A2 Government and Politics AQA predictions 3a/4a?

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Four things that unis think matter more than league tables 08-12-2016
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    (Original post by aash-na)
    thank god i chose to do constitution and SCOTUS, exec and congress looked so hard! anyone else do the same topics? how did you find it
    Yup, thought the constitution question was great, i just think the 30 marker for legislature was a bit hard couldn't find a lot of things to talk about.
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    (Original post by basic1996*****)
    Oh dear, I didn't mention any of that.. Hopefully everyone failed so my grade will average out
    That's my current feeling

    (Original post by Leth4lTurnip)
    Some amazingly good guesses there
    It's a shame I ignored them all seeing as though they're usually wrong
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    I did legislature and executive.

    For advice and consent I talked about the importance of both ratifying treaties and federal appointments.

    For parties in congress on one side I said about increased in polarisation, and redistricting and permanent campaign means parties are more important in the House. On the other side I talked about the decentralised nature of the parties and a lack of carrots and stick, and internal coalitions, and the advice and consent powers (ratifying treaties especially) combined with longer terms means parties are less important in the Senate.

    For spoils system I talked about how it leads to a loyalty-competency payoff, giving the example of Michael Brown nominated by Bush before Katrina, and how it is constitutionally viable as laws must be "faithfully executed", and a president has more faith in a loyal friend.

    For vulnerability vs. strength, I talked about polarisation in Congress, gridlock and need for the power of persuasion, but on the other side I talked about how the president is strong in foreign policy and in times of crisis, especially Bush after 9/11 and how he was allowed to increase the size and strength of the fed bureau. with Homeland Security(imperial presidency), and how Nixon was strong in the domestic arena and how he used the federal bureaucracy against his enemies.

    I thought it was a lovely paper. Is there anything I have got wrong or could have added?
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    (Original post by Leth4lTurnip)
    I did legislature and executive.

    For advice and consent I talked about the importance of both ratifying treaties and federal appointments.

    For parties in congress on one side I said about increased in polarisation, and redistricting and permanent campaign means parties are more important in the House. On the other side I talked about the decentralised nature of the parties and a lack of carrots and stick, and internal coalitions, and the advice and consent powers (ratifying treaties especially) combined with longer terms means parties are less important in the Senate.

    For spoils system I talked about how it leads to a loyalty-competency payoff, giving the example of Michael Brown nominated by Bush before Katrina, and how it is constitutionally viable as laws must be "faithfully executed", and a president has more faith in a loyal friend.

    For vulnerability vs. strength, I talked about polarisation in Congress, gridlock and need for the power of persuasion, but on the other side I talked about how the president is strong in foreign policy and in times of crisis, especially Bush after 9/11 and how he was allowed to increase the size and strength of the fed bureau. with Homeland Security(imperial presidency), and how Nixon was strong in the domestic arena and how he used the federal bureaucracy against his enemies.

    I thought it was a lovely paper. Is there anything I have got wrong or could have added?
    That question was cancerous. I only spoke about appointments, forgot all about ratifying treaties....
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    THAT PAPER WAS A GODSEND OH MY GOD
    Maybe it will bring my 3B up
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    (Original post by basic1996*****)
    I did the Supreme Court! The questions weren't too bad for this topic. For the 10 mark 'explain the process of selecting judges and their significance' I spent too long on the explanation and not enough on the significance! But the 30 marker was great! How about you?
    i get what you mean! i wrote so much for the 10 marker and i kinda had a feeling that protecting rights would come up but couldn't remember all the points! so i feel like my answer for that was shorter but still very happy with the questions don't worry too much about the significance bit, and I'm sure that whatever you feel you lost marks on you would have made up with on the 30 marker!
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    Evaluate the role of the Supreme Court in protecting the rights and liberties of UScitizens. (30 marks)

    The Supreme Court’s powers of judicial review enable it to declare the action of either a federalor state official unconstitutional. Furthermore, it can declare acts of Congress unconstitutional.For those proponents of limited government, the Supreme Court protects the citizen from thestate.

    The Bill of Rights contains the essential rights that US citizens enjoy. Later amendments (suchas 14 and 15) extend these rights further. Candidates will be able to cite a number of caseswhich might illustrate the way in which the Supreme Court has upheld these rights.The following are indicative examples; others could be used. It could be argued that theSupreme Court is effective in protecting these rights. The freedom of expression as outlined inthe First Amendment was protected by the Supreme Court in 1989 in the Texas vs Johnsoncase, which determined that the prohibitions on desecrating the US flag, which were in place inall but two of the US states, were contrary to the freedom of expression. The decision of theSupreme Court to uphold the due process clause of the US Constitution in the Roe vs Wade ruling of 1973, effectively barred state legislators such as Texas from preventing women fromhaving abortions. Pro-life groups argue that the rights of the unborn child are not protected as aresult of the Supreme Court’s decision in this case. In the case of District of Columbia vs Hellerin 2008, the Supreme Court upheld the right of US citizens to own guns in a landmark ruling,interpreting the Second Amendment of the US Constitution.

    In order to achieve high marks, candidates should be able to evaluate the chosen case(s).They should explain why the Supreme Court does not protect the civil rights and liberties of UScitizens. Arguments might include the following: Supreme Court decisions might be seen touphold one right but not another. The case of Citizens United vs Federal Election Commissionupholds the right of commercial organisations to pay for political advertising, as freedom ofexpression (Amendment 1). It might be argued that such advertising could adversely affectpolitical parties that have fewer or no connections with big business and that essentially this willbe a default help to the Republican Party. It could be argued that freedom of speech dependson the depth of one’s pockets.

    Some amendments to the US Constitution which sought to protect the rights of citizens werenever properly upheld by the Supreme Court. The 15th Amendment on ensuring all races hadthe vote was effectively violated by many (mainly) southern states, which introduced their ownrestrictions (such as literacy) on voter eligibility. Voter registration procedures came underscrutiny in Florida in 2000, when African American activists claimed that many black citizensfound it difficult to register to vote.

    The decision of the Court in the Bush vs Gore case in 2000 outraged many citizens becausethey believed that the Court had effectively denied the rights of Americans to a fair electionresult because of a narrow interpretation of whether a re-count of votes in the state of Floridashould be allowed to proceed.

    Finally, the Court cannot contradict the Constitution and its amendments, no matter howperverse they may be. The 18th Amendment, prohibiting the sale and consumption of alcohol,would be seen in most western, liberal societies as an affront to individual civil liberties. In theUnited States it was not seen as such because it was, for a time, part of the Constitution.
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    Examine the process for selecting Supreme Court judges in the USA (10)

    The process of selecting Supreme Court judges in the USA is strenuous. The first step involves the President nominating someone to become Supreme Court justice. Subsequently, background checks on the personal life and history of the candidate ensue to make sure certain requirements are met, such as no criminal record. These are carried out the FBI. Thirdly, the candidate appears before the Senate Judiciary Commitee when the subject is asked questions about their desire to become justice. This gives an opportunity for the candidate to express views they possess. For example, Roberts stated in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee that “judges are like umpires, they don’t make the law, they apply it”. After this, the Senate votes on whether to confirm the nominee by a simple majority. The process is of extreme importance because judges serve life tenures, meaning they will be on the court bench for sometime. Furthermore, it is seen by the President as a mechanism to continue his legacy because justices often outlive their President appointee. For example, Rehnquist outlived appointee Nixon. Additionally, the selection of a justice can upset the balance of political beliefs. If a conservative replaces a liberal, conservative interpretations and rulings will likely follow. The most recent selection of a Supreme Court judge was in 2009 with Sonia Sotomayor being nominated by Obama. Republicans criticised the decision by citing that she was an “activist”. Mitch McConnell was quoted “a judge must be able to check his or her political or personal agenda at the courtroom door. She did not do that”. The process of selecting Supreme Court judges is both strenuous and important because it represents the President’s legacy and judges serve life tenures. While most nominees are usually confirmed, there are examples of the contray. In 1987, Robert Bork was rejected by the Senate for being seen as a conservative replacing a liberal. In 2005, Harriet Miers asked for George Bush to withdraw her nomination after she performed poorly infront of the Senate Judiciary Committee and was criticised for never serving as a judge and having close personal ties with George Bush. To summarise, most nominees are confirmed in the strenuous process. It is important because it represents the President’s legacy, can upset the balances of political interpretation and judges serve life tenures.
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    just found those sample answers online for the SC section
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    (Original post by basic1996*****)
    Evaluate the role of the Supreme Court in protecting the rights and liberties of UScitizens. (30 marks)

    The Supreme Court’s powers of judicial review enable it to declare the action of either a federalor state official unconstitutional. Furthermore, it can declare acts of Congress unconstitutional.For those proponents of limited government, the Supreme Court protects the citizen from thestate.

    The Bill of Rights contains the essential rights that US citizens enjoy. Later amendments (suchas 14 and 15) extend these rights further. Candidates will be able to cite a number of caseswhich might illustrate the way in which the Supreme Court has upheld these rights.The following are indicative examples; others could be used. It could be argued that theSupreme Court is effective in protecting these rights. The freedom of expression as outlined inthe First Amendment was protected by the Supreme Court in 1989 in the Texas vs Johnsoncase, which determined that the prohibitions on desecrating the US flag, which were in place inall but two of the US states, were contrary to the freedom of expression. The decision of theSupreme Court to uphold the due process clause of the US Constitution in the Roe vs Wade ruling of 1973, effectively barred state legislators such as Texas from preventing women fromhaving abortions. Pro-life groups argue that the rights of the unborn child are not protected as aresult of the Supreme Court’s decision in this case. In the case of District of Columbia vs Hellerin 2008, the Supreme Court upheld the right of US citizens to own guns in a landmark ruling,interpreting the Second Amendment of the US Constitution.

    In order to achieve high marks, candidates should be able to evaluate the chosen case(s).They should explain why the Supreme Court does not protect the civil rights and liberties of UScitizens. Arguments might include the following: Supreme Court decisions might be seen touphold one right but not another. The case of Citizens United vs Federal Election Commissionupholds the right of commercial organisations to pay for political advertising, as freedom ofexpression (Amendment 1). It might be argued that such advertising could adversely affectpolitical parties that have fewer or no connections with big business and that essentially this willbe a default help to the Republican Party. It could be argued that freedom of speech dependson the depth of one’s pockets.

    Some amendments to the US Constitution which sought to protect the rights of citizens werenever properly upheld by the Supreme Court. The 15th Amendment on ensuring all races hadthe vote was effectively violated by many (mainly) southern states, which introduced their ownrestrictions (such as literacy) on voter eligibility. Voter registration procedures came underscrutiny in Florida in 2000, when African American activists claimed that many black citizensfound it difficult to register to vote.

    The decision of the Court in the Bush vs Gore case in 2000 outraged many citizens becausethey believed that the Court had effectively denied the rights of Americans to a fair electionresult because of a narrow interpretation of whether a re-count of votes in the state of Floridashould be allowed to proceed.

    Finally, the Court cannot contradict the Constitution and its amendments, no matter howperverse they may be. The 18th Amendment, prohibiting the sale and consumption of alcohol,would be seen in most western, liberal societies as an affront to individual civil liberties. In theUnited States it was not seen as such because it was, for a time, part of the Constitution.
    I hope you guys didnt answer the SC essay like this. The question was worded very carefully. If you answered the question like this you're getting level 3 at most.
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    The spoils question ****ed me up. Topic 2 and topic 3 30 marker wasn't too hard. Hopefully they salvage my mark.
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    (Original post by BirdIsWord)
    I hope you guys didnt answer the SC essay like this. The question was worded very carefully. If you answered the question like this you're getting level 3 at most.
    What was the exact wording? This was the only mark scheme I found online
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    (Original post by basic1996*****)
    What was the exact wording? This was the only mark scheme I found online
    The main role of the US Supreme Court is to protect civil rights and liberties of US citizens.

    or something similar
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    (Original post by Leth4lTurnip)
    I did legislature and executive.

    For advice and consent I talked about the importance of both ratifying treaties and federal appointments.

    For parties in congress on one side I said about increased in polarisation, and redistricting and permanent campaign means parties are more important in the House. On the other side I talked about the decentralised nature of the parties and a lack of carrots and stick, and internal coalitions, and the advice and consent powers (ratifying treaties especially) combined with longer terms means parties are less important in the Senate.

    For spoils system I talked about how it leads to a loyalty-competency payoff, giving the example of Michael Brown nominated by Bush before Katrina, and how it is constitutionally viable as laws must be "faithfully executed", and a president has more faith in a loyal friend.

    For vulnerability vs. strength, I talked about polarisation in Congress, gridlock and need for the power of persuasion, but on the other side I talked about how the president is strong in foreign policy and in times of crisis, especially Bush after 9/11 and how he was allowed to increase the size and strength of the fed bureau. with Homeland Security(imperial presidency), and how Nixon was strong in the domestic arena and how he used the federal bureaucracy against his enemies.

    I thought it was a lovely paper. Is there anything I have got wrong or could have added?

    Sounds like you smashed it welldone
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    (Original post by Shsjsk)
    Sounds like you smashed it welldone
    Cheers mate. This gives me confidence as I didn't like 3A on Tuesday
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    (Original post by Roofswinger)
    Executive: Spoils system (10) and presidential power (30)
    SC: Original Intent (10) and role in protecting rights (30)
    Constitution: Federalism/ decentralisation/ states rights (10), and IDK the 30 marker, any suggestions?
    Legislature LEaders of the House (10) and maybe role of parties in congress???
    This essay went so well for me! Most of my predictions came up, apart from the original intent and senate advise and consent. I'm so glad I spent time learning about the spoils system
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    please can someone tell me the 30 mark question for
    Electoral Process and Direct Democracy in 2016
 
 
 
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