Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Official Vacation Scheme Thread 2015!!! Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you so much J-SP for all of your input. I have been thinking about something for a while and I think I should ask- is there a certain way we should speak to lawyers/ graduate recruiters in law firms? For instance, in investment banks, there are not so many formalities in the way I would write an email or interact with senior employees but I feel that law firms and the legal industry in general is so much more traditional and has some secret codes (or maybe it's just me?).

    Also, in terms of dressing, I think in the US they are quite strict with the fact that you should wear a skirt. Is it the same over here? Or can I wear a dress (long- up to my knees) and a blazer on top?

    thank you!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J-SP)
    I've lost count I have had people be unable to answer a question. It isn't necessarily a deal breaker.

    If your struggling to think there and then, ask for some time to think about that. You can do the trick of "that's a good/tough question, can I pause to think about that for a moment" type response.

    As long as you are not sat there in silence for too long (ie over 30 seconds), it will give you time to think.

    There is nothing wrong with doing that, in fact most interviewers will be impressed by your common sense to think about it before rushing in and spouting incoherent ramblings.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Great - thank you
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roro123)
    Thank you so much J-SP for all of your input. I have been thinking about something for a while and I think I should ask- is there a certain way we should speak to lawyers/ graduate recruiters in law firms? For instance, in investment banks, there are not so many formalities in the way I would write an email or interact with senior employees but I feel that law firms and the legal industry in general is so much more traditional and has some secret codes (or maybe it's just me?).

    Also, in terms of dressing, I think in the US they are quite strict with the fact that you should wear a skirt. Is it the same over here? Or can I wear a dress (long- up to my knees) and a blazer on top?

    thank you!
    Really? I was planning on wearing a trouser suit, perhaps I should reconsider that for the US firms I've applied to at least :erm:
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roro123)
    Thank you so much J-SP for all of your input. I have been thinking about something for a while and I think I should ask- is there a certain way we should speak to lawyers/ graduate recruiters in law firms? For instance, in investment banks, there are not so many formalities in the way I would write an email or interact with senior employees but I feel that law firms and the legal industry in general is so much more traditional and has some secret codes (or maybe it's just me?).

    Also, in terms of dressing, I think in the US they are quite strict with the fact that you should wear a skirt. Is it the same over here? Or can I wear a dress (long- up to my knees) and a blazer on top?

    thank you!
    No worries on the input. That's what I am here for.

    I can't say there's any formalities as such or any "code" - if so I was completely naive to it for far too many years of working in recruitment.

    The main thing about correspondence is making sure it isn't overly lazy. They won't get too fussy with formal "Mrs" or "Dear" but it will drive them slightly mad if your email reads like a text message. With introductions (e.g. dear vs Hi) take their lead and follow suit, if you are emailing them first go with Dear Joe or Dear Graduate Recruitment rather than "Dear Mrs Recruiter" or "Dear Madam", although to be fair it doesn't really matter.

    Make sure you sign off your email appropriately (e.g. With your full name) and if you have attached any documents, make sure they are appropriately named and are not just "attachement" or "doc 1".

    In terms of what to wear, this has changed considerably even in recent years. A dress and jacket as you have described is fine unless it is too short or showing too much cleavage. You don't have to wear a skirt with matching blazer/jacket and you don't have to wear trousers. Just wear something smart/professional that you feel comfortable in. Only time I have questioned someone's choice of attire when wearing a dress was when they were wearing a bodycon dress that left little to the imagination with a very short and tailored jacket on top. If you look like you are working as a hostess in a nightclub then think again.... But your appearance is much more about being clean, tidy and smart rather than the specifics of what type of attire you are wearing.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChoccyWoccy)
    Really? I was planning on wearing a trouser suit, perhaps I should reconsider that for the US firms I've applied to at least :erm:
    Really wouldn't worry about it - I doubt they will notice.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roro123)
    Thank you so much J-SP for all of your input. I have been thinking about something for a while and I think I should ask- is there a certain way we should speak to lawyers/ graduate recruiters in law firms? For instance, in investment banks, there are not so many formalities in the way I would write an email or interact with senior employees but I feel that law firms and the legal industry in general is so much more traditional and has some secret codes (or maybe it's just me?).

    Also, in terms of dressing, I think in the US they are quite strict with the fact that you should wear a skirt. Is it the same over here? Or can I wear a dress (long- up to my knees) and a blazer on top?

    thank you!

    (Original post by ChoccyWoccy)
    Really? I was planning on wearing a trouser suit, perhaps I should reconsider that for the US firms I've applied to at least :erm:
    At the firm I worked at we had around 70 trainees and there was a variety between skirts, dresses which came down to around knee level and trousers - I really don't think it matters. If anything though, skirts with a smart blouse were most commonly worn.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J-SP)
    No worries on the input. That's what I am here for.

    I can't say there's any formalities as such or any "code" - if so I was completely naive to it for far too many years of working in recruitment.

    The main thing about correspondence is making sure it isn't overly lazy. They won't get too fussy with formal "Mrs" or "Dear" but it will drive them slightly mad if your email reads like a text message. With introductions (e.g. dear vs Hi) take their lead and follow suit, if you are emailing them first go with Dear Joe or Dear Graduate Recruitment rather than "Dear Mrs Recruiter" or "Dear Madam", although to be fair it doesn't really matter.

    Make sure you sign off your email appropriately (e.g. With your full name) and if you have attached any documents, make sure they are appropriately named and are not just "attachement" or "doc 1".

    In terms of what to wear, this has changed considerably even in recent years. A dress and jacket as you have described is fine unless it is too short or showing too much cleavage. You don't have to wear a skirt with matching blazer/jacket and you don't have to wear trousers. Just wear something smart/professional that you feel comfortable in. Only time I have questioned someone's choice of attire when wearing a dress was when they were wearing a bodycon dress that left little to the imagination with a very short and tailored jacket on top. If you look like you are working as a hostess in a nightclub then think again.... But your appearance is much more about being clean, tidy and smart rather than the specifics of what type of attire you are wearing.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you! definitely short skirts/ dresses can be very inappropriate! Thanks a lot! Have a nice evening!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J-SP)
    No worries on the input. That's what I am here for.

    The main thing about correspondence is making sure it isn't overly lazy. They won't get too fussy with formal "Mrs" or "Dear" but it will drive them slightly mad if your email reads like a text message. With introductions (e.g. dear vs Hi) take their lead and follow suit, if you are emailing them first go with Dear Joe or Dear Graduate Recruitment rather than "Dear Mrs Recruiter" or "Dear Madam", although to be fair it doesn't really matter.

    Make sure you sign off your email appropriately (e.g. With your full name) and if you have attached any documents, make sure they are appropriately named and are not just "attachement" or "doc 1".

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    If you are emailing to register to attend an event at a law firm, is it ok to simply write "Dear Ms X, I would like to register for the [X event] on [X date]. Please do not hesitate to contact me...etc... and I look forward to hearing from you. Kind regards, [My name]"

    The reason I ask is that when you click on the link to "join the event" it automatically starts an email for you with the subject "I'd like to register for the...". Or is it better to give a bit of intro like "I am a recent graduate interested in applying to your firm for a vacation scheme and training contract. As such, I would like to register to attend...."

    Thank you
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hey did anyone give the KWM video interview!? Looks intimidating :/
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TrainingChopeful)
    If you are emailing to register to attend an event at a law firm, is it ok to simply write "Dear Ms X, I would like to register for the [X event] on [X date]. Please do not hesitate to contact me...etc... and I look forward to hearing from you. Kind regards, [My name]"

    The reason I ask is that when you click on the link to "join the event" it automatically starts an email for you with the subject "I'd like to register for the...". Or is it better to give a bit of intro like "I am a recent graduate interested in applying to your firm for a vacation scheme and training contract. As such, I would like to register to attend...."

    Thank you
    If it's just to register for an event and they are partly writing the response for you, I really wouldn't worry about it.

    Just make sure it's appropriately signed off with your full name.

    Only put in extra information if they have requested it.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J-SP)
    If it's just to register for an event and they are partly writing the response for you, I really wouldn't worry about it.

    Just make sure it's appropriately signed off with your full name.

    Only put in extra information if they have requested it.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's really helpful. Thank you!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trisha.b)
    Hey did anyone give the KWM video interview!? Looks intimidating :/
    Doesn't seem too bad from the description, seems to have a 'personal' slant to it. I'm intrigued to know whether everyone got the invite.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by liarpoker)
    Doesn't seem too bad from the description, seems to have a 'personal' slant to it. I'm intrigued to know whether everyone got the invite.
    haha no no. everyone didn't. About 25-30% got the invite I assume. And around 10% will get invited to the AC. don't worry :P
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone else feel like the 31st deadline has come around way too quick? Still have a number of applications to do and feeling the pressure majorly!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TrainingChopeful)
    Does anyone else feel like the 31st deadline has come around way too quick? Still have a number of applications to do and feeling the pressure majorly!
    Definitely, it's especially challenging balancing preparation for applications with exam revision and assignments.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    "Describe a challenge you may face as a Trainee solicitor and detail how you would respond as an individual."

    How would one approach this question? Would you say it relates more to the obstacles facing the legal industry at large, or a more personal challenge such as being faced with a difficult client?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I received an email from Simmons & Simmons on the 23rd December saying that I had a AC, and they would get in touch in the New Year to confirm a date. However, I haven't heard from them since. Has anyone heard from them about a AC date, and do you think it's worth emailing them?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chianti1)
    Definitely, it's especially challenging balancing preparation for applications with exam revision and assignments.
    I know what you mean! I'm a graduate but I'm working/ taking part in work experience at firms and find it difficult to find enough time to really sit down and complete a form.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    An application I'm filling in has various Qs like non-academic achievements and what will the firm need to do to stay competitive. Then there is a Q about which location do you want to train at and when do you intend to start your TC. Both Qs allow 250 words for each but I'm not sure whether I need to fill the entire word count/how many words would be appropriate. I'm also not sure what stuff I would need to include - is it enough to just say I have family in the area, am looking to relocate and applying/interviewing for roles in the area. Also for when do you intend to start your TC, I stated the 2017 date and what I intend to do in the time before starting a TC but also have included that I would be able to start earlier should the opportunity arise.

    Would appreciate any views - as both word counts so far are very small (around 100)
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pasdesdeux)
    "Describe a challenge you may face as a Trainee solicitor and detail how you would respond as an individual."

    How would one approach this question? Would you say it relates more to the obstacles facing the legal industry at large, or a more personal challenge such as being faced with a difficult client?

    My instinct would be the latter!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.