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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Actually, a lot of immigrants of Indian origin that came in the 70s and 80s came from East Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania) and were NOT educated professionals on the whole. It was their children's generation (our parents' generation that started to become educated professionals) which has continued to our generation.

    Even in the 60s, most of those Indian immigrants that came from India were not educated professionals.

    The educated professionals coming over to the UK is a recent thing - 90s onwards.



    Subhas Chandra Bose, right?

    :adore:
    Indian immigrants come from India. Ugandans, Kenyans and Tanzanians are not Indians. Indian immigration is far more recent, like you have said.
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    Because we are smart and have a strong work ethic therefore we are successful unlike Pakistanis.
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    (Original post by ZolaCFC25)
    Indian immigrants come from India. Ugandans, Kenyans and Tanzanians are not Indians. Indian immigration is far more recent, like you have said.
    Not all people of Indian origin/ethnicity in the UK came straight from India. They could have lived in another country before coming to the UK.

    The immigrants and their descendants that came via Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania in 1970s/1980s are of Indian origin and so they are regarded as Indian migrants and as part of the British Indian community.
    During censuses and questionnaires, they tick their ethnicity as Asian Indian or British Indian.
    The vast majority of these people arrived as refugees and were unskilled and uneducated and yet this is one of THE most successful groups of immigrants in the UK.

    But there was also a first wave of uneducated, unskilled Indians who came from India back in the 1950s and 1960s.

    The statistics that are presented about the Indian community in the UK includes these groups too.

    What you were talking about is like a third wave of Indian origin people migrating to the UK.



    spv help me explain.
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Not all people of Indian origin/ethnicity in the UK came straight from India. They could have lived in another country before coming to the UK.

    The immigrants and their descendants that came via Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania in 1970s/1980s are of Indian origin and so they are regarded as Indian migrants and as part of the British Indian community.
    During censuses and questionnaires, they tick their ethnicity as Asian Indian or British Indian.
    The vast majority of these people arrived as refugees and were unskilled and uneducated and yet this is one of THE most successful groups of immigrants in the UK.

    But there was also a first wave of uneducated, unskilled Indians who came from India back in the 1950s and 1960s.

    The statistics that are presented about the Indian community in the UK includes these groups too.

    What you were talking about is like a third wave of Indian origin people migrating to the UK.



    spv help me explain.
    craaaaaaaaaaap
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    craaaaaaaaaaap
    What is? :confused:
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Not all people of Indian origin/ethnicity in the UK came straight from India. They could have lived in another country before coming to the UK.

    The immigrants and their descendants that came via Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania in 1970s/1980s are of Indian origin and so they are regarded as Indian migrants and as part of the British Indian community.
    During censuses and questionnaires, they tick their ethnicity as Asian Indian or British Indian.
    The vast majority of these people arrived as refugees and were unskilled and uneducated and yet this is one of THE most successful groups of immigrants in the UK.

    But there was also a first wave of uneducated, unskilled Indians who came from India back in the 1950s and 1960s.

    The statistics that are presented about the Indian community in the UK includes these groups too.

    What you were talking about is like a third wave of Indian origin people migrating to the UK.



    spv help me explain.
    the only reason those uneducated indians and their kids have become very successful now is because the time the parents came, they were discriminated against and worked very hard to make a living and integrated. Cant say that about the other two communities unfortunately. The 2nd and 3rd generation have become more segregated and radicalised compared to their parents because they have been let lose in this country with a political correctness agenda unlike the 70s it was 'put up or shut up'
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    (Original post by sachinisgod)
    the only reason those uneducated indians and their kids have become very successful now is because the time the parents came, they were discriminated against and worked very hard to make a living and integrated. Cant say that about the other two communities unfortunately. The 2nd and 3rd generation have become more segregated and radicalised compared to their parents because they have been let lose in this country with a political correctness agenda unlike the 70s it was 'put up or shut up'
    Are you talking about Pakistanis, Bangladeshis and the 2nd/3rd generation of those immigrants communities?
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Are you talking about Pakistanis, Bangladeshis and the 2nd/3rd generation of those immigrants communities?
    indeed I am. Calling spade a spade
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    (Original post by slade p)
    Because we are smart and have a strong work ethic therefore we are successful unlike Pakistanis.
    Nowadays, most of the prominent Asians in politics, journalism, sport, music etc tend to be Pakistanis and Bangladeshis rather than Indians, even though there's more Indians in the UK and they're from more privileged backgrounds and face much less discrimination.
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    (Original post by ESPORTIVA LUTA)
    I would say the true reason, but i'll be banned
    I'm intrigued to hear your response tbh. It wouldn't be removed unless it was racist and/or offensive?
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Not all people of Indian origin/ethnicity in the UK came straight from India. They could have lived in another country before coming to the UK.

    The immigrants and their descendants that came via Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania in 1970s/1980s are of Indian origin and so they are regarded as Indian migrants and as part of the British Indian community.
    During censuses and questionnaires, they tick their ethnicity as Asian Indian or British Indian.
    The vast majority of these people arrived as refugees and were unskilled and uneducated and yet this is one of THE most successful groups of immigrants in the UK.

    But there was also a first wave of uneducated, unskilled Indians who came from India back in the 1950s and 1960s.

    The statistics that are presented about the Indian community in the UK includes these groups too.

    What you were talking about is like a third wave of Indian origin people migrating to the UK.



    spv help me explain.
    Most of the Indians that came from East Africa were businessman, some were even professionals like bankers, accountants, teachers, etc, they were fluent in English and were educated at least to a basic level. These factors gave them a huge advantage over the communities which came directly from the subcontinent who were mostly uneducated and from rural famring backgrounds.
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    (Original post by Aztec123)
    Most of the Indians that came from East Africa were businessman, some were even professionals like bankers, accountants, teachers, etc, they were fluent in English and were educated at least to a basic level. These factors gave them a huge advantage over the communities which came directly from the subcontinent who were mostly uneducated and from rural famring backgrounds.
    nucdev

    http://www.economist.com/news/christ...ed/goingglobal
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    karma sutra that is why ;P
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    (Original post by Daimonos)
    lolyh that's because your family would honour kill you if you were to even dream of pursuing a career that wasnt in medicine or engineering
    More likely it's cause they're the 2nd most populous country
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    (Original post by HanSoloLuck)
    It's not representative of the Indian demographic as you seem to imply, that is to say, it isn't race or ethnicity at work here.

    The Indian demographics that live in the UK largely came over at the end of the British colonization of India, the ones that came over were in all well to do middle class, with the money to travel and the intelligence to realize that without us racist white people running their country for them it would go down the [email protected]

    If you were to take actual lower/working class Indians you would see a stark difference in the stats, many of them still live tribal existences.

    There was specific warnings given by the Indians that came over, when the government was about to open our borders to rural Pakistan and India, that these people were very different, I could hunt out the quote if you like. It was in a talk given by Christopher Hittchens on the Muslim issue in his area.
    Please do post the quote or talk by Christopher Hitchens! His ideas were brilliant and remain unrivalled, Im a big fan of the guy.
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    (Original post by Lord Samosa)
    Pakistani's in countries like America are quite well off. But in the UK we've had more idk how to say it, "trashy" type of Pakistani's immigrate here :lol:
    Nah, the situation is very similar in Canada. I'm Canadian..but we have FAR MORE Indians in Canada then Pakistanis. I find in the Uk it's the reverse
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    (Original post by simmys)
    Nah, the situation is very similar in Canada. I'm Canadian..but we have FAR MORE Indians in Canada then Pakistanis. I find in the Uk it's the reverse
    Indians in Canada seem to be a bit messed up..
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo...rganized_crime
    'Awesome' people indeed.
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    (Original post by Aztec123)
    Indians in Canada seem to be a bit messed up..
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo...rganized_crime
    'Awesome' people indeed.
    Indian Canadian gang crime in BC is largely ORGANIZED crime and not rape groups who target little girls. They usually have violence within their own race group and it is segregated to just British Columbia. This issue is not as huge as it once was in the 90s, but you do still see violence related to large organized crime groups. Particularly drug trafficing but this is seen quite a bit in BC in a large aray of racial groups. Again this has changed largely since the 90s.

    Also, you may want to look at the majority of Indians in Canadian politics to see the huge impact they have made in the country for the very short period of time they have been living here.
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    (Original post by Aztec123)
    Indians in Canada seem to be a bit messed up..
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo...rganized_crime
    'Awesome' people indeed.
    Indo-Canadians are significantly more likely than the Canadian average to have a university degree, and most Indians in Canada are socio-economically middle class.[2] 54% of South Asians in Canada have household incomes greater than $60,000, compared to the 46% Canadian average. Canadian adults of East Indian origin are much less likely than other adults to live alone. In 2001, just 4% of the East Indian community aged 15 and over lived alone, compared with 13% of all adult Canadians. Seniors of East Indian origin are especially unlikely to live alone. That year, only 8% of Canadians of East Indian origin aged 65 and over lived alone, compared with 29% of all seniors in Canada. In contrast, seniors of East Indian origin are more likely than other seniors to live with members of their extended family. In 2001, 24% of seniors of East Indian origin lived with relatives, such as the family of a son or daughter, while only 5% of all seniors in Canada lived with relatives

    Straight from statistics Canada. Also bare in mind mass Indian immigration to Canada didn't start until the 80s. Majority of young Indian-Canadians are first generation
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    (Original post by nucdev)
    Or East African Gujju style - the fried mogo chips are ready :lol:
    **** you kenyan too?
 
 
 
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