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    (Original post by tammie123)
    Okay that seems reasonable, as long as you can also see that deciding what others should and shouldn't wear isn't acceptable
    Of course it's acceptable, I don't want to see naked people in the subway, or a business has every right to set a dress code for its employees.
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    Banning the Burkini isn't needed for "security reasons" (a justification used for banning the face veil), so it is unnecessary. I think that the ban was more to do with anti-Muslim bigotry than it was with misogyny, as the stated reason was that it showed "affiliation with terrorist groups", when really it's nothing more than religious swimwear. This implies that being a Muslim means that you are affiliated with terrorists.

    On one hand, the women who choose to cover their hair are being told what they can and can't wear, which is misogynistic, although I personally don't agree with the hijab and the "purpose" behind it. It is important in a free and democratic society that everyone can wear what they want, be that Dastars for Sikh men, Kippah's for Jewish men or hijabs for Muslim women. On the other hand, the women who do not choose to wear it and only do so due to pressure from their families or communities are being further restricted from fun, leisure activities because there is no way they can go swimming without it.
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    (Original post by Brahmin of Booty)
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    Freudian slip there
    No. simple typo but love the way you hint I'd turn violent over something so asinine as a religious symbol.
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    The judge has rejected the request from the Collectif Contre l'Islamophobie en France against the burkini ban in Cannes.

    He said that nobody can use their religion to ask for a special treatment and that wearing that sort of clothing in the current context is more than an act of devotion.

    http://www.lemonde.fr/societe/articl...2397_3224.html
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    (Original post by tammie123)
    Okay that seems reasonable, as long as you can also see that deciding what others should and shouldn't wear isn't acceptable
    Yes it is reasonable.

    But no there are all sorts of occasions where being told what you can or can't wear is acceptable.
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    [QUOTE=Josb;66911842]The judge has rejected the request from the Collectif Contre l'Islamophobie en France against the burkini ban in Cannes.

    He said that nobody can use their religion to ask for a special treatment and that wearing that sort of clothing in the current context is more than an act of devotion.

    http://www.lemonde.fr/societe/articl...ml [/QUOTE]

    Good news
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Of course it's acceptable, I don't want to see naked people in the subway, or a business has every right to set a dress code for its employees.
    Private corporations that right, there is an argument that nudity should be banned on public transport for hygiene reasons, but in general it's wrong to ban nudity.

    (Original post by BaconandSauce)
    No. simple typo but love the way you hint I'd turn violent over something so asinine as a religious symbol.
    I'm winding you up for being so mean-spirited.
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    There seem to be more non Muslims on this thread than Muslims, who disagree with you... You seem to basically be one of two people who actually support this ban
    yes and none of us are French either so agreement or disagreement is irrelevant given the Majority (i.e. the French and it's courts and the Law) just supported the ban
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    (Original post by Josb)
    The judge has rejected the request from the Collectif Contre l'Islamophobie en France against the burkini ban in Cannes.

    He said that nobody can use their religion to ask for a special treatment and that wearing that sort of clothing in the current context is more than an act of devotion.

    http://www.lemonde.fr/societe/articl...2397_3224.html
    How does a woman wanting to wear the burkini correlate to asking for special treatment?

    The last paragraph of the article though..So the ban isn't simply about the prohibition of religious signs, it's about prohibiting 'ostentatious outfits that reference allegiance to terrorist movements that wage war on us'. So in the eyes of the French, burkini wearer=ISIS supporter? Disgusting
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    The banning of the burkini was an extraordinarily misogynistic move to make. The ban is symbolistic of the west's constant attempts to silence and speak over Muslim women. The people of the west incessantly label us as oppressed, unintelligent and submissive, yet when we choose to cover ourselves (in accordance with the guidelines of our faith) the media instantly mistakes us for oppressed beings who need to be rescued. The ban is counterproductive- the choice of covering up is being taken away. This is inherently hypocritical- the west is trying to 'rescue' us by taking away our rights. Meanwhile, Muslim men are able to meet their required clothing guidelines on the beach.
    For the record, in the west, even though many of us choose to cover up, we are not oppressed. There are hijabi television personalities, Olympic athletes, professors, journalists and more, and yet people still perceive us as dumb fools who are unable to voice our opinions.
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    (Original post by BaconandSauce)
    Yes it is reasonable.

    But no there are all sorts of occasions where being told what you can or can't wear is acceptable.
    (Original post by Josb)
    Of course it's acceptable, I don't want to see naked people in the subway, or a business has every right to set a dress code for its employees.
    When making any decision its only logical to weigh up the pros and cons. For example with the nudity example you just brought up, the pros of allowing people to walk around naked is: it makes the people who have decided to go out naked happy. But the cons far outweigh the pros and they are as follows: children may be exposed to these people and it may cause distress. But what are the cons of allowing people to wear these burkinis? Please enlighten me!
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    Following this ban, if a Muslim woman wears a full body swimsuit with a waterproof hijab or swim cap, there is no issue right? But when the form of clothing is labelled as a burkini, all hell breaks loose. This ban won't encourage secularism or promote Muslim women to discard 'oppressive' dressing. For example, let's say there is indeed a Muslim woman forced to wear the burkini on the beach;Now that it's banned, she can just be forced to opt for another form of clothing that serves the same purpose. In this case, has the ban truly challenged oppression or the connotations behind the reasoning of the burkini? What's next, banning Muslim women from covering up full stop?
    What a joke. Let's not pretend this ban was an attempt to liberate Muslim Women. It's just a reflection of France's anti-Muslim bigotry.
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    (Original post by tammie123)
    When making any decision its only logical to weigh up the pros and cons. For example with the nudity example you just brought up, the pros of allowing people to walk around naked is: it makes the people who have decided to go out naked happy. But the cons far outweigh the pros and they are as follows: children may be exposed to these people and it may cause distress. But what are the cons of allowing people to wear these burkinis? Please enlighten me!
    As you suggest a naked body is distressing, perhaps a burkini is also distressing.

    Clothing is far less natural than nudity and you can't try and twist people sunbathing into some form of wild perversion anymore than somebody else can say a burkini is a form of abuse that should be banned.

    Naked bodies are only visibly distressing when they're attached to a paedophile or rapist in much the same way a burka or burkini is only distressing when attached to a terrorist. And unfortunately you can't tell either by looking at them unless they make it obvious.
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    (Original post by childofthesun)
    How does a woman wanting to wear the burkini correlate to asking for special treatment?
    It's the judge's answer to the complainants, who asked to retain access to the beach in the name of their religion.

    (Original post by childofthesun)
    The last paragraph of the article though..So the ban isn't simply about the prohibition of religious signs, it's about prohibiting 'ostentatious outfits that reference allegiance to terrorist movements that wage war on us'. So in the eyes of the French, burkini wearer=ISIS supporter? Disgusting
    The mayor says that as these outfits are recommended by ISIS, we should ban them.

    He hasn't said that burkini wearers were terrorists, but that they -- unconsciously or not -- participate in their propaganda. I agree with him.
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    (Original post by tammie123)
    When making any decision its only logical to weigh up the pros and cons. For example with the nudity example you just brought up, the pros of allowing people to walk around naked is: it makes the people who have decided to go out naked happy. But the cons far outweigh the pros and they are as follows: children may be exposed to these people and it may cause distress. But what are the cons of allowing people to wear these burkinis? Please enlighten me!
    Some people -- actually the large majority of the French, and, by judging the comments on the Independent, possibly a good number of the British as well -- find the burqa and burkini as distressing as other people find nudity distressing.
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    I can understand banning the Burka because what they actually did was ban all head coverings which makes legitimate sense. This just seems like an attack on a faith.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Some people -- actually the large majority of the French, and, by judging the comments on the Independent, possibly a good number of the British as well -- find the burqa and burkini as distressing as other people find nudity distressing.
    lol you and I both know that thats ridiculous

    the nudity law is for children, they shouldn't be seeing things like that at that age
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    (Original post by tammie123)
    lol you and I both know that thats ridiculous

    the nudity law is for children, they shouldn't be seeing things like that at that age
    You say it is rediculous but that is a different culture just like in some places women go topless
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    (Original post by joecphillips)
    You say it is rediculous but that is a different culture just like in some places women go topless
    what do you mean I don't understand your point
 
 
 
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