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    I really want to get 3A*'s, taking Chemistry, Biology and Maths (and General Studies ) Any advice from anyone who has done these subjects? Much appreciated!
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    (Original post by mahmzo)
    Can someone please explain to me if i can acheive an A* in maths.
    I got 234 UMS at AS. It says you need 480 UMS overall plus 180 in C3 and C4 does that mean i need 500 to get an a*. Or is it 480 ( including the 180 in c3 and c4)
    You're right 500UMS put simply.

    So 80UMS average in 4 other units
    And 90UMS average in C3 and C4
    (100+80 even and vice versa)

    As long as the 4 other units add up to 320+
    And C3 and C4 add up to 180+
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    (Original post by Maths is Life)
    You're right 500UMS put simply.

    So 80UMS average in 4 other units
    And 90UMS average in C3 and C4
    (100+80 even and vice versa)

    As long as the 4 other units add up to 320+
    And C3 and C4 add up to 180+
    That's completely wrong.

    It's 180 in C3+C4 and 480 overall.
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    (Original post by Accountingggo)
    You need to revise from the start to the end. Be exam ready AT LEAST a month and a half before exams. Do every practice paper you can find. If I were you, I wouldn't redo further as it's meaningless in terms of uni offers- focus on your A2's as the work load is often 2x harder at least. Don't ever hesitate to ask for help if you're stuck- you've gotta be selfish if you wanna achieve the best you can. Don't think because you got good AS results, it means that you'll be fine- remember your AS results for the sciences don't matter, you NEED 90ums in A2 exams. Don't overwork and make sure you get a rest- before exams, you shouldn't be at all stressed as you should be ready from prior preparation.
    Good luck.


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    What if youre AS results werent the best but you get A*A*A at A2, and apply after a gap year after your A2 year (therefore using your actual A2 grades to apply), will unis still take into consideration your AS grades as much and lead to it hindering your application.
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    (Original post by Chemgawd99)
    for AS I achieved AAAC in maths, physics, chemistry and further maths respectively. For my A2 year, I will be studying maths, physics and chemistry and retaking AS FM. I hope to get 3A* and an A. Do you have any tips on doing this task, plus are A2's harder than AS?
    For maths, I didn't find it harder, tbh. You're just building upon what you've done before. If you've understood the AS content properly, it should follow easily enough.

    My advice would be not to work too intensively early on in the year. Make sure you understand the content throughout the course, and start exam prep when you're a couple of months away from the exams, increasing gradually as they get closer. If you were to treat learning as a 9-5 job for most of the year, and you're reasonably good at the subjects, that would be plenty. All that you achieve by working every waking moment from the beginning of the year is to increase the risk that you're sick to death of exam prep by April, when you actually really need to be on your A game (so to speak).
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    For maths, I didn't find it harder, tbh. You're just building upon what you've done before. If you've understood the AS content properly, it should follow easily enough.
    I got a B in maths that was 3 UMS off an A. I will be resitting C1 & C2 next year, do you reckon C1 & C2 will become a lot easier after doing C3 & C4? I believe I revised way too little for Maths last year, as in I probably did about 10 past papers total for all three modules. Not going to make the same mistake again though.
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    (Original post by isabella1999)
    I really want to get 3A*'s, taking Chemistry, Biology and Maths (and General Studies ) Any advice from anyone who has done these subjects? Much appreciated!
    So, I got 3 A*s in those subjects, and each of the subjects needs a different approach. With maths, just practise over and over until you get used to the basics, once you can do the basics inside out (by basics, I mean the basic theory, such as how to do differentiation and integration etc) then start doing exam questions to get used to applying the basic theory. Also, don't bother revising stuff you're good at, I always enjoyed becoming an expert in all the really hard stuff so that I could do the hard stuff as if it was easy stuff, and because the easy stuff was already easy, it made most things easy. The tricky thing with maths is not the content, it's the questions, and knowing what do to get to an answer. That is why practise is important. Chemistry is all about just memorising facts, it was the most fact heavy subject I did at A-level, and sadly it is all down to how good your memory is, there was no problem solving in my chemistry exams, and they pretty much asked the same questions every year, so if you did the past papers then you're pretty set. The best you can do with biology is know all the theory inside out and then do your best to apply that theory to the horrible how-science-works questions that they ask in exams. Biology grade boundaries are always low to compensate for how awful the exams are. But yh, if you know the theory then you can get easy marks in the factual recall questions and then fill in the gaps by answering the HSW questions as best you can. Those questions do require some initiative at the end of the day, which can be hard to train, that's why I did very few biology past papers, there wasn't anything to gain from them really. Anyway, things may have changed in the year since I did my exams, and also, I apologise if the layout of this message is screwed up, it seems quite messed up while I'm writing it
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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    So, I got 3 A*s in those subjects, and each of the subjects needs a different approach. With maths, just practise over and over until you get used to the basics, once you can do the basics inside out (by basics, I mean the basic theory, such as how to do differentiation and integration etc) then start doing exam questions to get used to applying the basic theory. Also, don't bother revising stuff you're good at, I always enjoyed becoming an expert in all the really hard stuff so that I could do the hard stuff as if it was easy stuff, and because the easy stuff was already easy, it made most things easy. The tricky thing with maths is not the content, it's the questions, and knowing what do to get to an answer. That is why practise is important. Chemistry is all about just memorising facts, it was the most fact heavy subject I did at A-level, and sadly it is all down to how good your memory is, there was no problem solving in my chemistry exams, and they pretty much asked the same questions every year, so if you did the past papers then you're pretty set. The best you can do with biology is know all the theory inside out and then do your best to apply that theory to the horrible how-science-works questions that they ask in exams. Biology grade boundaries are always low to compensate for how awful the exams are. But yh, if you know the theory then you can get easy marks in the factual recall questions and then fill in the gaps by answering the HSW questions as best you can. Those questions do require some initiative at the end of the day, which can be hard to train, that's why I did very few biology past papers, there wasn't anything to gain from them really. Anyway, things may have changed in the year since I did my exams, and also, I apologise if the layout of this message is screwed up, it seems quite messed up while I'm writing it
    What revision guide did you use for biology?
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    (Original post by alow)
    That's completely wrong.

    It's 180 in C3+C4 and 480 overall.
    My bad - allow it
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    (Original post by manlike99)
    What revision guide did you use for biology?
    The AQA textbook, I think it's the Nelson Thornes one
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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    The AQA textbook, I think it's the Nelson Thornes one
    do you think the CGP one is too simplified?
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    Someone may have said this already, I don't know because:
    1- I can't be asked to read all the other posts, I've got my 3A* grades already (Maths, FM and phys.)
    2- If it has been said before, it's still important.

    My golden rule: USE YOUR TEACHERS HELP!!!
    You wouldn't forget the rescouses of past papers or notes, but teachers are by far the most useful revision recourse you have and nothing will ever top them, if you don't understand something, ask them, they know the answer and will (hopefully) go the extra mile to teach you something you don't understand, even in their own time [Mine always did!]. That's not to say other advice isn't useful, you still have to work hard and stuff, but this is the one mistake loads of students make (if it embarrasses you to ask a teacher out loud/by hand up, stay in class after the others have left. it may be a bit degrading but it's definitely worth it!).

    Hope this helps and good luck!😄
    On another note, it's my first post on student room! Yay me!
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    (Original post by manlike99)
    do you think the CGP one is too simplified?
    They can be helpful, but they're not necessary. I used the textbook and wikipedia to help me understand everything, and I don't mean for this to sound big headed but, I knew more than most people did. Infact, everyone I know who got an A* in biology didn't use CGP, it was used more by the people who got B's, maybe A's. That's not to say that they're bad, some A* students may have found them useful, idk
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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    They can be helpful, but they're not necessary. I used the textbook and wikipedia to help me understand everything, and I don't mean for this to sound big headed but, I knew more than most people did. Infact, everyone I know who got an A* in biology didn't use CGP, it was used more by the people who got B's, maybe A's. That's not to say that they're bad, some A* students may have found them useful, idk
    thanks man
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    (Original post by Chemgawd99)
    very harsh but true lol. I'm ready to delete my facebook , snapchat etc you name it
    bullsht.
    I got A*A*A*A and I was facebooking every day quite a lot. It's true that I don't really have a social life though, but that's only because I'm not interested.
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    Just use yours frees properly
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    (Original post by Chemgawd99)
    for AS I achieved AAAC in maths, physics, chemistry and further maths respectively. For my A2 year, I will be studying maths, physics and chemistry and retaking AS FM. I hope to get 3A* and an A. Do you have any tips on doing this task, plus are A2's harder than AS?

    It will be easier if you drop one A level. Probably FM, or if you need that quit another subject so you can focus on it.
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    Although I got an A* in English Literature without fully reading one of my set texts and not having it in the exam so I'm not the best person to take advice from!


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    (Original post by AortaStudyMore)
    So, I got 3 A*s in those subjects, and each of the subjects needs a different approach. With maths, just practise over and over until you get used to the basics, once you can do the basics inside out (by basics, I mean the basic theory, such as how to do differentiation and integration etc) then start doing exam questions to get used to applying the basic theory. Also, don't bother revising stuff you're good at, I always enjoyed becoming an expert in all the really hard stuff so that I could do the hard stuff as if it was easy stuff, and because the easy stuff was already easy, it made most things easy. The tricky thing with maths is not the content, it's the questions, and knowing what do to get to an answer. That is why practise is important. Chemistry is all about just memorising facts, it was the most fact heavy subject I did at A-level, and sadly it is all down to how good your memory is, there was no problem solving in my chemistry exams, and they pretty much asked the same questions every year, so if you did the past papers then you're pretty set. The best you can do with biology is know all the theory inside out and then do your best to apply that theory to the horrible how-science-works questions that they ask in exams. Biology grade boundaries are always low to compensate for how awful the exams are. But yh, if you know the theory then you can get easy marks in the factual recall questions and then fill in the gaps by answering the HSW questions as best you can. Those questions do require some initiative at the end of the day, which can be hard to train, that's why I did very few biology past papers, there wasn't anything to gain from them really. Anyway, things may have changed in the year since I did my exams, and also, I apologise if the layout of this message is screwed up, it seems quite messed up while I'm writing it
    Thanks! Okay yeah will do for maths, for AS I just went through all papers then the soloman ones too but our exam was honestly worse than those papers 😂 Chemistry I think with new spec was more thinking required now not just memory, some application and I'm not a fan of that! I get your point about biology I hate those how science works questions guess I will just have to learn the basic principles and hopefully will get better over time at applying them. It's fine, thanks so much!
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    You'll be absolutely fine as long as you work hard (but not too hard!) I think the most important thing for me was past papers. In lessons it's good to make the most of your teachers, and make sure you properly understand all of the topics as you go along, but once you've got that understood then just do all of the papers you can find! And mark yourself harshly writing down notes from the mark scheme and revising from that Revise well for end of topic test- this then automatically causes you to revise for the real thing in advance and makes it easier later
    Oooh also for maths there are great youtube channels like the dude on ExamSolutions and also Hegartymaths (I think??) that explain stuff really well. Oh and did i mention past papers?
    And don't worry about the people saying to drop everything and just study- its so important that you balance your work; make sure you're giving yourself enough time to do things you enjoy and see your friends/family-> always always always put your mental health first! Just pace yourself and be kind to yourself- don't let exams define you or take over
 
 
 
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