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Is it worth taking a gap year even if you make your offer? Watch

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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    The whole point of this thread was that I knew I'm capable of A*s, which is what stings.

    The one subject I was predicted an A in (further maths - and rightly so, as I only just got 90% at AS), I am confident I've achieved an A. And I am INFINITELY happy with this achievement, because I know I did the best that I could, even though it's not an A*. But for stuff like maths and physics, it makes me sick to think I ****ed up my exams badly enough to miss the A*s, despite getting full UMS for both subjects in my mocks. I can't help feeling like that.
    If you feel bad for ''only'' achieving an A then I'm sorry but I feel you might have bigger issues at hand. Your self worth as an individual does not rely on your achievements. You are more than just a grade robot. Some people say that perfectionism is a sign of low self esteem. Feeling disappointed in yourself for only getting a C when you were predicted a B-A* is one thing (like myself) feeling disappointed in yourself for getting an A is another thing entirely
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Alright, well, if that is your take on it then obviously you are entitled to that opinion on yourself but please know that employers don't really care much for the difference between an A and an A*. Most employers nowadays care more about the experience you've had in the sector of your choice. As long as you get at least a 2:1 it doesn't really matter. Take my advice and go for a course that offers you a year in industry, I promise you will not regret it.
    I don't ever stating an opinion to the contrary? Only that I understand why someone might be disappointed in not attaining an A* in some scenarios. That being said, my work placement is currently dependent on me achieving very good grades up until the time that I actually take it, so if that's next year, then it will be A levels


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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's like the difference between A* and A. The individual with the A* cares about it, but most other people don't so much.

    And if an employer is choosing between 2 candidates; a postgrad with a 2:1 good ECs and relevant work experience will trump someone with a 1st and no ECs/work experience.

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    (Original post by drandy76)
    I don't ever stating an opinion to the contrary? Only that I understand why someone might be disappointed in not attaining an A* in some scenarios. That being said, my work placement is currently dependent on me achieving very good grades up until the time that I actually take it, so if that's next year, then it will be A levels


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    Is your work placement dependent on achieving an A*? If not I would relax a little personally. An A grade is a very good grade and 3 of them will get you into most medical schools in the UK. If it's good enough for a medical school it's good enough for you
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    The whole point of this thread was that I knew I'm capable of A*s, which is what stings.

    The one subject I was predicted an A in (further maths - and rightly so, as I only just got 90% at AS), I am confident I've achieved an A. And I am INFINITELY happy with this achievement, because I know I did the best that I could, even though it's not an A*. But for stuff like maths and physics, it makes me sick to think I ****ed up my exams badly enough to miss the A*s, despite getting full UMS for both subjects in my mocks. I can't help feeling like that.
    Leaving aside the issue of whether it is worth taking a year out to resit (in my opinion it isn't) you need give at least some consideration as to how you will feel if your gamble does not pay off. You're making the assumption that the issues which made you underachieve (in your view) will go away in a gap year, which may not be the case. You are also not factoring in the issue of going stale from not studying for the whole year. It could be that you do not do any better second time around. Of course, you may, but no one can give any guarantees and you need to consider what this would do to your self esteem, which seems to be rather firmly tied up with academic results.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's like the difference between A* and A. The individual with the A* cares about it, but most other people don't so much.
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    You cheeky *******


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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's like the difference between A* and A. The individual with the A* cares about it, but most other people don't so much.

    And if an employer is choosing between 2 candidates; a postgrad with a 2:1 good ECs and relevant work experience will trump someone with a 1st and no ECs/work experience.

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    Fair enough.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Leaving aside the issue of whether it is worth taking a year out to resit (in my opinion it isn't) you need give at least some consideration as to how you will feel if your gamble does not pay off. You're making the assumption that the issues which made you underachieve (in your view) will go away in a gap year, which may not be the case. You are also not factoring in the issue of going stale from not studying for the whole year. It could be that you do not do any better second time around. Of course, you may, but no one can give any guarantees and you need to consider what this would do to your self esteem, which seems to be rather firmly tied up with academic results.
    This, this, this, this, this!!!
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Leaving aside the issue of whether it is worth taking a year out to resit (in my opinion it isn't) you need give at least some consideration as to how you will feel if your gamble does not pay off. You're making the assumption that the issues which made you underachieve (in your view) will go away in a gap year, which may not be the case. You are also not factoring in the issue of going stale from not studying for the whole year. It could be that you do not do any better second time around. Of course, you may, but no one can give any guarantees and you need to consider what this would do to your self esteem, which seems to be rather firmly tied up with academic results.
    Yeah. Perhaps.
    Every time I think I've done badly, I just tell myself that Brian Cox got a D in A-level maths, and if he's a successful physicist with a D in maths then I can probably be a successful engineer with an A in maths xD
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    Yeah. Perhaps.
    Every time I think I've done badly, I just tell myself that Brian Cox got a D in A-level maths, and if he's a successful physicist with a D in maths then I can probably be a successful engineer with an A in maths xD
    I think you probably can, yes.
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    Yeah. Perhaps.
    Every time I think I've done badly, I just tell myself that Brian Cox got a D in A-level maths, and if he's a successful physicist with a D in maths then I can probably be a successful engineer with an A in maths xD
    You can be more than successful with an A in maths. You need to get it into your head that an A is a brilliant grade. It's not like you're going to die if you don't get an A*
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    If you feel bad for ''only'' achieving an A then I'm sorry but I feel you might have bigger issues at hand. Your self worth as an individual does not rely on your achievements. You are more than just a grade robot. Some people say that perfectionism is a sign of low self esteem. Feeling disappointed in yourself for only getting a C when you were predicted a B-A* is one thing (like myself) feeling disappointed in yourself for getting an A is another thing entirely
    I'm not a perfectionist, or else I'd be aiming for 4 A*s instead of 3 A*s and an A You're right about the unresolved issues though LOL oh well
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    I'm not a perfectionist, or else I'd be aiming for 4 A*s instead of 3 A*s and an A You're right about the unresolved issues though LOL oh well
    I was a bit disappointed that I got a C at A2, but ultimately I don't care because it hasn't affected me in the long run, because I know where my priorities should be. Your priority should be getting into uni and getting the experience that comes with that, not screwing your mental health over trying to up your A Levels by one grade that will ultimately affect your career prospects in anyway
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    You can be more than successful with an A in maths. You need to get it into your head that an A is a brilliant grade. It's not like you're going to die if you don't get an A*
    No, but I was getting A*s easily throughout the year in maths, and I even got the highest C2 mark in my class at AS. It just sucks how much C3 screwed me over and the knock-on effect it had on literally all my other exams, but an A is good and I've accepted my fate

    I called my mum and she's advised me not to take a gap year. I'll probably do that. Hopefully I won't feel the need to in 30 days..
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    No, but I was getting A*s easily throughout the year in maths, and I even got the highest C2 mark in my class at AS. It just sucks how much C3 screwed me over and the knock-on effect it had on literally all my other exams, but an A is good and I've accepted my fate

    I called my mum and she's advised me not to take a gap year. I'll probably do that. Hopefully I won't feel the need to in 30 days..
    An A is more than "good". There are only cons to you taking a gap year given your circumstances.
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    I was a bit disappointed that I got a C at A2, but ultimately I don't care because it hasn't affected me in the long run, because I know where my priorities should be. Your priority should be getting into uni and getting the experience that comes with that, not screwing your mental health over trying to up your A Levels by one grade that will ultimately affect your career prospects in anyway
    A-Levels are not just about career prospects though. I really, really wanted to gain a thorough grounding in the maths and physics that will underpin the ideas covered in my degree. And I love learning - not getting an A in physics to me is a slap in the face, because it tells me that I haven't learned as effectively as I could have done, and there are gaps in my knowledge.
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    A-Levels are not just about career prospects though. I really, really wanted to gain a thorough grounding in the maths and physics that will underpin the ideas covered in my degree. And I love learning - not getting an A in physics to me is a slap in the face, because it tells me that I haven't learned as effectively as I could have done, and there are gaps in my knowledge.
    An an A represents that you have that grounding. A uni wouldn't accept you with an A in maths and physics if they didn't consider it a good enough grounding what's covered in the degree.
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    An an A represents that you have that grounding. A uni wouldn't accept you with an A in maths and physics if they didn't consider it a good enough grounding what's covered in the degree.
    Oh yeah I forgot that I've most likely met my offer, and that my university wouldn't have given me that offer if they didn't think it was enough to successfully complete the course! That makes me feel better.
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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    A-Levels are not just about career prospects though. I really, really wanted to gain a thorough grounding in the maths and physics that will underpin the ideas covered in my degree. And I love learning - not getting an A in physics to me is a slap in the face, because it tells me that I haven't learned as effectively as I could have done, and there are gaps in my knowledge.
    There's no gaps in your knowledge. You covered the material already.

    You just didn't quite answer the questions as well as you could (assuming your predictions are correct, which they might not be).

    It happens. Move on

    I mean you only need 70% to get a 1st at uni. How slack is that compared to an A*



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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    Oh yeah I forgot that I've most likely met my offer, and that my university wouldn't have given me that offer if they didn't think it was enough to successfully complete the course! That makes me feel better.
    There you go. You just have to actually use your brain and think about the context of everything, and the viewpoint of the admissions tutors
 
 
 
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