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    (Original post by T1221)
    For my section on intrusive features I am using the case studies of Dartmoor (Batholith) and Isle of Arran (sills and dykes) but still a bit confused about how these form, where does the magma come from as no plate boundary is located there right?
    it's mid-plate tectonics (the fourth kind). and I'd choose just one of those case studies (I'm doing isle of arran), as batholith's, sills, and dykes tend to come as one...
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    (Original post by bjww1987)
    it's mid-plate tectonics (the fourth kind). and I'd choose just one of those case studies (I'm doing isle of arran), as batholith's, sills, and dykes tend to come as one...
    Ah ok thanks, so the magma intrusion just comes from the melting of sedimentary rock rather than the subduction of a plate?
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    (Original post by Lauraaa898)
    Everyone seems to be doing different? We've been told to do it by intrusive features, extrusive features and then seismic features and incorporate case studies? After doing 2 mocks and getting A* on both, this should be an effect methods to do??


    I feel like a lot of people are over complicating this.
    I've been taught to do it like this too! And we need a range of landforms the same way you've been taught too
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    (Original post by T1221)
    Ah ok thanks, so the magma intrusion just comes from the melting of sedimentary rock rather than the subduction of a plate?
    Bingo. See Wegener (1913) Hot Spot Theory. Attribute the rock change and mountainous formation to a weak point in the plate under which a Batholith has formed/been able to affect. Arran (as a CS) occurred at a time when Greenland broke away from Scotland (divergent plates). It would've likely occurred as a result of the plate trauma following that breakaway.
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    (Original post by Raisa97)
    I've been taught to do it like this too! And we need a range of landforms the same way you've been taught too
    It's the easiest way to do it imo. Don't get why other colleges are confusing it so much!
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    (Original post by Lauraaa898)
    It's the easiest way to do it imo. Don't get why other colleges are confusing it so much!
    What landforms are you mentioning in particular, because I learnt all the main ones but there's not enough time to get them all down.
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    We've just been told to approach it by case study or plate boundary. I don't think the structure is overly important as long as you get the information into your report and you have introduction, methodology, main body and conclusion.
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    (Original post by Raisa97)
    What landforms are you mentioning in particular, because I learnt all the main ones but there's not enough time to get them all down.
    Sills
    Dykes- sills and dykes brief description
    Batholiths
    Shield and strato volcanoes
    Calderas
    Lava plateaux
    Normal and revers faults (only briefly
    Transform faults
    Rift valleys
    Fold mountains

    You?😃
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    (Original post by GGB2016)
    We've just been told to approach it by case study or plate boundary. I don't think the structure is overly important as long as you get the information into your report and you have introduction, methodology, main body and conclusion.
    Do you not find it hard doing it by plate boundary? For our models, we had to explain the boundaries and then when we're talking about the features we say where they're likely to be found
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    for those doing it by plate boundary type, how many landforms do you include for each one?
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    (Original post by Lauraaa898)
    Sills
    Dykes- sills and dykes brief description
    Batholiths
    Shield and strato volcanoes
    Calderas
    Lava plateaux
    Normal and revers faults (only briefly
    Transform faults
    Rift valleys
    Fold mountains

    You?😃
    Sills &dykes
    Batholiths
    Plutons
    Shield,cinder,composite volcanoes
    Lava plateaux
    Fissures
    Faults
    Rift valleys
    Fold mountains
    Maybe quake lakes...
    Am I doing too much 😭
    Plus are you mentioning plate boundaries in detail?? I'm not I'm just referring to them as I go along e.g shield volcanoes form at divergent plate margins




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    (Original post by Raisa97)
    Sills &dykes
    Batholiths
    Plutons
    Shield,cinder,composite volcanoes
    Lava plateaux
    Fissures
    Faults
    Rift valleys
    Fold mountains
    Maybe quake lakes...
    Am I doing too much 😭
    Plus are you mentioning plate boundaries in detail?? I'm not I'm just referring to them as I go along e.g shield volcanoes form at divergent plate margins




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    Our arms are going to ache so much after this exam 😂. And yeah, we were told to use plate boundaries as our models in the introduction but I'm just explaining them briefly really. No need to go into much detail
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    Could anyone tell me about the East African Rift Valley please? (ie. What plate boundary and what landforms are created)
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    Hi guys,
    One of my main case studies is the North Island Volcanic Plateau in New Zealand, but I am suddenly panicking that it's not relevant. It's a pyroclastic plateau as opposed to a lava plateau. The case study has a range of features, e.g Lake Taupo in the caldera of the former stratovolcano, mount Taupo, but I'm just worried it is somehow wrong? I was going to compare it briefly to the Deccan plateau if it seems relevant. Sorry for such a long winded question! Thanks!
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    (Original post by rachel___)
    Hi guys,
    One of my main case studies is the North Island Volcanic Plateau in New Zealand, but I am suddenly panicking that it's not relevant. It's a pyroclastic plateau as opposed to a lava plateau. The case study has a range of features, e.g Lake Taupo in the caldera of the former stratovolcano, mount Taupo, but I'm just worried it is somehow wrong? I was going to compare it briefly to the Deccan plateau if it seems relevant. Sorry for such a long winded question! Thanks!
    I'm using that too but I read on nationalgeographic.org/enycopedia/plateu that it is a volcanic plateau so I was going to use that term
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    (Original post by Lauraaa898)
    Do you not find it hard doing it by plate boundary? For our models, we had to explain the boundaries and then when we're talking about the features we say where they're likely to be found
    I'll probably avoid doing it by plate boundary and stick to case studies. It just depends if they mention plate boundaries in the question.
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    (Original post by Seanaust)
    I'm using that too but I read on nationalgeographic.org/enycopedia/plateu that it is a volcanic plateau so I was going to use that term
    Thank you! I think the term 'volcanic plateau' refers to both pyroclastic and lava plateaus, i.e there are two types of volcanic plateaus. But if we relate it back to the question it should be fine. Thanks again
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    (Original post by GGB2016)
    I'll probably avoid doing it by plate boundary and stick to case studies. It just depends if they mention plate boundaries in the question.

    I doubt they'd do that anyway or else it would've steered us towards looking at the landscapes at different boundaries
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    Hi, for the conclusion. Why is the report or the title complex, as you have to comment on it's complexity. Thank you
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    (Original post by Randomuser12343)
    Could anyone tell me about the East African Rift Valley please? (ie. What plate boundary and what landforms are created)
    Hi, The east African Rift Valley is at a constructive plate boundary and the landscapes that are created are normal faults (from seismic extension) and then the fault scarp/horst/graben that come along with faulting. There tends to be some volcanic activity where the plates are splitting but you don't need to mention that. Then, sometimes if the rift valley is near a sea (EAR is) It can become an oceanic rift valley when the sea floods in.

    This was useful for me too because it helps me sum it up in my head!
    Hope that helps
 
 
 
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