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    OH I almost forgot... because of the water, you are using every single muscle in your whole body... what's more during a waterpolo game you are constantaneously moving... hmm if you want an example of how exhausting it is.. try when you are in a swimming poole to get above the water untill you can see your swimsuit, when you've done this try to hold that position for about 5 sec... Off course without your feed touching the ground of the swimming poole... I wish everyone good luck cause I think only waterpolo'ers and a few exceptions can do it...
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    http://video.aol.com/video-detail/uf...herk/885524275 - Sean Sherk workouts/diet.

    /End plug.
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    5 kilometre sprinting
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    ice hockey! hockey, hockey hockey!!
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    no way dude.
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    If anyone has said Water Polo then they're right. I requires the highest level of athletic endurance and fitness when played at high levels.
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    Olympic wrestling
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    (Original post by Daxx)
    If anyone has said Water Polo then they're right. I requires the highest level of athletic endurance and fitness when played at high levels.
    proof
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    It's clearly rowing...
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    (Original post by Slick 'n' Shady)
    Before anyone makes any spontaneous comments look this up...

    F1 Racing.
    They're just sitting down for a few hours :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Caspiantiger)
    Olympic wrestling
    ...not a hope in hell. My knowledge of amateur wrestling is rather weak, but I think you'd find that MMA is more physically demanding, as are any sports that involve running around for long periods of time (e.g. rugby, football).

    (Original post by unikq)
    ice hockey! hockey, hockey hockey!!
    It's a very physical sport, but because the lines change so often, it's not that physically demanding, as the players regularly get breaks after taking a bit of a beating.


    When it comes to individual sports, it really has to be endurance races, ironman triathlons in particular. The amount of effort taken to win a race consisting of a 2.4 mile swim, 115 mile bike ride and 26.2 mile run is utterly immense, and they have to keep pushing on for 8+ hours.

    There's no question that things like boxing, wrestling, American football and so on are all physically demanding in one form or another (most notably being that they all involve you getting the **** beaten out of you :p:) but the ones I've listed there involve short bursts of energy being used up over a few minutes, or even seconds (in the case of American football :rolleyes:), then there's a pause in the action.

    I laughed my head off watching a clip of something from the NFL earlier this season...unsurprisingly, it's up on Youtube, so here you go:

    Sadly it doesn't quite show ALL of what happened, so I'll fill in the blanks. Kevin Williams ran ~85 yards with the ball to get a touchdown, only to discover that all his effort from that little sprint didn't count because a flag had been thrown back near where he'd gathered the ball. He collapsed in the touchdown area and the physio came running over with water to cool him down and a ****ing oxygen mask for him to breathe. He was then subbed out, sat on the bench and was given another tank of oxygen. Real showing of athleticism there :rofl:
    This guy is 27 (so it's not as if he's past his prime), could barely cope with running 80 metres in one go (taking into account that he did a TEENY bit of running before picking up the ball), and people here are saying it's a really physically demanding sport :toofunny:

    I realise he's a defensive tackle and not a wide receiver or something (a position that actually does involve a lot more running in addition to the rougher side the sport's known for), but that was ****ing hilarious when I first heard about that
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    (Original post by Dalimyr)
    I laughed my head off watching a clip of something from the NFL earlier this season...unsurprisingly, it's up on Youtube, so here you go:

    Sadly it doesn't quite show ALL of what happened, so I'll fill in the blanks. Kevin Williams ran ~85 yards with the ball to get a touchdown, only to discover that all his effort from that little sprint didn't count because a flag had been thrown back near where he'd gathered the ball. He collapsed in the touchdown area and the physio came running over with water to cool him down and a ****ing oxygen mask for him to breathe. He was then subbed out, sat on the bench and was given another tank of oxygen. Real showing of athleticism there :rofl:
    This guy is 27 (so it's not as if he's past his prime), could barely cope with running 80 metres in one go (taking into account that he did a TEENY bit of running before picking up the ball), and people here are saying it's a really physically demanding sport :toofunny:

    I realise he's a defensive tackle and not a wide receiver or something (a position that actually does involve a lot more running in addition to the rougher side the sport's known for), but that was ****ing hilarious when I first heard about that
    A lot of American footballers are trained on muscle endurance and combining speed, balance and sheer strength, not cardio.
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    Box Lacrosse is really physical.. more than field lacrosse i reckon... it's damn fast and dynamic without many breaks and a lot of physical punishment is dealt (you wouldnt survive without the padding) It's more intense than ice-hockey, that's for sure.. !
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    They're just sitting down for a few hours :rolleyes:
    More than any other sport F1 has the most combination of mental and physical concentration.

    Just sitting down right?
    Reactions must be pinpoint - to the milli second.
    There are no second chances, one mistake and your off the track - possibly to your death.
    The compartment that holds the driver can reach very, very high temperatures - only adding to the physical and mental test of endurance.

    In the run up to races drivers are't just 'driving' instead their in the gym, at the running track and in the theory room. Victory is dependent on them being on their very best on race day, mentally and physically.

    In short try to picture your self in an F1 car after 1hr 20 min of intense driving. Let alone for some of the hours they have to endure on longer tracks.
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    (Original post by Slick 'n' Shady)
    More than any other sport F1 has the most combination of mental and physical concentration.

    Just sitting down right?
    Reactions must be pinpoint - to the milli second.
    There are no second chances, one mistake and your off the track - possibly to your death.
    The compartment that holds the driver can reach very, very high temperatures - only adding to the physical and mental test of endurance.

    In the run up to races drivers are't just 'driving' instead their in the gym, at the running track and in the theory room. Victory is dependent on them being on their very best on race day, mentally and physically.

    In short try to picture your self in an F1 car after 1hr 20 min of intense driving. Let alone for some of the hours they have to endure on longer tracks.
    you have a good command of literature but that still doesn't convince me
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    (Original post by ForeverIsMyName)
    A lot of American footballers are trained on muscle endurance and combining speed, balance and sheer strength, not cardio.
    True, but is that really important? Any child is capable of running 80 metres without needing a tank of oxygen afterwards, let alone two. Williams is a professional athlete in the prime of life; he shouldn't be struggling that much with such a simple task, whether he does cardio training or not.
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    (Original post by Phnuggle)
    I've played most sports at some point, and i have to say Ice Hockey was definitely the most physically and mentally demanding. You have to use every single muscle in your body when you're playing, and have to think and make deicisions in split-seconds. I'd say American Football hurts the most IMO. And for all the people who are putting the NFL down because of the pads, you try playing it. It hurts with pads on, and people used to die in the game, that's why the pads are there.
    I hate getting into jousts like this because there is a serious misunderstanding on why the players wear pads, and as Phnuggle said - you wont understand till you try it yourself. The ruling for pads came into effect when in 1905 alone there were 18 deaths, which made then President, Teddy Roosevelt, threaten to ban the game. This in turn resulted in a change of rules (no longer a scrum, but a line of scimmage with a pause to reset the ball in between plays), as well as the utilization of protective gear.

    However, as the game has become more complex so has the protective gear, which now allows players to torpedo their bodies into their opponents. Check out this article from Popular Mechanics: The Anatomy of a Hit

    Because the padding enables a player to launch their body completely into another player with little fear, a 5'11", 199 lb DB who can run a 4.56 40 can produce up to 1600 lbs of tackling force. If that isn't eye popping, look at the G-Forces discussed in the article. The researchers quoted said that they have recorded serveral football hits that are over 150 G's.

    This is a great vid on hard hits as well:


    Every sport requires different training levels, and there are multiple performance variables: Strength, Power, Speed, Agility, Flexibility, Reaction Time, etc... so there will never be a way to truly say what is the "most" for anything since athletes need to specialize for their given sport. In Rugby more emphasis is put on a cardiovascular component, in football more is put on strength and explosiveness since the average play lasts less than 5 seconds. Does that make one better than the other? It's hard to keep going constantly for 90 minutes, but it's just as hard to go at your max for 5 seconds repeatedly ... just listen to how winded a sprinter is after a 100m dash.
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    (Original post by Slick 'n' Shady)
    More than any other sport F1 has the most combination of mental and physical concentration.

    Just sitting down right?
    Reactions must be pinpoint - to the milli second.
    There are no second chances, one mistake and your off the track - possibly to your death.
    The compartment that holds the driver can reach very, very high temperatures - only adding to the physical and mental test of endurance.

    In the run up to races drivers are't just 'driving' instead their in the gym, at the running track and in the theory room. Victory is dependent on them being on their very best on race day, mentally and physically.

    In short try to picture your self in an F1 car after 1hr 20 min of intense driving. Let alone for some of the hours they have to endure on longer tracks.
    i was being sarcastic, i didn't need the demands explained to me
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    They're just sitting down for a few hours :rolleyes:
    During the last DTM (like BTCC) event, they had a guy cabled and he had a pulse around 180 through the entire race.
    Schumacher said, that now that he's retired and not that fit anymore he'd be completely wasted after a normal trainingsession in the car while he could still play football afterwards when he was fit (and we're not talking about a race here)
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    (Original post by <CJ>)

    If American football was to loose the padding and helmets (don't see why not?)

    Because when that happens people die.
 
 
 
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