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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Yes, you will. Mickey mouse will lead to a low-paying position which will lead to not enough money to live which will lead to stress.


    Did you even read the article? They don't get paid £40K permanently to teach, they get UP TO (and not OVER) £40K to enroll in a 2-year training programme. Once they finish the programme and look for a teaching job, they won't earn anywhere near £40K unless they take on a large number of senior managerial responsibilities (and even then, that salary will most likely only happen in London which has sky-high living costs). Most teachers don't have a PhD, btw. There was a push towards making them more uni-educated by giving them the chance to do a MA but now the push is towards letting schools hire unqualified teachers (obviously, this brings the salaries of certified teachers down due to the increased competition). I would bet you 10 pints that there are more certified engineers than teachers (secondary school level and below) with a PhD.
    (over £40K because govt pension plans are better than private - its all money)

    ....so you basically saying the difference is due to men continuing to get higher and higher qualifications while women do not?

    This is also changing - in the USA its already true that women get more Phds (and thus bigger pay packets)
    https://live.washingtonpost.com/phd-study.html

    In the UK - 46% percent of PhDs are taken by women - nearly the same as men.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    What job classifies as 'physics grad'?

    I really don't get how you guys are attaching £££s to degrees that don't lead to any discernable jobs and for which the jobs these grads go into are entirely subjective on whichever area tickles their fancy.

    Maths, Physics, NatSci, Biology etc don't lead to any specific jobs. However much these grads end up earning is a result of a randomised selection of careers they choose to pursue.

    Even engineering grads don't all go into engineering...

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    Its more related to what Masters you do if you do a degree that is not a masters degree.

    For example you could be doing a degree in Zoology because you like animals but you decide to do your masters in "Textiles" because the UK fashion industry is worth BILLIONS and you want to grab a share!!!

    Most zoologists are women.
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    Why are you comparing how much you earn atm living in UK compared to
    how much he is earning back in Romania?

    It would be a fairer comparison if you compare yourself to someone doing research in Physics AND living in UK.
    It was a joke, Christ :rofl:. If you read the latter part of my argument, I went on to the serious part.

    In Romania he won't get paid above 13k per annum anyway after graduation, because in my country there are so many students specialised in engineering, you find Polytechnic grads working as cashiers in supermarkets. Unless they choose to go abroad, they haven't got much to profess at home, and if they choose to work home, they'll have to be top of the class to even be considered in one of the few jobs still available for them.

    If I go back in Romania to work in the ministry of external affairs after graduation, I'll have a starting salary of 18k. Conversely, in the UK an engineer friend of mine will start at 25k at a low-tier company and can go up to 30k in his first years. If I get in the Civil Service stream here, I'd have a starting salary of 25k-27k. If I go to work for the EU it's 40k starting salary :sexface:. If he gets to a good company, I think he'll have around 33k-37k starting salary.

    With that being said, my degree is not really pointless yet in local and international affairs, and I doubt it will become any time sooner.
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    Its more related to what Masters you do if you do a degree that is not a masters degree.
    For example you could be doing a degree in Zoology because you like animals but you decide to do your masters in "Textiles" because the UK fashion industry is worth BILLIONS and you want to grab a share!!!
    A Masters degree still doesn't lead to a specific job..

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    A Masters degree still doesn't lead to a specific job..

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    Nope, but if your degree is not a masters already, you tend to pick the masters for the real career you're interested in. Hence so many for IT and that type of thing.

    If you have a masters in IT you will certainly get a job in IT - its a no brainer. Thats big bucks in your pocket , no sweat.

    You will probably need to get good marks in your Ordinary degree to get in though - its not a slam dunk!
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    tbh i find them the most coolest and the most i'd like to settle down with. Go for what you enjoy and love.

    Honestly i know more than enough people doing ***** careers for ££££ and so unhappy it's unreal.
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    Nope, but if your degree is not a masters already, you tend to pick the masters for the real career you're interested in. Hence so many for IT and that type of thing.

    If you have a masters in IT you will certainly get a job in IT - its a no brainer. Thats big bucks in your pocket , no sweat.

    You will probably need to get good marks in your Ordinary degree to get in though - its not a slam dunk!
    Not really.. If someone with a masters flunks the interview or can't show demonstration of the right skills needed to work in whichever role it is they're applying to, they won't get a job.

    A degree is just a tick box to get you into the process, it doesn't guarantee anything.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Not really.. If someone with a masters flunks the interview or can't show demonstration of the right skills needed to work in whichever role it is they're applying to, they won't get a job.

    A degree is just a tick box to get you into the process, it doesn't guarantee anything.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I find it difficult to believe that someone with a masters in IT can't get a job.
    So much IT is brand new, there is no one with 10 years experience in AngularJS or stuff like that.... Really, it should be no problem
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I find it difficult to believe that someone with a masters in IT can't get a job.
    So much IT is brand new, there is no one with 10 years experience in AngularJS or stuff like that.... Really, it should be no problem
    Masters in IT degrees don't teach you 'AngularJS' or any of the new fancy programming languages/frameworks.

    The students themselves have to get their hands dirty with code, come up with projects (from start to end) by themselves and of course they need to be able to communicate their ideas towards an interviewer. The fact of the matter is, if these Masters in IT students don't buck up to build up experience and skills outside of uni they won't stand a chance for a job.

    The same goes with any (non-healthcare) degree. You can't possibly fool yourself into thinking a degree by itself will be a ticket into a company because for the most part that company doesn't care; they want people who can get the job done.

    This is why all this generalised talk of grad prospects is a waste of time. Your prospects are as individualised as they come.

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    Because money isn't everything
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Yes, you will. Mickey mouse will lead to a low-paying position which will lead to not enough money to live which will lead to stress.
    Not that high level of stress though. It's not as stressful as an investment banker for example.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    Not that high level of stress though. It's not as stressful as an investment banker for example.
    IB is an exception. Think of it this way, children with poor parents have a very different neurodevelopment than those whose parents are not poor.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Masters in IT degrees don't teach you 'AngularJS' or any of the new fancy programming languages/frameworks.

    The students themselves have to get their hands dirty with code, come up with projects (from start to end) by themselves and of course they need to be able to communicate their ideas towards an interviewer. The fact of the matter is, if these Masters in IT students don't buck up to build up experience and skills outside of uni they won't stand a chance for a job.

    The same goes with any (non-healthcare) degree. You can't possibly fool yourself into thinking a degree by itself will be a ticket into a company because for the most part that company doesn't care; they want people who can get the job done.

    This is why all this generalised talk of grad prospects is a waste of time. Your prospects are as individualised as they come.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    come on.. You're not seriously saying you could not get a job in IT with this masters:

    http://www.masterstudies.co.uk/MSc-i...g-Data/UK/UoL/

    Look at jobserve, there are 12,000 jobs in IT each week
    http://www.jobserve.com/gb/en/JobSea...FA379207205A20
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    (Original post by karl pilkington)
    a lot of women aren't cut out for scientific or really academic degrees
    A lot of men aren't cut out for scientific or really academic degrees
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    Marrying a rich man is always the second option but (most) males don't really have this option.


    I personally don't go by this but many females do.
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    (Original post by Erebor)
    http://content.time.com/time/special...073703,00.html



    I rarely hear girls say they chose a degree/career because of money, they all talk about their ''passion'' for it, like school has nothing to do with their future earnings. Many do it knowing full well that they won't even use that degree since they'll end working part-time or stay at home (even for Ivy league only 1/3 of female graduates work full time). I guess they don't need to worry about paying back their huge student loans since they'll never be earning the minimum required anyway. This is rarely the case with men, money plays a much bigger role. This is also why fewer and fewer men are going to university and doing well paid apprenticeships instead of some degree where the biggest challenge is not throwing up during the uni parties (women also choose the lowest paid apprenticeships, btw).
    You'd do well to realise that girls are the dominant sex in educational achievement, this is not limited to degrees you consider pointless or obsolete.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    IB is an exception. Think of it this way, children with poor parents have a very different neurodevelopment than those whose parents are not poor.
    Hmm true but you can still be financially stable (not poor) and have a lower paid job e.g. earning £30,000 a year depending on other factors. It's hard to judge as there are positives and negatives to both sides. I feel as if we've complicated our lives though.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    Hmm true but you can still be financially stable (not poor) and have a lower paid job e.g. earning £30,000 a year depending on other factors. It's hard to judge as there are positives and negatives to both sides. I feel as if we've complicated our lives though.
    A 30K job is not a low-paying job.
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    It's the choices they make before and after choosing a degree
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    (over £40K because govt pension plans are better than private - its all money)

    ....so you basically saying the difference is due to men continuing to get higher and higher qualifications while women do not?

    This is also changing - in the USA its already true that women get more Phds (and thus bigger pay packets)
    https://live.washingtonpost.com/phd-study.html

    In the UK - 46% percent of PhDs are taken by women - nearly the same as men.
    Look at the subjects, a PhD in STEM is worth more (financially) than a PhD in Education/History/etc. So women getting more PhDs is irrelevant if the vast majority of the PhD subjects are not STEM.
 
 
 
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