagna/meatballs?
 
 
 
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