Why CAN'T you apply to both Oxford and Cambridge? Watch

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nexttime
  • Volunteer Team
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#101
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#101
(Original post by Bezzler)
I can't see the difference
(Original post by me)
EDIT: this seems to be specific to medicine
I'm surprised they bothered asking you your subject - they would just get a rehearsed answer that may or may not be (but probably is) utter bull. Hence why our tutors don't ask it.
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Bezzler
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#102
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#102
(Original post by nexttime)
I'm surprised they bothered asking you your subject - they would just get a rehearsed answer that may or may not be (but probably is) utter bull. Hence why our tutors don't ask it.
Oh right, I see.

And I got asked more specifically why I thought it was a good combination, I suppose. It was in my general modern language interview (neither of the tutors spoke German :p:) and I think they didn't have all that much to ask me...
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Eva2
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#103
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#103
(Original post by hobnob)
This is the old thread, clever clogs.:rolleyes:
oh, right....well, I knew that! :p:
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Carter.
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#104
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#104
The Competition & Rivalry Between The Two
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xinolisss
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#105
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#105
What if you didn't apply to both Oxford and Cambridge?
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Ben77mc
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#106
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#106
(Original post by im so academic)
Because of the ******* at UCAS.

Yet, choral people or whatever are exempt! That's discrimination if you can't play the piano!

Gosh... so unfair.

/rant

Anyways, I think it's due to the fact that there's a fairer chance of people getting in or something, or to control applications of some sort.
It's organ scholars
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keepa7
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#107
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#107
I dunno if this has been asked but can you apply to both for different courses. Also can you apply to either university twice (for different courses obviously)
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hey guysch im kl
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#108
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#108
(Original post by Eva2)
I understand where you're coming from, but it's no use getting shirty with people that are genuinely trying to help.
If you send an open application, why would they ask you why you want to go to a certain college in an interview? If what you said is true, they know that you haven't made the choice.
What? I never said anything about them knowing or not knowing about you making that choice. All the literature from Cambridge at least (thats where I applied) says that colleges do NOT know whether you made an open application. Hence, if they ask one person why they applied to the college presumably they'd ask everyone, so they would ask people who made open apps why they applied to the college.
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hey guysch im kl
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#109
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#109
(Original post by keepa7)
I dunno if this has been asked but can you apply to both for different courses. Also can you apply to either university twice (for different courses obviously)
You can't apply to both for different courses.
I'm not sure whether you can apply to either uni twice, I don't suppose so.
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Bezzler
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#110
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#110
(Original post by keepa7)
I dunno if this has been asked but can you apply to both for different courses. Also can you apply to either university twice (for different courses obviously)
Definitely no to the first one, you can only apply to one or the other (in one year - you can apply to one in one year then the other in the next)

Applying to one for two different courses would be idiotic. I don't know of anything in the system stopping you, but it would mess up interviews (especially at Oxford where you need to stay at the college for several nights - would you apply to the same college or a different one?!) and it would show a lack of commitment to your course. So in effect, no you can't.
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Audrey Hepburn
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#111
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#111
(Original post by nexttime)
I'm surprised they bothered asking you your subject - they would just get a rehearsed answer that may or may not be (but probably is) utter bull. Hence why our tutors don't ask it.
I got asked why my subject too, unfortunately I'd thought they'd never bother to ask that and so hadn't bothered to prepare an answer to it...

I think my off the cuff response of: 'because I hate everything else' did the trick though :cool:
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ily_em
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#112
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#112
(Original post by Galatea)
tbh I doubt the reason has anything to do with the benefits for the applicants... in the US you can apply to any number of schools and combinations as you want I think.
In the US though once you're accepted you're accepted, you don't have to wait for grades etc or have insurance/ firm. Maybe that's something to do with it?

Also in the US there are no two "top" universities, are there? Though you could argue that's the case here, it's just that Oxford and Cambridge are seen as THE top. hmm
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hey guysch im kl
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#113
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#113
(Original post by ily_em)
In the US though once you're accepted you're accepted, you don't have to wait for grades etc or have insurance/ firm. Maybe that's something to do with it?

Also in the US there are no two "top" universities, are there? Though you could argue that's the case here, it's just that Oxford and Cambridge are seen as THE top. hmm
What a terrible argument. The US's population is 5 times that of the UK. Hence, to (roughly) say that the top US schools have the same pressure as Oxbridge, you would say that there are ten "top" unis. You could probably say Ivy Leage plus MIT, Stanford, Berkeley, poss. Caltech and Duke.

Also you are completely contradicted by the fact that 7% of applicants to Harvard college are successful, compared to around 25% across Oxbridge.
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keepa7
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#114
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#114
(Original post by Bezzler)
Definitely no to the first one, you can only apply to one or the other (in one year - you can apply to one in one year then the other in the next)

Applying to one for two different courses would be idiotic. I don't know of anything in the system stopping you, but it would mess up interviews (especially at Oxford where you need to stay at the college for several nights - would you apply to the same college or a different one?!) and it would show a lack of commitment to your course. So in effect, no you can't.
But for something like medicine you can only apply for 4 and you can apply for something else for your fifth choice and you won't be questioned about your commitment for medicine (that's why I asked if you can apply to one twice)
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0404343m
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#115
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#115
Didn't we answer this question further up the thread? What's everyone still arguing about? Oxford and Cambridge's official line on it a number of years ago was that they were already stretched in dealing with and interviewing applicants- to allow people to apply to both would double their pool of able students, make the sifting harder, and complicating the interview process. In effect, they'd have to at least double the interview numbers aswell, as there'd be a hell of a lot more people who were offered a place only to reject it than would normally be the case. One of them said this would be a burden they couldn't handle, it'd cost them much more money, and might eventually lead to them having to scrap interviews. This was argued from the point of being a 'bad' thing, as it'd perhaps lead to more of the best students missing out because they weren't given a chance to shine, and so on. Long story short, for whatever reason, the two of them are against it, and I don't see anyone being willing to force the issue. That's really all there is to it.
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Antimatter
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#116
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#116
(Original post by around)
Let's settle the question once and for all by asking Wolfram Alpha:

wait what is this
:love:

Also, how does UCAS know if you're an organ scholar? </random>
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ily_em
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#117
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#117
(Original post by hey guysch im kl)
What a terrible argument. The US's population is 5 times that of the UK. Hence, to (roughly) say that the top US schools have the same pressure as Oxbridge, you would say that there are ten "top" unis. You could probably say Ivy Leage plus MIT, Stanford, Berkeley, poss. Caltech and Duke.

Also you are completely contradicted by the fact that 7% of applicants to Harvard college are successful, compared to around 25% across Oxbridge.
OK sorry I see what you mean I was just throwing some ideas in.
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nexttime
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#118
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#118
(Original post by Bezzler)
Definitely no to the first one, you can only apply to one or the other (in one year - you can apply to one in one year then the other in the next)

Applying to one for two different courses would be idiotic. I don't know of anything in the system stopping you, but it would mess up interviews (especially at Oxford where you need to stay at the college for several nights - would you apply to the same college or a different one?!) and it would show a lack of commitment to your course. So in effect, no you can't.
I'm pretty sure you can't - whatever in the system stops you applying to ox and cam applies to this scenario as well (except for postgraduate degrees). I do, however, know someone who applied to 4 different UCL courses and got into at least one .
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Unbounded
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#119
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#119
Well they interview around 10,000 applicants each year, maybe, right? They seem to pretty much squeeze that in, so interviewing 20,000 applicants would be even tougher.

I tink organ scholars, or choral scholars, can apply to both though.
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RightSaidJames
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#120
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#120
The reason is this:

Both Cambridge and Oxford give individual, in-depth interviews for every subject, and a high proportion of people who apply will get an interview if they meet basic grade requirements. This requires a tremendous amount of resources. If people could apply to both, almost everyone would. Hence, both universities wouldn't be able to interview such high proportions of applicants. Furthermore, under the current system very few succesful Oxbridge applicants will reject their offer, but if they got offers from both then they'd have to reject one if the offers were exactly the same. Thus, the Oxbridge colleges wouldn't be able to interview as many people (proportionally), and more of them would reject their offers, further wasting their resources.

In other words, the unique interview-based Oxbridge system depends on people not being allowed to apply to both. Since the system is unique, it is fair for them to have this exception. If they didn't have this exception they'd either have to spend twice as much money or abandon their application system because it no longer worked.

Regarding organ scholars, there is a lack of them and many colleges need one to be able to conduct church services and concerts, hence why this incentive is given.
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