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What specifically do TSR Tories want a future Conservative government to do? watch

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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Incidently I think quite a few people are making the same mistake with their expectations of the Tories ranging from old school conservatism to outright libertarianism.
    This is what I was wondering if the thread would reveal and I'd agree with your assessment. Part of this is to do with unrealistic youthful enthusiasm for what a not-Labour party might do in power, but I think a bigger part is the absence of any clear ideological grounding that the current Tories have to stand on and thus project themselves from. It's a situation that Labour have been in themselves for some time, of course, hence their own struggle to offer a 'big' or consistent message.
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    (Original post by AnythingButChardonnay)
    The left's idea of fairness being to send all children to the same, often bad, schools. At least parents have choice in Sweden. Social cohesion is not the job of a government.

    Surely, then, you support grammar schools?
    I would have thought that social cohesion was a pretty major part of governing a country, to be honest.
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    (Original post by CHAMON)
    No it's not. Labour have failed in my eyes. I liked Brown, but even I've just gone off him. I can't defend him anymore. It's fail after fail after fail. So comparing it to hilary supporters voting republican is a load of tosh! :rolleyes:
    And? theres better alternatives to labou than voting tory....
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    "What specifically do TSR Tories want a future Conservative government to do?"

    a big sig on the forums which take up half a page
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    I'm expecting very little to be honest. A few tweaks here and there, scratching at the edges. Attempts to get rid of bureaucracy, attempts at efficiency. Think they'll be a bit like Boris, no real reason to gain power, no real ideological cause to fight. Left with directionless day to day governing. They'll introduce a few new initiatives, fiddle with but not cut tax. I don't think Cameron will last too long either. My guess anyway.
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    This is what I was wondering if the thread would reveal and I'd agree with your assessment. Part of this is to do with unrealistic youthful enthusiasm for what a not-Labour party might do in power, but I think a bigger part is the absence of any clear ideological grounding that the current Tories have to stand on and thus project themselves from. It's a situation that Labour have been in themselves for some time, of course, hence their own struggle to offer a 'big' or consistent message.
    But what do you mean by 'clear'? Clear in order to reveal what? Clear so that you can say the Tories have no credible policies? Wouldn't that be somehwhat subjective then?

    Moreover, I don't think anyone here has really been enthusiastic as such. We have done what you asked us to do. This being to lay out what we hope a Conservative government might do. I don't think anyone has done this with the rashness that your 'unrealistic youthful enthusiasm' would imply.

    However, I think you have a grain of truth in your observation. How can you have a clear ideological grounding if the party you are canvassing for, as it were, constantly changes its own grounding? Point is, in any party, without a higher reference to judge policies on- an extrahuman one for example, then of course no one will agree on an ideological framework, because DIY ideology is flimsy and liable to break at any point of difficulty or stress.

    So, I think individuals may believe they have a firm ideological grounding, but I think some may be misled in considering the solidity of such a grounding because when tough times come along, they are liable to chop and change according to what might suit a new, reformed, DIY faith.

    Therefore, I think this excercise is really futile other than that it is an exposition of many people's own ideas about how to run the country. Suggesting that they come under an umbrella organisation of similar beliefs is rubbish because no umbrella organisation, if it's not regulated by an extrahuman framework, can remain constant in its ideaology.

    So, of course, you are unlikely to find a clear ideological groundwork when you are looking for it in the wrong places. Even in times of apparently tough ideology in political parties, this has usually been the brainchild of individuals, or a few.

    In conclusion therefore, political parties can, in their present state, only try in vain to come up with some common grounding between vastly different spectrums of broad ideology (right and left wing in a manner of speaking), and in the meantime, there will continue to be an absence of clear ideological groundwork- and people will continue to be frustrated, and governments will continue to fail.
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    (Original post by Jaager)
    And? theres better alternatives to labou than voting tory....
    Enlighten me?
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    This is what I was wondering if the thread would reveal and I'd agree with your assessment. Part of this is to do with unrealistic youthful enthusiasm for what a not-Labour party might do in power, but I think a bigger part is the absence of any clear ideological grounding that the current Tories have to stand on and thus project themselves from. It's a situation that Labour have been in themselves for some time, of course, hence their own struggle to offer a 'big' or consistent message.
    Indeed. Actually here's a pop quiz for anyone on this thread - Can anyone give a brief summary of the Cameron policy towards education/health/energy etc without checking the Conservative website. No doubt some of the more knowledgeable will but I'm willing to bet most people will be somewhat wide of the mark and perhaps a little disappointed (both the social cons and the libertarians)
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    (Original post by jonathan122)
    without leaving the EU, which Cameron has ruled out.
    Actually the way things are heading for now I would not be surprised if they actually did come to head on clash with the EU.

    -They will (or so they say) call a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty has it not been imposed when they take office.
    -They want to claw back the social chapter from the EU.
    -They state in several previous papers that they 'want to be in Europe but not governed by Europe'.

    1. If the Lisbon treaty is rejected which it most certainly will be then that will put the UK's membership of the EU in serious question. Furthermore Cameron and co. have already said that they want to renegotiate Britain's membership as it stands. On top of all of this the two most senior Tories after Cameron are Eurosceptics something which does not bode well for the future of the whole British adventure into the EU.

    2. If they were to actually do this that would require the consent of the other 26 nations something which will never happen. Basically that means that Britain is denied an area of sovereignty and very bluntly as well by the EU. That will not go down well with the electorate. If they are denied, which they will be, the already eurosceptic Tories will go back to drawing table and who knows what they will come up with.

    3. They want to be in it but not governed by it a point which is clearly taken by the population at large as well. Most people want to either leave the EU or just remain part of the EEC. See http://www.yougov.com/uk/archives/pd...7-Jun-2008.pdf
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    (Original post by mfm89)
    I'm expecting very little to be honest. A few tweaks here and there, scratching at the edges. Attempts to get rid of bureaucracy, attempts at efficiency. Think they'll be a bit like Boris, no real reason to gain power, no real ideological cause to fight. Left with directionless day to day governing. They'll introduce a few new initiatives, fiddle with but not cut tax. I don't think Cameron will last too long either. My guess anyway.
    I would agree with this analysis.

    It's a shame the Tories didn't hold their nerve. This has been a lost labour election, not a won conservative one. By opting for Cameron they surrendered what little was left of their ideology, perhaps permanently, in exchange for nothing much.
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    (Original post by Tory Dan)
    Cut taxes, tougher criminal justice, arm the police, bring back capital punishment, national service, abolish NHS, kill the poor, etc.
    Are any of these actually Conservative policy?
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Are any of these actually Conservative policy?
    They will be one day when the New Right returns once again.
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    (Original post by C2H5OH)
    What, and have to put up with 10 million ad breaks in every programme like the Americans do?

    No thanks...
    So you want ME to pay for YOU to not have adverts ... selfish much?
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    (Original post by Tory Dan)
    They will be one day when the New Right returns once again.
    Abolish the NHS... confounded and dumbstruck are notions which are blazing my state of mind.

    QUOI?
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    Ok, but these look like negative reasons for voting Tory - I'm interested in what people specifically want the Tories to do.
    Their are no positive reasons to vote Tory, people are just anoyed with BlueLabour. Noone knows what the Torys policys are because they can't publish them for fear of Labour steling them.

    People don't seem to have worked out that Labour and the Cons are esensaly the same party.
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    (Original post by Jaager)
    Thats almost as bad as hilary supporters voting republican because he didnt win...

    Personally i think labour will win the next election, but it will be on a small majority, then at the general election after that, then someone else might win...possibly the tories, but we dont really want to see that...

    as for Policies, i dunno, Bring back the death Penalty? :p:
    HAHAHAHAHA

    Yes, Labour will win the next election, you keep thinking that
 
 
 
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