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    Lol I get extra time but I don't think my disability affects how fast I can solve problems. Whatever, exploit the system i guess.
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    (Original post by Mazzy95)
    There's so many ignorant comments on this thread! Wow. It's sad that people can't just be pleased that those who need help with their education are getting help and have empathy towards those that need help but aren't getting any. Consistently people on this thread are complaining that students regularly abuse the system. I can only speak from experience with my schools and college but when I was in education, extra time was minimal amongst students and the ones who I knew who told me the reasons why, genuinely needed it. I think there is just a lack of empathy and a lot of judgement. Can you really KNOW that these said students don;t need or deserve their extra time or other exam requirements. Yes there will be a few who do abuse the system, like with anything but people are talking about it as though it is a majority.
    this^^^^


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    (Original post by GUMI)
    Lol I get extra time but I don't think my disability affects how fast I can solve problems. Whatever, exploit the system i guess.
    Not the best attitude as it just reinforces the opinions of many people on this thread that the majority of people have extra time don't need or deserve it. Which isn't true lots of people who take extra time do genuinely need it.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Yes they do. I don't know which schools/colleges you are referring to, but generally speaking, you won't be awarded extra time for messy handwriting, unless perhaps it's a consistent issue that's been affecting you for most of your school life. You can't just wait until exams and then say you want a laptop or a word processor. Doesn't quite work like that.
    Regardless of what your issue is (extra time, scribe, laptop, etc) you have to provide some sort of evidence. You'd normally need a diagnosis too.

    My handwriting is a bit messy and I never got (because quite frankly, I didn't need it) anything for it. We've now worked out what the issue is and the adjustment I need for that is coloured paper. (because it's not quite so bright)
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    It's definitely a just system in theory, but I can see a few taking advantage of it. Extra time is not allowed for those with special needs where I live, unfortunately.
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    (Original post by Mazzy95)
    Not the best attitude as it just reinforces the opinions of many people on this thread that the majority of people have extra time don't need or deserve it. Which isn't true lots of people who take extra time do genuinely need it.
    kk
    I don't think it's fair per se, but I think it is necessary because there are people who need extra time, and maybe I do need it, and we can't necessarily draw a fine line between those who need it and those who don't.
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    Do I think it's fair that people get extra time because of 'slow handwriting' or get laptops AND extra time because they have bad handwriting? No!! Especially considering people type faster than they write, it's a complete joke that I have to rush to finish an essay, while someone else gets extra time and a laptop because they can't be bothered to write neatly 😡Obviously if people have genuine disabilities that prevent them for completing an exam within the allotted time then I think it's fair, but unless that's the case, I don't think extra time should be given out.
    Your muddling the areas up. No-one gets given laptops for free as I gather how you are putting it. The only people I have seen use laptops are this student that was partially blind, and this other kid who broke his arm. Also afaiaa spellcheck is disabled and for subjects like maths and physics and chemistry etc. where there are scarce writing in compononets then having a laptop wouldn't be beneficial. I am allowed to use one, but would be more hassle. So elect not too.
    (Original post by morgan8002)
    I think sometimes it is necessary, but it's not a perfect system. Some people will need more than 25% extra and for some 25% is too much and gives them an unfair advantage.It's also too untargeted. For example if you get extra time on the basis of slow and messy handwriting then you should be given it in more heavy writing subjects like A-level biology, but shouldn't be allowed it in A-level maths.
    This is true. What was significant is at my old school there was a good 20 kids who got extra time. And a lot of them were chinese or some variation of. They were mostly lse,oxbridge etc. students too and some of them said they didn't have disabilities haha.Also this kid got more time for hay fever which is just ridiculous. May as well give everyon et with a minor cold then :P
    (Original post by Compost)
    People do.
    Do they get the full .25 or only 10% more?
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    (Original post by GUMI)
    kk
    I don't think it's fair per se, but I think it is necessary because there are people who need extra time and we can't necessarily draw a fine line between those who need it and those who don't.
    True, education can't really judge those who get extra time but 'seem like they don't need it' as they can't really know for sure. It can be difficult to pinpoint people that don't have physically obvious needs which I think is the reason why people are saying that 'lots' of people exploit the system. I think it's just that their reason for extra time isn't physically obvious so people make informed judgments. (Like the majority of people within society enjoy making towards each other.)
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    (Original post by GUMI)
    Lol I get extra time but I don't think my disability affects how fast I can solve problems. Whatever, exploit the system i guess.
    I am in a similar situation, but I tend to not think about it much. Others get it unfairly some don't nothing I can do about it. All uniform I guess.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Yes they do.
    Well I've looked and I can't find it.

    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    You can't just wait until exams and then say you want a laptop or a word processor. Doesn't quite work like that.
    In theory that is 100% accurate and they are trying to tighten up on the rules, but access arrangements are meant to be the 'normal way of working' so should be established long before the exams. Why are 50,000 applications made in the month before the Summer deadline?

    I'm not saying for a moment that access arrangements should be banned, but the current system is a very blunt instrument. The assessments have become more standardized but I would love to know if there is any statistically significant evidence that having a standardised score of 84 in (say) rapid phonological naming means that you need 25% more time in a (say) maths exam. I suspect not. Equally, we are all human and the system is open to cheating by the students, pressure from the parents and flexible application of the rules by the schools.

    Even if we actually decided what exams are for I'm not sure I could design a fairer system, but the current one has many flaws.
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    I don't mean to brag but there's no way you can say my slow processing speed is because I'm stupid and that I should be doing foundation papers when I actually find things like A level a doddle.

    Autism has been shown to cause genius levels of IQ as well as slower processing speeds so your statement is quite false.
    Why you're post is completely irrelevant:

    1) I didn't mention being stupid.
    2) Exams don't test IQ.
    3) If you do well at maths exams but bad in English then that shows you do not need extra time. Extra time is for those that can't do well in any exam because of a disability.
    4) Autism is not an intellectual disability.
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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    they get the full .25 or only 10% more?
    They have changed the system (back again). If you get extra time then it is always at least 'up to 25%'.
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    (Original post by xylas)
    4) Autism is not a disability.
    Actually it is
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    If you had extra time in your exams, (for those who don't already have it) do you genuinely think you would get significantly better grades?
    It's not about getting significantly better grades, its about achieving your full potential.
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    (Original post by Anmol_.)
    I don't think so unless you have a disability. Having extra time because you write too slow is wrong.
    It is right when you are dysgraphic or dyslexic (can't process your thoughts down on paper and spell properly)
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    (Original post by Compost)
    Well I've looked and I can't find it.

    I'm not saying for a moment that access arrangements should be banned, but the current system is a very blunt instrument. The assessments have become more standardized but I would love to know if there is any statistically significant evidence that having a standardised score of 84 in (say) rapid phonological naming means that you need 25% more time in a (say) maths exam. I suspect not. Equally, we are all human and the system is open to cheating by the students, pressure from the parents and flexible application of the rules by the schools.

    Even if we actually decided what exams are for I'm not sure I could design a fairer system, but the current one has many flaws.
    With mine, I was in the 99% percentile for some and in the 1% percentile for some others.
    I am not sure how people could cheat in the actual diagnosis stuff not for bad handwriting etc.
    Won't the confidence intervals/standard deviations be able to inidcate if someone is messing around or not :P
    (Original post by Compost)
    They have changed the system (back again). If you get extra time then it is always at least 'up to 25%'.
    Do you think 25% is too much/little?

    In US they give up to 100% more time, and the restrictions are so lax as in having say only ADHD, warrants the same extra time as having say 3 or 4 disabilities.
    And in other countries, I believe they do not allow it.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Actually it is
    Appreciate you just replying to a small part of my post.

    Just so people don't have to take your word for it, here is the main page about autism on NHS choices:

    Autism: the facts

    On its own, autism is not a learning disability or a mental health problem. But some people with autism have an accompanying learning disability, learning difficulty or mental health problem.

    Autism is a spectrum condition. This means that while all people with autism share certain difficulties, the condition affects each person differently.

    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Autism/Pa...moverview.aspx
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    (Original post by Tinka99)
    I have learning difficulties and sitting my GCSE's this year and if I did not get 25% extra time, a reader and a quieter room I would fail as I generally am disadvantaged.
    Totally get you...same here...and it's nice to have people who understand other than those who don't understand what it is and why it's there and they just have to go and dis it..
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    (Original post by xylas)
    Appreciate you just replying to a small part of my post.

    Just so people don't have to take your word for it, here is the main page about autism on NHS choices:

    Autism: the facts

    On its own, autism is not a learning disability or a mental health problem. But some people with autism have an accompanying learning disability, learning difficulty or mental health problem.

    Autism is a spectrum condition. This means that while all people with autism share certain difficulties, the condition affects each person differently.

    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Autism/Pa...moverview.aspx
    The first sentence of the link you provided clearly states that autism is a lifelong developmental disability
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    http://www.autism.org.uk/about/what-is.aspx

    First sentence says "Autism is a lifelong developmental disability"
    Yes but I was referring to intellectual disability not social disability.
 
 
 
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