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Law Offers for 2016? watch

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    Don't forget that the overall population covers classics, ancient Greek, Chinese studies, chemistry, medicine, aero space studies, metallurgy, dentistry, Japanese art ... and many other subjects. As much as I want an offer from LSE law school, the fact remains, LSE is not a comprehensive university.


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    If you are talking about a trainee contract with a Jurist Doctor, glaring CPE etc. I will shut up and disappear (they are exceptions, not norms). But, how many do you think get into the Magic Circle with something else but LLB, BA (Juris)?


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    Likewise, if you insist on arguing that a significant no of Math and history degree holders (as opposed to to LLB holders from say Bristol and Nottingham) manage to get trainee contracts with major London law firms, I'll shut up and disappear from this thread. I know my weakness; I'm not good at arguing against statistics and facts.


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    (Original post by leehoma)
    Don't forget that the overall population covers classics, ancient Greek, Chinese studies, chemistry, medicine, aero space studies, metallurgy, dentistry, Japanese art ... and many other subjects. As much as I want an offer from LSE law school, the fact remains, LSE is not a comprehensive university.

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    I mean the overall population at LSE specifically, which covers mathematics, economics, history and whatever else they cover.

    (Original post by leehoma)
    If you are talking about a trainee contract with a Jurist Doctor, glaring CPE etc. I will shut up and disappear (they are exceptions, not norms). But, how many do you think get into the Magic Circle with something else but LLB, BA (Juris)?


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    Not referring to those at all. All major firms claim that around 50% of their TCs go to non-law students, on the basis of diversity.

    Linklaters: "Many people are still surprised that you can train as a lawyer without completing an undergraduate Law degree. In fact, almost half of our trainees have studied something other than Law."

    http://www.linklatersgraduates.co.uk...ning-contracts

    (Original post by leehoma)
    Likewise, if you insist on arguing that a significant no of Math and history degree holders (as opposed to to LLB holders from say Bristol and Nottingham) manage to get trainee contracts with major London law firms, I'll shut up and disappear from this thread. I know my weakness; I'm not good at arguing against statistics and facts.


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    I think you've misunderstood me: I'm not arguing about the law vs non law degrees at certain universities. The truth is that large firms will not care about your degree per se, regardless of whether you studied Mathematics at Bristol, History at LSE or Law at Nottingham (the degrees mentioned are random). The only difference is that they'll have to do the GDL as well.

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    I'm really grateful for your post (hand on my heart). But, doesn't it mean that none of Durham, LSE, KCL, QML, UCL, Bristol ... (and for that matter, Oxford and Cambridge) can claim an edge?


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    Honestly, Stefan, I'm beginning to love you.


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    (Original post by leehoma)
    I'm really grateful for your post (hand on my heart). But, doesn't it mean that none of Durham, LSE, KCL, QML, UCL, Bristol ... (and for that matter, Oxford and Cambridge) can claim an edge?


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    Not necessarily - the reputation of the university itself still counts and so Oxbridge, for instance, can certainly claim an edge. The difference is that the subject (ie whether you're studying Classics at Oxford or History at Cambridge) will not be treated as sub-par compared to Law at Oxford or Law at Cambridge. In the same way, you won't he disadvantaged if you're studying Maths at Durham against someone studying Law at Durham - firms will use the application form, the tests and the interviews to see who's worth it, not the subject.

    (Original post by leehoma)
    Honestly, Stefan, I'm beginning to love you.


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    Nice to know haha

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    PM me your final destination. If we end up in the same place, I'll buy you a drink or nice cup of coffee.


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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    Not necessarily - the reputation of the university itself still counts and so Oxbridge, for instance, can certainly claim an edge. The difference is that the subject (ie whether you're studying Classics at Oxford or History at Cambridge) will not be treated as sub-par compared to Law at Oxford or Law at Cambridge. In the same way, you won't he disadvantaged if you're studying Maths at Durham against someone studying Law at Durham - firms will use the application form, the tests and the interviews to see who's worth it, not the subject.
    I wonder if your point here is true. Generally, people who have the most success taking the GDL route (naturally) are Oxbridge grads. The number of non-Oxbridge grads who take the GDL route and take up a TC are significantly in the minority and I'd go as far as saying they are rare. Perhaps taking an LLB at a non-Oxbridge is better than taking a non-LLB at a non-Oxbridge.
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    (Original post by leehoma)
    PM me your final destination. If we end up in the same place, I'll buy you a drink or nice cup of coffee.


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    I'm already a first year at Bristol... That's very kind of you though

    (Original post by callum_law)
    I wonder if your point here is true. Generally, people who have the most success taking the GDL route (naturally) are Oxbridge grads. The number of non-Oxbridge grads who take the GDL route and take up a TC are significantly in the minority and I'd go as far as saying they are rare. Perhaps taking an LLB at a non-Oxbridge is better than taking a non-LLB at a non-Oxbridge.
    In all honesty, this a pretty obscure topic considering that massive lack of statistics. Nonetheless, firms have been making it clear that non-LLB students will not be at any disadvantage against LLB students, and there isn't any reason to doubt the validity of this.

    Obviously, firms have to consider the extra funding and time required for those studying non-LLB subjects, which may be slightly advantageous to LLB students at the lower end of the large firms, but that's inherent in the SRA requirements.

    The matter about Oxbridge/non Oxbridge rests entirely on the superb reputations of the universities, not the subject itself (or so I would think): Oxbridge sends more LLB students to the City than other universities as well.

    I would thus maintain that, particularly for MC and other large firms, the degree subject is not relevant. This is not impervious to criticism though.

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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    In all honesty, this a pretty obscure topic considering that massive lack of statistics. Nonetheless, firms have been making it clear that non-LLB students will not be at any disadvantage against LLB students, and there isn't any reason to doubt the validity of this.
    Exactly. The only thing which has really given me that impression is looking at LinkedIn profiles which is not really an exact science.

    Firms are very open about the halfy-half LLB:GDL ratio (and indeed sometimes it's 40:60 for GDLs), but that doesn't seem as inclusive in reality as they make it seem. As you note, funding can be an issue, but an issue overcome if one is applying for large firms which fund GDL/LPC.
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    What college did you get an offer from? Got accepted by Cambridge as well )
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    I've got my LNAT tomorrow and I'm scoring 18 in the practice paper multiple choice questions

    how ******* pathetic
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    (Original post by TopfahadHussein)
    I've got my LNAT tomorrow and I'm scoring 18 in the practice paper multiple choice questions

    how ******* pathetic
    All the best! Don't fret. You'll be fine
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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    I'm already a first year at Bristol... That's very kind of you though



    In all honesty, this a pretty obscure topic considering that massive lack of statistics. Nonetheless, firms have been making it clear that non-LLB students will not be at any disadvantage against LLB students, and there isn't any reason to doubt the validity of this.

    Obviously, firms have to consider the extra funding and time required for those studying non-LLB subjects, which may be slightly advantageous to LLB students at the lower end of the large firms, but that's inherent in the SRA requirements.

    The matter about Oxbridge/non Oxbridge rests entirely on the superb reputations of the universities, not the subject itself (or so I would think): Oxbridge sends more LLB students to the City than other universities as well.

    I would thus maintain that, particularly for MC and other large firms, the degree subject is not relevant. This is not impervious to criticism though.

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    What's Bristol (and law at bristol) like? And, like always, can I ask what you got at GCSE please


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    (Original post by oli19919)
    What's Bristol (and law at bristol) like? And, like always, can I ask what you got at GCSE please


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    It's been amazing. Very, very demanding but amazing! The tutors are very supportive and I'm having a blast with the course (makes you wonder at people who call it boring tbh).

    The only downsides are that the exam venue is pretty far away and cold (you're not allowed to wear jackets) and perhaps the structure of the university - lectures and tutorials are held all over the place and it does get somewhat tiresome.

    I didn't take GCSEs myself (not from the UK and didn't study at an international school).

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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    It's been amazing. Very, very demanding but amazing! The tutors are very supportive and I'm having a blast with the course (makes you wonder at people who call it boring tbh).

    The only downsides are that the exam venue is pretty far away and cold (you're not allowed to wear jackets) and perhaps the structure of the university - lectures and tutorials are held all over the place and it does get somewhat tiresome.

    I didn't take GCSEs myself (not from the UK and didn't study at an international school).

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    Thanks for the quick reply, how are you finding the accomodation? And I hate to ask this question but it's what I get asked all the time: 'Aren't you scared about how competitive it is to be a lawyer?'. I'd always thought it wouldn't be AS bad if you went to a great RG like Bristol?


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    Can we please stop with the whole argument and chummy stuff and get back to the actual point of this thread aka people who are actually trying to get into university, not those who are already there.....
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    Has anyone heard from durham?

    And would you pick durham or ucl if you hope to progress into advocacy or top law firms? I know they are both outstanding but what are all your personal opinions?
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    (Original post by elise1998)
    Has anyone heard from durham?

    And would you pick durham or ucl if you hope to progress into advocacy or top law firms? I know they are both outstanding but what are all your personal opinions?
    Tbh there isn't much difference imo between the two as far as prestige goes, it depends on which you prefer with regards to location and night life etc.

    If you are happy with paying much more for cost of living in London, I'd say UCL as big firms on doorstep.

    I guess it depends whether you prefer London/big city or more quiet, rural


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