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British students may be excluded from Erasmus after Brexit Watch

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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Given that language courses have perfectly respectable employment rates, this is a pretty silly thing to say. Being fluent in three languages is very valuable and you're forgetting two important points: firstly, language degrees are not just about the language, they generally offer modules in a whole range of other aspects of the other country like history, economics, politics and culture. Secondly, since most professional jobs don't require specific degrees anyway, most language graduates (as with most graduates) will end up going into a career that isn't directly related to their undergraduate degree where the transferable skills rather than the actual subject content is most important. And language degrees are regarding as being challenging.
    So if you don't plan to use your language why spend a year abroad soaking up sun? They don't send politics students to work in the state senate, so this extends the argument of the pointlessness of sending you. And why you, anyway? Why not a bilingual arts student?
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    Hmm, don't think that will have much effect since most of the traffic is the other way.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I've just realised that if I gave an antagonistic response to this I'd be trading insults with an 18 year old on the internet. This isn't something I particularly want to do, so I'll restrict myself to suggesting that you might have misinterpreted my response to your comment about my peers if you think I was bragging about my intelligence, and that perhaps it would be better not to take up more space in the thread with this.
    I was not suggesting that your peers are stupid, I was talking about the particular people you were referring to. Anyway, you continue to base your comments on faulty assumptions or deductions, as I am not 18 nor was I hurling insults at anyone.
    Apologies if you were personally offended, let me rephrase my comment in a less assaultive manner.
    Perhaps your friends who went on the Erasmus programme were not studying a course where such experience would be of benefit to them? Or perhaps they just didn't bother to learn?

    And a bit of an advice, do not insult the intelligence of someone you don't know, based on nothing.
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    If we do lose Erasmus then students will have to take out more loans to pay for their year abroad. Language degrees will become more expensive relative to other subjects and fewer people will choose to study them at university. This matters, our economy needs foreign language speakers.

    (Original post by Ethereal)
    Well no. You said the main benefit of degrees is transferable skills not the content, so I am simply applying your logic. How does a year abroad in another country enhance your transferable skills beyond what you can get simply by doing a degree?

    The mere fact you want to spend a year abroad does not make it useful.
    The purpose of a language degree is to learn to speak that language. Whether or not a graduate uses their language skills later in life is irrelevant. In order to properly learn a language it is necessary to spend time abroad practicing with native speakers. Immersion is the key to language learning. Surely you don't disagree?
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    If we do lose Erasmus then students will have to take out more loans to pay for their year abroad. Language degrees will become more expensive relative to other subjects and fewer people will choose to study them at university. This matters, our economy needs foreign language speakers.



    The purpose of a language degree is to learn to speak that language. Whether or not a graduate uses their language skills later in life is irrelevant. In order to properly learn a language it is necessary to spend time abroad practicing with native speakers. Immersion is the key to language learning. Surely you don't disagree?
    I'm really not in a position to comment on the necessity or not of the year abroad - I dropped languages as soon as I could at school. I have to say it should be possible in theory to manage without - history students don't have tardis based field trips.

    My real point was that if you follow the logic of the post I quoted it definitely renders the year pointless.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    I'm really not in a position to comment on the necessity or not of the year abroad - I dropped languages as soon as I could at school. I have to say it should be possible in theory to manage without - history students don't have tardis based field trips.

    My real point was that if you follow the logic of the post I quoted it definitely renders the year pointless.
    Why should language students have to manage without? Yes, it is possible to learn vocab and grammar in the classroom and you can even talk to native speakers online, but living day-to-day in a language and having to speak it constantly is the only way to turn passive knowledge into fluent spoken language. That is just a fact of life.

    Also, language students who don't go abroad do significantly worse in their finals compared to those who do.
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    I dont understand the logic. It wont be illegal for a british university to ask a university in europe if they can send students there for a year and set up some sort of agreement outside this erasmus framework. Just remember many universities offer students to study in america, asia or africa so if they can do this im sure they can manage to set up something with european unis
 
 
 
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