British universities vs Dutch universities

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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Any opinions?
    If you go there, you'll never get back.
    #brexit
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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    If you go there, you'll never get back.
    #brexit
    I have 3 years to find me a Dutchman then. So I'll be both in and out of the EU
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    Definitely, I do not know anything about Mathematics because I am applying for Liberal Arts and Sciences in the Netherlands but a cursory search shows that there are only three programs in the undergraduate level in the Netherlands that offer a Mathematics degree in English and they are concentrated in two universities, University of Groningen and University of Twente. Not sure how they compare to British universities in terms of prestige. Unfortunately, the only thing I know about Groningen is their football team because Luis Suarez played there.

    Here's the link to the programs I found:

    http://www.eunicas.ie/index.php/euni...ll&searchword=
    thanks for this hmm it seems neither of them are top 100 universities either for maths or in general. I guess they are decent back up options compared to open university which would cost more and give me less. However If I can make it I still want to be able to say I went to a world class university. I guess if i cannot get into a world top 100 this is what I should do.

    So this is really helpful and thanks for the reference, this is still the back up option though. Looks like open university is no longer an option this is cheaper.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    thanks for this hmm it seems neither of them are top 100 universities either for maths or in general. I guess they are decent back up options compared to open university which would cost more and give me less. However If I can make it I still want to be able to say I went to a world class university. I guess if i cannot get into a world top 100 this is what I should do.

    So this is really helpful and thanks for the reference, this is still the back up option though. Looks like open university is no longer an option this is cheaper.
    No problem, good luck on your applications.
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    No problem, good luck on your applications.
    Let me know how you do!
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    You might want to talk your family about it not us. If they are the ones who would have to support you they should get a say.

    I think you'll be better off in the UK. Why? Because the repayments aren't bad(nothing under 21k) and you'll have a loan to help you live.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Let me know how you do!
    Of course, hope you get into both your UK choices and Netherlands choices so you have an opportunity to choose where you want to go.
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    Of course, hope you get into both your UK choices and Netherlands choices so you have an opportunity to choose where you want to go.
    Thanks you too!
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Right so I'm applying for 5 British universities here in the UK (Nottingham/Glasgow are my aspirational unis but I'd go for Notts since its closer to my hometown). I'm also applying to Dutch universities as well which I've read about a lot and really like the ones I've applied to.

    My mind ends up changing every other day and there's pros and cons of going to either a British or a Dutch uni.

    Pros of going to a Dutch uni- It's much cheaper, it has my course taught in English, they do internships at publishing houses (which is what I want to go into) and my aspirational Dutch uni is in an amazing city.

    Cons of going to a Dutch uni- Holidays are way shorter, workload is incredibly intense in the first year, uni starts on the 1st September and I don't get any student loans (so basically would have to rely on my family for income)


    My friends are saying that I'd probably be better off at a Dutch uni but I'm honestly torn between a British uni or a Dutch one. I've applied to my Dutch unis and just need to put in my grades. I'm sending off my UCAS next week.


    Any opinions?



    Josb
    I would love to study abroad, so If there is any possibility of getting a scholarship, I would say aim for a Dutch university. Also, if you have the money don't let anything stop you from trying to broaden your view as much as possible - just make sure you're very passionate about your subject so that you can cope with the load. There will probably be available support for you no matter the university you go for (don't take my word for it, though).
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    (Original post by Keen_student)
    I would love to study abroad, so If there is any possibility of getting a scholarship, I would say aim for a Dutch university. Also, if you have the money don't let anything stop you from trying to broaden your view as much as possible - just make sure you're very passionate about your subject so that you can cope with the load. There will probably be available support for you no matter the university you go for (don't take my word for it, though).
    I'm surprised no one's tackled the topic of how foreign degree go down with British employers. From what I'm aware of, not very well!

    I have a European friend who's mom used to work as a doctor in her home country. When they moved to the UK her mom's degree wasn't accepted by the NHS hospitals and she wasn't even accepted as a nurse until she took a UK nursing course!
    I have also recently read an article about someone from a European country- can't remember which, but have a strong feeling it might have been dutch actually -who was a physiotherapist in his country but wasn't taken by the NHS in the UK, and after years wasting time on short courses he just decided to open his own private clinique.

    This might apply almost only for sensitive kind of jobs like in the health sector, but I do remember having this Polish friend who studied psychology back in Poland and said that her degree wasn't worth much during her job search here in the UK. She even mentioned that she was filling this online job application and they asked her what uni she graduated from at some point in the form, but there wasn't a space to enter her uni, only a drop down menu with British universities only! And there was no option to select "Other" or something, meaning that the employer only takes people from British unis.
    I do personally remember seeing drop menus similar to what she described in job apps I've filled before.

    I believe courses for the same subject can be hugely different in different countries (even European countries). Every country has its own cultural context and views things from different perspectives. Companies also operate differently and each country has its own work culture and work practices...etc. Things are done differently.
    British employers are also familiar with British degrees and British companies. So if you say you've done course X in uni Y, they'd know roughly what you learnt and what to expect from you in terms of skills. Most of their hires would have been grads from the UK, so they're familiar with their background. So if you come from an "unfamiliar" background, that might put them off...etc.
    There's also the thing that employer references (from your internships) are covered by a set of laws (honesty..etc) in the UK, but not the same applies in the Netherlands, so it might be that they don't necessary trust that you've done whatever you're claiming you did over in Holland...

    So for my part, I would recommend doing most of your degree and internships in the UK as they're directly relevant (and understood) by British employers. A year abroad would be good though as it would give you more of an international insight which is recommended but not necessary.
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    (Original post by candyaljamila)
    I'm surprised no one's tackled the topic of how foreign degree go down with British employers. From what I'm aware of, not very well!

    I have a European friend who's mom used to work as a doctor in her home country. When they moved to the UK her mom's degree wasn't accepted by the NHS hospitals and she wasn't even accepted as a nurse until she took a UK nursing course!
    I have also recently read an article about someone from a European country- can't remember which, but have a strong feeling it might have been dutch actually -who was a physiotherapist in his country but wasn't taken by the NHS in the UK, and after years wasting time on short courses he just decided to open his own private clinique.

    This might apply almost only for sensitive kind of jobs like in the health sector, but I do remember having this Polish friend who studied psychology back in Poland and said that her degree wasn't worth much during her job search here in the UK. She even mentioned that she was filling this online job application and they asked her what uni she graduated from at some point in the form, but there wasn't a space to enter her uni, only a drop down menu with British universities only! And there was no option to select "Other" or something, meaning that the employer only takes people from British unis.
    I do personally remember seeing drop menus similar to what she described in job apps I've filled before.

    I believe courses for the same subject can be hugely different in different countries (even European countries). Every country has its own cultural context and views things from different perspectives. Companies also operate differently and each country has its own work culture and work practices...etc. Things are done differently.
    British employers are also familiar with British degrees and British companies. So if you say you've done course X in uni Y, they'd know roughly what you learnt and what to expect from you in terms of skills. Most of their hires would have been grads from the UK, so they're familiar with their background. So if you come from an "unfamiliar" background, that might put them off...etc.
    There's also the thing that employer references (from your internships) are covered by a set of laws (honesty..etc) in the UK, but not the same applies in the Netherlands, so it might be that they don't necessary trust that you've done whatever you're claiming you did over in Holland...

    So for my part, I would recommend doing most of your degree and internships in the UK as they're directly relevant (and understood) by British employers. A year abroad would be good though as it would give you more of an international insight which is recommended but not necessary.
    These are really good points you've made - I didn't even think about that! But perhaps transnational companies e.g. PWC would appreciate degrees from foreign universities more than parts of the public sector? What do you think?
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    (Original post by Keen_student)
    These are really good points you've made - I didn't even think about that! But perhaps transnational companies e.g. PWC would appreciate degrees from foreign universities more than parts of the public sector? What do you think?
    I've had foreign friends who were excellent in their mother tongue (duh!) and had IELTS/TOEFEL certificates proving their proficiency in English as well as doing a course in English and their mother tongue in their country. That still wasn't accepted as proof of being able to translate from one language to the other for British employers!

    Lots of them would rather take someone who's slightly less fluent but who's got UK recognised degrees like NVQs and community translation certificates than someone who's excellent because it's their mother tongue but has foreign degrees/experiences the employer isn't familiar with!

    It might also be that these employers simply prefer to employ British people rather than them having doubts about the qualifications. But thought I'd report what I've heard from personal experience and leave the OP and anyone else to come up with their own conclusions.
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    (Original post by candyaljamila)
    I've had foreign friends who were excellent in their mother tongue (duh!) and had IELTS/TOEFEL certificates proving their proficiency in English as well as doing a course in English and their mother tongue in their country. That still wasn't accepted as proof of being able to translate from one language to the other for British employers!

    Lots of them would rather take someone who's slightly less fluent but who's got UK recognised degrees like NVQs and community translation certificates than someone who's excellent because it's their mother tongue but has foreign degrees/experiences the employer isn't familiar with!

    It might also be that these employers simply prefer to employ British people rather than them having doubts about the qualifications. But thought I'd report what I've heard from personal experience and leave the OP and anyone else to come up with their own conclusions.
    You bring up some points that are pretty deep and need to look into. My main plan is basically go to the Netherlands for my undergrad and then come back to England for my Masters and phD.

    And I am British btw. I just want to go abroad for uni.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    You bring up some points that are pretty deep and need to look into. My main plan is basically go to the Netherlands for my undergrad and then come back to England for my Masters and phD.

    And I am British btw. I just want to go abroad for uni.
    i am not the only one who thinks that this is a bad idea
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    (Original post by john2054)
    i am not the only one who thinks that this is a bad idea
    And?

    I'd rather go by my gut feeling and by someone whose studied in the Netherlands. Tell me, have you studied abroad?
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    And?

    I'd rather go by my gut feeling and by someone whose studied in the Netherlands. Tell me, have you studied abroad?
    No, but i did bring my wife over from Kenya in 2013.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    No, but i did bring my wife over from Kenya in 2013.

    So you haven't studied abroad? Great thanks for clearing that up!
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    (Original post by SomeGuyHere)
    You might want to talk your family about it not us. If they are the ones who would have to support you they should get a say.

    I think you'll be better off in the UK. Why? Because the repayments aren't bad(nothing under 21k) and you'll have a loan to help you live.
    (Original post by candyaljamila)
    I'm surprised no one's tackled the topic of how foreign degree go down with British employers. From what I'm aware of, not very well!

    I have a European friend who's mom used to work as a doctor in her home country. When they moved to the UK her mom's degree wasn't accepted by the NHS hospitals and she wasn't even accepted as a nurse until she took a UK nursing course!
    I have also recently read an article about someone from a European country- can't remember which, but have a strong feeling it might have been dutch actually -who was a physiotherapist in his country but wasn't taken by the NHS in the UK, and after years wasting time on short courses he just decided to open his own private clinique.

    This might apply almost only for sensitive kind of jobs like in the health sector, but I do remember having this Polish friend who studied psychology back in Poland and said that her degree wasn't worth much during her job search here in the UK. She even mentioned that she was filling this online job application and they asked her what uni she graduated from at some point in the form, but there wasn't a space to enter her uni, only a drop down menu with British universities only! And there was no option to select "Other" or something, meaning that the employer only takes people from British unis.
    I do personally remember seeing drop menus similar to what she described in job apps I've filled before.

    I believe courses for the same subject can be hugely different in different countries (even European countries). Every country has its own cultural context and views things from different perspectives. Companies also operate differently and each country has its own work culture and work practices...etc. Things are done differently.
    British employers are also familiar with British degrees and British companies. So if you say you've done course X in uni Y, they'd know roughly what you learnt and what to expect from you in terms of skills. Most of their hires would have been grads from the UK, so they're familiar with their background. So if you come from an "unfamiliar" background, that might put them off...etc.
    There's also the thing that employer references (from your internships) are covered by a set of laws (honesty..etc) in the UK, but not the same applies in the Netherlands, so it might be that they don't necessary trust that you've done whatever you're claiming you did over in Holland...

    So for my part, I would recommend doing most of your degree and internships in the UK as they're directly relevant (and understood) by British employers. A year abroad would be good though as it would give you more of an international insight which is recommended but not necessary.
    (Original post by candyaljamila)
    I've had foreign friends who were excellent in their mother tongue (duh!) and had IELTS/TOEFEL certificates proving their proficiency in English as well as doing a course in English and their mother tongue in their country. That still wasn't accepted as proof of being able to translate from one language to the other for British employers!

    Lots of them would rather take someone who's slightly less fluent but who's got UK recognised degrees like NVQs and community translation certificates than someone who's excellent because it's their mother tongue but has foreign degrees/experiences the employer isn't familiar with!

    It might also be that these employers simply prefer to employ British people rather than them having doubts about the qualifications. But thought I'd report what I've heard from personal experience and leave the OP and anyone else to come up with their own conclusions.
    ^^^this
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    (Original post by john2054)
    ^^^this
    Is rubbish.

    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    You bring up some points that are pretty deep and need to look into. My main plan is basically go to the Netherlands for my undergrad and then come back to England for my Masters and phD.

    And I am British btw. I just want to go abroad for uni.
    Speaking as an employer, there will be no issue for a British citizen getting a job in the UK with a Dutch degree.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    ^^^this
    Main differences is that her friends weren't British and did their degrees abroad. I'm British.


    Now can you please get off the thread? You've been incredibly patronising.
 
 
 
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