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OCR Latin GCSE Official Thread 2016 Watch

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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    That is a lot! I'm doing Pliny [avunculus meus et tres feminae] and Nisus and Euryalus [Aeneid IX].

    I'm mainly focusing on, really, knowing the passages inside out; for me, there are parts that I can get just by thinking- ''nihil enim legit quod non excerperet''= For there was nothing from which he did not take extracts [Pliny- A Day In The Life], and some areas where I know where they're from but I won't know how to translate it.

    Then the lit crit [Never used that phrase- 'tis fantasticus!] comes as a by product.
    Being the only student means my teacher has literally given me the handbook- note use of the adverb 'literally' - from which I can learn the notes, and it's pretty easy. Then I can assign different bits to different aspects, making it fairly easy for me to say: "
    'Ooh, I know that chiasmus is used in this bit- timorem eius sua securitate- as a way of denoting that Pliny the Elder's actions and emotions are going against the social norms, fully outlining how he is keeping his duty as commander of the fleet- Misenum, at which he is stationed- whilst also maintaining his selflessness despite putting himself in danger, shown by even more chiasmus- festinat illuc unde alii fugiunt."

    You get the idea.
    I'm doing those set texts too! Have you got any ideas for 8 mark questions for Pliny? I want to have a go at a few before tuesday
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    (Original post by Crème brûlée)
    I'm doing those set texts too! Have you got any ideas for 8 mark questions for Pliny? I want to have a go at a few before tuesday
    Yeah- these are some that my teacher has used, as well as some I've made up to put myself into the situation.

    What does Pliny teach us about Roman values in his letters?

    Just as a side:
    You may wish to consider:
    The characters' positions in society
    The themes shown in both texts

    How is Pliny the Elder portrayed in 'A Day In The Life' and is this also shown in 'The Death of Pliny The Elder'?*

    In what ways can Pliny The Elder and Arria be described as foolish individuals?

    How do the stories of Pliny The Elder and Arria link to today, in terms of society and personalities?*

    Do you think Pliny The Younger is biased in any way towards Pliny the Elder?


    That should keep you going until Tuesday

    Tell me how you do!

    (* denotes ones I made up myself...)
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    (Original post by 123Master321)
    for the purpose of is another way of translating the gerundive of purpose
    yeah, relicti erant was had been left behind
    Ok thanks
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    (Original post by BluWacky)
    "astrologorum" is genitive plural - so there were definitely more than one.



    The word was "confecta". It depends how you translated it. Did you put "having sustained very many wounds"? If so then I suppose there's a chance it could be a minor error, although it doesn't really get the sense that she was, literally, finished off by them...

    As for "bearing a sword" it's an understandable mistake - after all, tollo's principal parts include sustuli and sublatum, simialr to fero's - but I don't know how strict the examiners will be. Will they even allow "drawing his sword", or is that too far away from the Latin? Guess we'll have to find out in due course.
    I put astrologer singular (stupid silly mistake) is that minor or major?
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    (Original post by 14Abbott)
    I put astrologer singular (stupid silly mistake) is that minor or major?
    That's a difficult one. I'd say minor.

    Purely because of the fact that:

    a) It doesn't change the meaning of the sentence, and the sentence in itself is quite anecdotal.
    b) It depends on only one letter.


    However...

    The genitive plural is quite an easily identified case ending, with the -o/arum, and the examiners won't know that it was a silly mistake.

    I nearly put astrologer without the 's' too, so I'm sure it was done very commonly across the whole country. Either way you need not worry, as I think everyone is expecting lower grade boundaries than usual.
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    For Paper 2 instead of "they easily crushed the slaves" could you put "they easily defeated the slaves"


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    It's far too soon to tell with things like vocab etc. what the examiners will agree at standardisation. It's possible that some of the alternative renderings of vocab will be accepted, or minor errors, or major errors - but until that point we can't really say.

    It's worth noting that the standard guidance in the mark schemes state:

    Any omitted word is a major error. Unlessthere is a special ruling any error oftense, case or person etc. is a majorerror.
    So until we know any further, "astrologer" instead of "astrologers" will be a major error.
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    Yeah- these are some that my teacher has used, as well as some I've made up to put myself into the situation.

    What does Pliny teach us about Roman values in his letters?

    Just as a side:
    You may wish to consider:
    The characters' positions in society
    The themes shown in both texts

    How is Pliny the Elder portrayed in 'A Day In The Life' and is this also shown in 'The Death of Pliny The Elder'?*

    In what ways can Pliny The Elder and Arria be described as foolish individuals?

    How do the stories of Pliny The Elder and Arria link to today, in terms of society and personalities?*

    Do you think Pliny The Younger is biased in any way towards Pliny the Elder?


    That should keep you going until Tuesday

    Tell me how you do!

    (* denotes ones I made up myself...)
    Great questions

    I've only got one, but you've probably seen it as it was in the 2015 paper:

    How does Pliny the younger maintain the reader's interest in his letters? (Day in the life, death and Arria)
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    Hi mate, I am doing exactly the same literature as you. You said about the handbook, is there any chance you can message me, got a few questions for you pal
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    (Original post by sunny181113)
    If it was "were easily crushed" it would require a passive - but it was an imperfect subjunctive so:
    They entered the home so fast that they easily crushed a few slaves, who had been left behind to look after the mistress
    yup it was in the active.. one could tell since it said "paucos servos"
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    (Original post by Crème brûlée)
    Great questions

    I've only got one, but you've probably seen it as it was in the 2015 paper:

    How does Pliny the younger maintain the reader's interest in his letters? (Day in the life, death and Arria)
    Funny you mention that- my teacher [or rather, my private tutor ] gave me the test as a practice. I'm thinking I need to be WAY more direct with my answers!

    I'm hoping it is more related to the characters this year, because I find that question quite difficult to answer.
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    Funny you mention that- my teacher [or rather, my private tutor ] gave me the test as a practice. I'm thinking I need to be WAY more direct with my answers!

    I'm hoping it is more related to the characters this year, because I find that question quite difficult to answer.
    Same! I prefer the questions when they're more direct if you get me! And I need to agree with the question...I found Pliny a bit boring so I was really stumped on this question!!!
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    (Original post by fuzz13)
    Same! I prefer the questions when they're more direct if you get me! And I need to agree with the question...I found Pliny a bit boring so I was really stumped on this question!!!
    See, I find Pliny quite interesting, but that was only because Pliny the Elder was a scholarly person, and I like education too- NOT because of how it was written or how he himself portrayed the characters. Just the stories.

    I personally find Nisus and Euryalus slightly boring. There's too much war. I'd rather learn about temples and Roman values, not about how the helmet of Euryalus betrayed him...
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    Does anyone have any good practice questions for Nisus and Euryalus
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    (Original post by AimingHighA*)
    Does anyone have any good practice questions for Nisus and Euryalus
    Possible 8 mark questions:-
    1. What details in Virgil's tale of N and E strike you as tragic?
    2.How does Virgil create suspense in the tale of N and E?
    3.What makes Virgil's account of N and E story dramatic?
    4.How does Virgil portray the characters of both N and E?
    5. How does Virgil sustain our interest in the story of N and E?
    6.What do you think are the key themes in Virgil's story of N and E?
    7.What are the similarities and differences between the characters of N and E?
    8.How sympathetically does Virgil treat N and E?
    9. How does Virgil engage the audience in the story of N and E?
    10. In your opinion, do N and E deserve their fate?
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    It all made sense, but it was difficult in a few respects. There were a fair few words which I had personally never seen before- 'inrupit', which apparently means 'he violated/he broke in'.

    Also, did anyone definitely get what the clause with 'tum ventrem suum Anceto offerens exclamavit', or whatever it was, means?

    I couldn't work out where the offerens came in, due to the fact Anceto was not in the nominative, yet he was the one that had caused Agrippina to die...
    Apparently it means, offering her stomach, she exclaimed ' wound me here'

    unfortunately thats far from what i put although it does make much more sense.
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    tips on revising latin lit? for caesar tacitus and cicero and nisus+euryalus
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    I personally find Nisus and Euryalus slightly boring. There's too much war. I'd rather learn about temples and Roman values, not about how the helmet of Euryalus betrayed him...
    Nisus and Euryalus is in many ways about Roman values, though!

    It's a reconfiguration of a similar story from the Iliad, where Greek soldiers attack an enemy camp at night and slaughter Trojans for glory; here, however, the rashness and gung-ho heroism that marks Greek heroes out for glory is instead a sign of foolishness and imprudence. Nisus and Euryalus should keep a handle on their emotions, but they are carried away by "too much slaughter" - the excess is totally anti-Roman. Also note how Volcens is defined by his rage and anger - the driving forces of the Iliad are turned into negatives across the board.

    Also worth noting that early section where Nisus asks about free will - "do the gods put this passion in our minds" etc. This is a standard question about Stoic/Epicurean philosophy, something so key to the Aeneid contextually.

    Also... how is war portrayed in the section, do you think? Bearing in mind that Virgil was writing this in the aftermath of two bloody civil wars (Triumvirate vs Conspirators and Octavian v Antony), where countless Roman families had been torn apart by death, all in the name of bringing about the era of "pax Romana" that Augustus ceaselessly presented in propaganda?

    You can never divorce a text entirely from its context...
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    Possible 8 mark questions:-
    1. What details in Virgil's tale of N and E strike you as tragic?
    2.How does Virgil create suspense in the tale of N and E?
    3.What makes Virgil's account of N and E story dramatic?
    4.How does Virgil portray the characters of both N and E?
    5. How does Virgil sustain our interest in the story of N and E?
    6.What do you think are the key themes in Virgil's story of N and E?
    7.What are the similarities and differences between the characters of N and E?
    8.How sympathetically does Virgil treat N and E?
    9. How does Virgil engage the audience in the story of N and E?
    10. In your opinion, do N and E deserve their fate?

    THank you- these are awesome!
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    (Original post by exams2)
    tips on revising latin lit? for caesar tacitus and cicero and nisus+euryalus
    Hey I'm doing the exact same combo as you!!! I actually enjoy Nisus and Euryalus as well as caesur and Cicero so it's way easier learning them. But I just don't like Tacitus I find him a bit boring.
    I learnt Tacitus by dividing Boudiccas speech into five sections and learning that word for word (writing it out and saying it aloud) plus the grammar points and style for each mini bit. After I'm confident I move on to the next one and have some popcorn to congratulate myself . Then I will repeat this for the Suetonius bit then the actual battle bit. I took me an hour to properly learn Boudiccas speech so I'm guessing roughly the same for the other two

    Hope this helps and good luck!!
 
 
 
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