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What happened to women's rights in the muslim world? watch

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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    Thats sounds pretty islamophobic to me. That part of history should not be allowed to be recalled because its islamophobic
    :rofl:

    Yea you've got a point, I wouldn't want the PC-police coming after me!
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    :rofl:

    Yea you've got a point, I wouldn't want the PC-police coming after me!
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    What does a man do.

    Apart from the difference in genitals, I don't see how men and women are different.
    Be realistic majority of women do not have same physical strength as men. And majority men do not have same capacity as woman.

    The Holy Qur’an states that all believers, without distinction, are equal and that only righteous deeds elevate one person above another. Muslims therefore have an immense respect for righteous and pious men and women. Islamic history also tells us that men and women both served in many capacities from being teachers, doctors, leaders and even as soldiers in battle when Muslims were under attack.

    Islam however also recognises that such equality does not mean that men and women are the same. It notes their different physical and emotional strengths and in view of this sets out their key roles in life. The roles are therefore not a question of superiority or inferiority, but a question of natural capacity and proper functioning.

    http://islamicfaq.org/equality/index.html

    But by equality what do you mean so like do you want to see that women doing the exact same things as men?
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    (Original post by Lord Samosa)
    I was talking about women who choose to dress like that, some do and people still insult it. The issue here is the regime of these countries dictating how they can dress, they're being oppressed by not being given the choice to wear what they want. The issue isn't what they're wearing.

    I'm not accusing you of attacking anybody btw
    It is the regime, ofcourse it is. The way the women are dressed is a byproduct of that oppressive regime, however if a woman who chose to dress like that, a free women not restrained by any kind of political/ cultural oppression then good for her! I'm happy for her, she should dress how she feels best.

    But if it's under political influence then no, I find it sad.
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    (Original post by Erebor)
    Of course not, as the prophet clearly stated, women are mentally deficient.
    Yeah you do not need any explanantion as you have interpreted it yourself. So your saying they can.
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    (Original post by h333)
    Be realistic majority of women do not have same physical strength as men. And majority men do not have same capacity as woman.

    The Holy Qur’an states that all believers, without distinction, are equal and that only righteous deeds elevate one person above another. Muslims therefore have an immense respect for righteous and pious men and women. Islamic history also tells us that men and women both served in many capacities from being teachers, doctors, leaders and even as soldiers in battle when Muslims were under attack.

    Islam however also recognises that such equality does not mean that men and women are the same. It notes their different physical and emotional strengths and in view of this sets out their key roles in life. The roles are therefore not a question of superiority or inferiority, but a question of natural capacity and proper functioning.

    http://islamicfaq.org/equality/index.html

    But by equality what do you mean so like do you want to see that women doing the exact same things as men?
    As a girl I'm just as emotionally capable as a boy, I can handle stressful situations as well as a guy can. I have mental strength and capacity as a guy does.

    Our bodies are different but I can perform equally. If worked the same job as a man, I can perform just as well or better.

    What is my key role in life as a woman then? because I've already told you I'm just as emotionally capable as a guy is...

    Our "natural capacity" is dictated by how we live our lives, not by what we're told out natural capacity is.
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    (Original post by Erebor)
    What's even more sad is that muslim women think this way too, but I guess this is what happens when you've been indoctrinated from the second you're born and on top of that you live in fear of consequences from your family and community . It's disheartening reading all these threads on here with kids wanting to leave islam but being petrified to do it. They live in the UK but at the same time they are stuck in their parallel universe which is quite surreal in a 21st century modern democracy.
    So are you saying I should go against my will and choice to practise Islam and dress how I want.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    It is the regime, ofcourse it is. The way the women are dressed is a byproduct of that oppressive regime, however if a woman who chose to dress like that, a free women not restrained by any kind of political/ cultural oppression then good for her! I'm happy for her, she should dress how she feels best.

    But if it's under political influence then no, I find it sad.
    Well we're at an agreement here I just feel that changes in these countries have to be slow and desired from the people or the women to speak up themselves too. Forcing sudden change doesn't work, which is why these countries took such a huge, sudden step backwards
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    As a girl I'm just as emotionally capable as a boy, I can handle stressful situations as well as a guy can. I have mental strength and capacity as a guy does.

    Our bodies are different but I can perform equally. If worked the same job as a man, I can perform just as well or better.

    What is my key role in life as a woman then? because I've already told you I'm just as emotionally capable as a guy is...

    Our "natural capacity" is dictated by how we live our lives, not by what we're told out natural capacity is.
    I never said all women can not do what men can do but majority. And same for men as they are emotionally and physically different.

    For example, we are different as if us girls get pregnant we can not do what men can do at that time and so it is best for us to rest and be careful. Also some woman who are working and have a husband that works as well....when they have a child sometimes they decide to leave work competely as they want to focus on child completely. So what if then the husbands says no you have to work no matter what as we are "equal" then isnt that harsh? Men do not have this issue though.

    Don't get me wrong majority men also can not really do everything a woman does like them.

    What I am trying to say is that somehow majority of men and women are not entirely equal when it comes to life duties/activities all the time.
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    (Original post by Khaar)
    At the very least we can say the women at the time of the prophet covered themselves in a similar manner straight after the verses regarding covering up were revealed. If they were misinterpreting what God wanted then they had Allah's messenger to correct them but nothing was said against the women's interpretation. There is a hadith which shows this and I'll find it tomorrow Insha'Allah.

    If you can't support your Muslim sisters who want to simply follow in the footsteps of people like Ayesha ra, then please don't hate them and degrade them online because I certainly doubt you would openly diss the Prophet's wives for their clothes.
    I'm pretty sure veil wearing etc was commonplace long before Islam

    I support women who need to realise there is more to them than just a black cloak,I don't support archaic ideas.

    Is that the ideal life to follow though? Have you not noticed a link between poverty and a lack of female rights in many Muslim countries?

    I'm vocal about my views, even in the presence of my friends who wear hijab/abaya. They're open to explaining why they wear it :dontknow:

    I didn't know that having some random stranger online question your beliefs was more degrading than covering your face every time you go out in public.
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    (Radical) Islam happened. Duh.
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    I support women who need to realise there is more to them than just a black cloak,I don't support archaic ideas.
    An idea being archaic doesn't necessarily mean that it is wrong.

    As for supporting women, perhaps the lack of any discerning features apart from the eyes, means a man is less likely to judge a woman on appearances, as they subconsciously do.

    Is that the ideal life to follow though? Have you not noticed a link between poverty and a lack of female rights in many Muslim countries?
    Have you not noticed a link between ex-colonies and poverty? Have you not noticed a link between people of colour and poverty? Have you not noticed the link between "contentment" and poverty in these third world countries?

    What I'm saying is that you can't just claim the cause of poverty, within Muslim countries is down to a lack of rights for females.
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    Ohhh, I misinterpreted your words and accidentally repped you. My bad. The OP knows how TSR works.

    1. Post something immigrant/muslim related
    2. Some people reply back explaining something
    3. Gang of islamophobes join in bashing Islam from all directions.

    Any idiot KNOWS how these things go down. OP ain't looking for an "intellectual discussion".
    Everyone has the right to criticise a religion. The fact that you've screamed Islamophobia immediately speaks volumes and shows you're probably using the victim card. You want to back up your faith? Fine. But at least deal with it properly.
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    You could ask the same thing for Muslims in the UK tbh

    When my grandfather immigrated here, immigrant Muslim women wouldn't wear niqabs or abayas or anything. Many didn't even feel the need to wear a headscarf (my mum didn't in my childhood, now she does :confused:)
    I saw something similar in India. When my grandmother was growing up, she told me she never actually saw anyone with niqabs or abayas either. She saw a couple of women who covered their heads with a cloth but that was it.

    In the summer we both went to Agra and we saw a bunch of Muslim women. Every single one of them was covered head to toe in black (I couldn't even see their eyes or anything). How they managed to cover themselves up in black in such humidity I'm never going to know but I'm surprised they didn't faint from the heat.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    I saw something similar in India. When my grandmother was growing up, she told me she never actually saw anyone with niqabs or abayas either. She saw a couple of women who covered their heads with a cloth but that was it.

    In the summer we both went to Agra and we saw a bunch of Muslim women. Every single one of them was covered head to toe in black (I couldn't even see their eyes or anything). How they managed to cover themselves up in black in such humidity I'm never going to know but I'm surprised they didn't faint from the heat.
    I had the fortune of being in Agra just two weeks ago and that was not my experience at all. Out of the thousands of people that I saw, there was only one that was wearing the Niqaab (I don't know if you can actually call it a Niqaab because some of them just wrap their scarf around their face leaving their eyes and nose uncovered).

    As for the dark colours, it seems unnatural at first but Bedouins and other desert-dwellers have been doing that for generations. Apparently the colour black acts similar to how a thermos would, in that the inner part remains cool, whilst the outer part (the black part) absorbs the heat.
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    (Original post by TheArtofProtest)
    I had the fortune of being in Agra just two weeks ago and that was not my experience at all. Out of the thousands of people that I saw, there was only one that was wearing the Niqaab (I don't know if you can actually call it a Niqaab because some of them just wrap their scarf around their face leaving their eyes and nose uncovered).

    As for the dark colours, it seems unnatural at first but Bedouins and other desert-dwellers have been doing that for generations. Apparently the colour black acts similar to how a thermos would, in that the inner part remains cool, whilst the outer part (the black part) absorbs the heat.
    Depends on where in Agra. I was at the Taj Mahaal and I saw a bunch of them, and they were speaking in Hindi so I'm assuming they were Indian.
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    (Original post by Butternuts96)
    I would be willing to bet my first-born daughter
    Now there's a surprise. :rolleyes:
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    A provocative topic. Both is wrong. Roaming the streets undressed nor fully closed is not freedom. These pics are quite exaggerated. Yes there are these kind of clothing styles but its not such widespread as imposed in OP.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Depends on where in Agra. I was at the Taj Mahaal and I saw a bunch of them, and they were speaking in Hindi so I'm assuming they were Indian.
    I was also at the Taj Mahal.

    As for speaking Hindi, the next time I go to India and I hear people in Delhi speak Urdu (which seems to be far more commonplace than Hindi), I'll assume that they are all Pakistani's, shall I?
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    You can blame this politically too. People like Amin started to preach in islamic fundamentalism in Afghanistan in the 70s. What had left was a war torn country as USSR invaded and it accelerated the growth of islamic fundamentalism. Western intervention essentially helped give islamic countries a reason for becoming so fundamentalist.

    The issue at hand is incredibly complex. Blaming it on Islam as all the islamophobes here do is very lazy, ignorant and is out of spite.

    In all honesty, intelligent discussions with deeply complex issues like the one here isnt possible on TSR where people think so simplistically and dont fully understand the problem at hand. No to mention the Islamophobia and Xenophobia that people have on TSR.
 
 
 
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