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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Because far too many people in here believe that the higher salary job, the greater general life happiness.
    Amen to this, my stepdad earns a good wage (poverty to those who will clearly earn 100k in their early twenties types ofc) but he's always pretty down about things despite 3 career changes. Same **** different place, last minute plans have to be cancelled because you suddenly have to drive across the country to close a deal tomorrow, you end up having to do days of 12hr shifts to get work done etc. He's always getting digestive issues and such like which have been related to stress. It's screws your work life balance.

    Smidgen under 20k (though in the next few years with career progression that'll go up a bit as I'm low down on the ladder atm, but not massively realistically unless I opt to get into upper management). But we're fine at the moment, I do 7 hr days, 20 min break, it's not back breaking work, it's pretty stress free, time for chat and banter. Set off at 7:40, back before 4 (bit of flexi-time here on start and finish), don't need to think about work when at home, you don't get deadlines which need to be met, reasonably casual management, can ask for half days at the drop of the hat (tomorrow England v Wales ofc) and just make up the time whenever.

    Now yeah I'll wanting the salary to go up with age and a family, but I'd much rather earn £30k or so and have a really good work/life balance than earn double or triple but have a load on my shoulders. Bit different if you're in London, this is for the midlands.

    Obviously everyone is different, some like the challenge, some aim to earn/save a lot when young and retire significantly earlier. Some particular skillsets will allow for a high wage without too much stress in the job.

    For me it's race home for 3:30, chill out, do some green-fingered stuff (grow fruit/veg), got time to cook complex/time consuming recipes from scratch etc.
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    Wow, you all either are very ambitious or have unrealistic expectations, I'm a new graduate at 22 expecting anything over 20k at that age


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    (Original post by ahannah)
    probably not much, seeing as I am going into the music industry... but I would rather do something I love rather than a boring office job (no offence to anyone who is interested in that, it's not for me)
    this is me
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    £50k and no less. First year maths student. Already have a summer internship with an investment mgr for 2017 (via spring week) who pay this much upon graduation (inlcuding bonuses).
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    (Original post by That Arab Guy)
    this is me
    :cool:
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    I don't care If I get negatively voted but some people are a tad delusional.

    I know Student Room is atypical of normal students in that most people have the perfect journey: excellent grades, extra-curricular activities, top twenty university and then a graduate scheme job straight after university. However the fact that so many folk believe they will earn £45k+ within 3/4 years of graduation is madness.

    The average salary in the U.K. is circa £25k (outside London) and this is heavily skewed due to other factors (folk that earn more - alot more in some cases). The only folk that will have a fighting chance of this are the self-employed, doctors, top 4 accountancy firm employed and of course your financiers working in London.

    I mean fairplay to some of you - ambition is great and It would be lovely if our generation were able to enjoy the fruits of our labour and maybe some of the benefits of previous generations but I can't see it happening. The economic situation does not favour it.

    The naive romanticism about career and life is why previous generations laugh at us.
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    (Original post by jg2012)
    I don't care If I get negatively voted but some people are a tad delusional.

    I know Student Room is atypical of normal students in that most people have the perfect journey: excellent grades, extra-curricular activities, top twenty university and then a graduate scheme job straight after university. However the fact that so many folk believe they will earn £45k+ within 3/4 years of graduation is madness.

    The average salary in the U.K. is circa £25k (outside London) and this is heavily skewed due to other factors (folk that earn more - alot more in some cases). The only folk that will have a fighting chance of this are the self-employed, doctors, top 4 accountancy firm employed and of course your financiers working in London.

    I mean fairplay to some of you - ambition is great and It would be lovely if our generation were able to enjoy the fruits of our labour and maybe some of the benefits of previous generations but I can't see it happening. The economic situation does not favour it.

    The naive romanticism about career and life is why previous generations laugh at us.
    What does 'so many" mean? There are millions earning the figure you've alluded to. A small thread with a few dozen people who want to go into certain careers doesn't seem like 'so many' to me.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    What does 'so many" mean? There are millions earning the figure you've alluded to. A small thread with a few dozen people who want to go into certain careers doesn't seem like 'so many' to me.

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    Relatively speaking. Also from personal experience in university. Then extrapolate this across the demographic and you'll have 'so many' delusional folk.

    My First year economics professor had this exact conversation with us and he was mightily aghast at the delusion of us.

    From an article I've read previously.

    ''Half of people in the UK in 2012-13 had declared taxable income (I make the point carefully) of £21,000 or less. Having income of £49,200 put a person in the top 10% and £150,000 or more, unsurprisingly, in the top 1%.''

    http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2...-really-earns/

    As I said - It woul be brilliant and good on the folk who are ambitious and confident about it but there's no realism talking about £45k+ salaries by the age of 25, for the vast majority of people.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    What does 'so many" mean? There are millions earning the figure you've alluded to. A small thread with a few dozen people who want to go into certain careers doesn't seem like 'so many' to me.

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    Highly unlikely that those "millions" are 25 or under though.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Highly unlikely that those "millions" are 25 or under though.


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    Ahahaha, I can always predict your responses :')
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    (Original post by jg2012)
    Relatively speaking. Also from personal experience in university. Then extrapolate this across the demographic and you'll have 'so many' delusional folk.

    My First year economics professor had this exact conversation with us and he was mightily aghast at the delusion of us.

    From an article I've read previously.

    ''Half of people in the UK in 2012-13 had declared taxable income (I make the point carefully) of £21,000 or less. Having income of £49,200 put a person in the top 10% and £150,000 or more, unsurprisingly, in the top 1%.''

    http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2...-really-earns/

    As I said - It woul be brilliant and good on the folk who are ambitious and confident about it but there's no realism talking about £45k+ salaries by the age of 25, for the vast majority of people.
    Ofc, but the vast majority of people aren't on TSR and aren't posting on this thread!

    Sure if we ran a poll and say 1000+ respondants answered that they're expecting at least £45k+ by 25 then yeah you'd have some basis to argue on. But the distribution on this thread is pretty decent and those who have said so called 'outlandish' figures have an idea of what career they want to do and what it pays.

    In fact, most responses to this thread have been fairly reasonable.

    1% of a big number is still a big number, not to mention that stretches out to close to 10-15% once you factor in the graduates of universities people here are aiming at in general.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Ofc, but the vast majority of people aren't on TSR and aren't posting on this thread!

    Sure if we ran a poll and say 1000+ respondants answered that they're expecting at least £45k+ by 25 then yeah you'd have some basis to argue on. But the distribution on this thread is pretty decent and those who have said so called 'outlandish' figures have an idea of what career they want to do and what it pays.

    In fact, most responses to this thread have been fairly reasonable.

    1% of a big number is still a big number, not to mention that stretches out to close to 10-15% once you factor in the graduates of universities people here are aiming at in general.
    Fair enough.

    Just to point out aswell I'm not meaning to be harsh on anyone personally - I hope every single person in here earns a healthy crust - we're graduating in a poor economic environment and we're the most stressed generation (statistically), it would be nice if something good happened for once.

    I just think its unrealistic at 25. At 30+ more likely.

    Not to sound cheekier but I actually think £35k+ is unrealistic for most by 25. Having worked throughout uni and now entering the world of full-time work, I hardly come across anyone earning this - mad I know. My old manager was earning £20k per annum. My new manager earns £30k per annum but shes 42 and has been earning this fairly recently.

    Salaries just don't seem as generous nowadays. Corporations are squeezing folk and know they have us by the short and curlies.
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    (Original post by jg2012)
    Fair enough.

    Just to point out aswell I'm not meaning to be harsh on anyone personally - I hope every single person in here earns a healthy crust - we're graduating in a poor economic environment and we're the most stressed generation (statistically), it would be nice if something good happened for once.

    I just think its unrealistic at 25. At 30+ more likely.

    Not to sound cheekier but I actually think £35k+ is unrealistic for most by 25. Having worked throughout uni and now entering the world of full-time work, I hardly come across anyone earning this - mad I know. My old manager was earning £20k per annum. My new manager earns £30k per annum but shes 42 and has been earning this fairly recently.

    Salaries just don't seem as generous nowadays. Corporations are squeezing folk and know they have us by the short and curlies.
    Yeah, it definitely does depend on what field you're in and where you're working. E.g. most of the highest paying jobs are in London but the cost of living counteracts the earnings premium.

    I can imagine it being fairly difficult to hit £35k+ by 25 if you're working in say, HR, in Newcastle. But likewise it's pretty standard faire for a qualified accountant in the South East.

    Pay has way too many variables at the end of the day.

    Edit: just wanted to add that earnings potential isn't the be all and end all in a career, nor should it be.

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    I'd be ok with 20k, don't care
    I'm single, no kids and have simple pleasures so my life should generally be well budgeted and ot calling for so much money
    If I earn more then brilliant but I honestly would be ok with just a fine job and steady pay and worker's rights, I'm sorted and happy as Larry
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Because far too many people in here believe that the higher salary job, the greater general life happiness. They will all be in for a gigantic shock. Get a job in a field that you love first, then worry about money. Otherwise you'll just hate your job.

    It's more of a fact of having a general tolerance as tolerance can only get you so far.
    Its good to have financial security, but if you have to drink five cups of coffee a day and finish the week off with strong wine, then you know the deal.
    Early retirement and a paid off mortgage is plus.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Highly unlikely that those "millions" are 25 or under though.


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    There will still be tens of thousands, maybe even a couple of hundred thousand of 25s and unders earning £45k, so I agree with your sentiment.


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    I'm 24, earning £22k and living very comfortably. I love my job and I have enough money to do the things I want so I'm very happy.

    Although, never going to complain about having more money :p:
    May be on about £25k by the time I hit 25
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    (Original post by jbman690)
    hopefully by then i'd have properly learnt how to trade, so i'd be making about 20k a month (if i started now)
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    Realistically, I'll be earning around half a mil a fight 4/5 times a year as the UFC lightweight champ :cool:
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    Or working at Subway while in Uni
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    I've recently turned 25 & I'm now on just over 23K per year. After tax, NI etc it's about 1550 per month. I don't have a mortgage & my car is by far my biggest outgoing so I'm living fairly comfortably although more money would be great.
    I didn't go to uni so I've got no debts (other than my car).

    Apparantly the UK average wage is about 26-27K so if you're earning that or above, especially in your twenties, then I'd say you're doing pretty well (except perhaps in London).
    if you don't mind me asking what did you do instead of university?
 
 
 
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