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40% teenagers don't pass English or Maths Watch

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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I'm not really sure where you get that idea. My parents were always very "strict" with me and my siblings. It wasn't a case of simply "threatening", it was very much a case of following through. Yet I have a master's, one of my brothers is doing a phd, and the other two are working on their bachelor's.

    Personally, I think parents should adopt a parenting style that is consistent, that's the main requirement.
    It was just a general point as an aside; but if I remember right it is what research suggests? Also as a general rule, rather than determining each individual case.But you're right, I suppose that it is consistency which is key, and I suppose that is a big part of it maybe. Though strict, would you say uncompromising, inflexible, and undemocratic?

    My parents on the other hand are strict but relatively inconsistent, and it hasn't been particularly auspicious, though they have been pushy to do well even if they have no concept or understanding of anything that I do.

    What do your parents do, if you don't mind me asking? (interested a bit in all the psychology stuff and the determinants of academic success etc.).
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    I just about managed a C at GCSE English, I always found English hard at school though and that's due to me having dyslexia. On the other hand, I've managed to get an A* in Maths
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    Wait what 40% dont get a C in English and Maths? Dammnm thought it was like 15% or something
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    Some people are being kinda ignorant about this smh. It's honestly so annoying when people assume that those who didn't pass was because they didn't revise or they didn't care.

    I failed GCSE English language the first time not because I didn't revise, but it was because I genuinely wasn't good at it. Sure I may be a book worm and my spellings may be fantastic but there were other aspects of english I wasn't good at such as grammar. You got to take into other factors as well like the fact that english isn't my first language and how my mum struggled with english when she was at school, this may have impacted me too.

    Now as for my best friend she was the opposite of me because she passed english but failed Maths. Yes she's hard working and always trying her best but the reason why she failed Maths was because it's a subject she always struggled with ever since primary school. In high school the Maths department weirdly only focused on helping the top and middle sets, leaving out the bottom set so it meant she didn't get much support.

    Just because majority find something easy it doesn't mean it's the same for everyone.
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    (Original post by 1secondsofvamps)
    Some people are being kinda ignorant about this smh. It's honestly so annoying when people assume that those who didn't pass was because they didn't revise or they didn't care.

    I failed GCSE English language the first time not because I didn't revise, but it was because I genuinely wasn't good at it. Sure I may be a book worm and my spellings may be fantastic but there were other aspects of english I wasn't good at such as grammar. You got to take into other factors as well like the fact that english isn't my first language and how my mum struggled with english when she was at school, this may have impacted me too.

    Now as for my best friend she was the opposite of me because she passed english but failed Maths. Yes she's hard working and always trying her best but the reason why she failed Maths was because it's a subject she always struggled with ever since primary school. In high school the Maths department weirdly only focused on helping the top and middle sets, leaving out the bottom set so it meant she didn't get much support.

    Just because majority find something easy it doesn't mean it's the same for everyone.
    But looking at the statistics, are you saying all 40% of students are like this. I really don't think so, so we're trying to assess the norm here, excluding factors such as first language etc.

    However, i do agree with you when you say teachers focus on higher sets than bottom sets. This really sucked, I was bottom set english for two years and I managed to do better than the majority of the year, achieving an A in language and literature. What really motivated me to do well even thought I was in bottom set, the people that were in my set were a bunch of idiots, messing around, swearing at the teacher etc. They only gave us a teacher that could cope with bad behaviour, not necessarily a good one.
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    But looking at the statistics, are you saying all 40% of students are like this. I really don't think so, so we're trying to assess the norm here, excluding factors such as first language etc.

    However, i do agree with you when you say teachers focus on higher sets than bottom sets. This really sucked, I was bottom set english for two years and I managed to do better than the majority of the year, achieving an A in language and literature. What really motivated me to do well even thought I was in bottom set, the people that were in my set were a bunch of idiots, messing around, swearing at the teacher etc. They only gave us a teacher that could cope with bad behaviour, not necessarily a good one.
    Obviously not all 40% of student are like this, I was just speaking about mine and my friend's experience of it. But what I was trying to say was that there are so many aspects to think about people shouldn't say stuff like "they're dumb" or " they didn't revise".

    My school got put into "special measures" during either year 10 or 11, now I'm not sure how much that would've impacted things but in my year only 46% of students achieved A*-C grades including Maths and english. The year group before only got 23%
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    Parents should be more involved and schools be a bit more stricter. I'm not really familiar with education system in the UK but my nephew attended a school here and I rarely seen him doing any homework :erm: How often do students here get homework? If such thing even exists :mmm:
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    It was just a general point as an aside; but if I remember right it is what research suggests? Also as a general rule, rather than determining each individual case.But you're right, I suppose that it is consistency which is key, and I suppose that is a big part of it maybe. Though strict, would you say uncompromising, inflexible, and undemocratic?

    My parents on the other hand are strict but relatively inconsistent, and it hasn't been particularly auspicious, though they have been pushy to do well even if they have no concept or understanding of anything that I do.

    What do your parents do, if you don't mind me asking? (interested a bit in all the psychology stuff and the determinants of academic success etc.).
    My dad is a plumber and my mum is a receptionist. Neither really had much education and, like yours, they have always been pushy to do well. Sometimes crazy pushy (my mum would go through my maths homework when I was little and if I got one wrong she would make me do the whole thing again - it was pretty ridiculous ). But they have always been consistent; my siblings and I know what is expected and we do it.

    You might find Baumrind, 1971, interesting. She says that authoritative parenting (lots of love and being firm but able to bend rules sometimes) is the best kind. Also Dwairy, 2010, who says about inconsistency repeatedly being shown to be the worse type of parenting. I actually did a class this semester in the psychology of different life stages.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    My dad is a plumber and my mum is a receptionist. Neither really had much education and, like yours, they have always been pushy to do well. Sometimes crazy pushy (my mum would go through my maths homework when I was little and if I got one wrong she would make me do the whole thing again - it was pretty ridiculous ). But they have always been consistent; my siblings and I know what is expected and we do it.

    You might find Baumrind, 1971, interesting. She says that authoritative parenting (lots of love and being firm but able to bend rules sometimes) is the best kind. Also Dwairy, 2010, who says about inconsistency repeatedly being shown to be the worse type of parenting. I actually did a class this semester in the psychology of different life stages.
    What you say is true in the psychology references but to be honest there is evidence for pretty much any point of view on child development. It's disturbing when you think about it.

    I personally think it's all about being balanced which is a mix of both your references


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    I blame weak parenting and an over-reliance on modern technology.
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    What are your opinions that teenagers do not get a C or above in english or maths?

    We are mostly talking about native english speakers as well not being able to pass english above a level C.

    I find this odd because international students who come here for university often speak less english than native speakers and are classed as a higher level at speaking / writing english.

    Is this fair? and should Britain step up their game and make these 40% of teenagers pass their basic skills?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articl...hs-and-english
    I really hope you're being satirical.


    For maths, it's a problem. It's probably overblown a bit, but should be addressed.
    For English, it's only a problem because it's a requirement from educators and employers. Legislation to prevent such organisations from using it as a requirement would solve this, but I don't see the government doing anything about it.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    I really hope you're being satirical.


    For maths, it's a problem. It's probably overblown a bit, but should be addressed.
    For English, it's only a problem because it's a requirement from educators and employers. Legislation to prevent such organisations from using it as a requirement would solve this, but I don't see the government doing anything about it.
    You do know that capitalising most of my words makes no difference to the concept of the article. js.
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    That is a good point. But the most common factor for grades are schools and colleges. And students of course ;D
    While I believe that this is a nationwide problem, I don't believe its the fault of the students or a lot of the teachers. Although some teachers are at fault. I believe that this is because the education system is trying so hard to help the UK climb the international tables, they are making the exams ridiculously hard. They've made education too much about league tables and how we fair against other countries when we should really be looking at the students and what can be done to improve their education, not improve our worldwide education status.
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    You do know that capitalising most of my words makes no difference to the concept of the article. js.
    You're right: capitalising most of the words wouldn't change it much. On the other hand, correct use of capitalisation would make it seem like you have basic knowledge of English grammar, so can adequately take part in the discussion. If it was meant to be satire, it didn't come off well.
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    Attitude to learning and teacher training are the main issues.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    You're right: capitalising most of the words wouldn't change it much. On the other hand, correct use of capitalisation would make it seem like you have basic knowledge of English grammar, so can adequately take part in the discussion. If it was meant to be satire, it didn't come off well.
    So you're saying that if any one within this discussion doesn't have good 'English' grammar, that they shouldn't take part in it. That's absurd! This isn't a marked essay where you get marks for your grammar, yes you'll get more credibility, however I believe people could type as they please.
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    I think the fact that English taught in school is so horribly out of date with the modern world is what causes teenagers to lose interest and thus put little effort into trying to succeed; quite rightly why should the average 16 year old find Shakespeare interesting? There's no denying he's a proflic playright, but the fact that "modern" in English schools seems to be mid 1950s is an absolute joke.

    I also think it's a joke how society places so much importance upon these 2 arbitrary GCSE grades (inb4 raged at by maths students) when they literally will be ****ing useless to 99% of people afterwards. In the 4 years I've had my GCSE B in Maths & English Lit. I have not once had to use anything more complicated than basic divison/addition/subtraction/multiplication and as for English, everything I know about grammar and such is from learning a foreign language.

    These results are understandable and unfortunately our dull government have only made English even more boring last time I checked.
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    So you're saying that if any one within this discussion doesn't have good 'English' grammar, that they shouldn't take part in it. That's absurd! This isn't a marked essay where you get marks for your grammar, yes you'll get more credibility, however I believe people could type as they please.
    No. I'm just saying that you might not be able to understand it. I don't have a problem with you taking part if you feel that you're able to.
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    It cannot be the case that everyone passes, otherwise a pass is meaningless.

    We can't all be good at maths and English and we need a system to differentiate between the capabilities and achievements of people.

    This is why the education system are idiots, because they set all schools targets that entail getting everyone to the 'average level.'
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    No. I'm just saying that you might not be able to understand it. I don't have a problem with you taking part if you feel that you're able to.
    I'm sure everyone in this conversation isn't able to understand 'english' and 'English' (!)
 
 
 
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