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The Classics Society Mk II watch

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    (Original post by Sappho)
    Revised edition probably. The one from the sixties excluded them.
    Yeah, mine is an edition from 1973 so you're probably right :beard:
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    Yeah, mine is an edition from 1973 so you're probably right :beard:
    Your beard is irritating.
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    (Original post by Sappho)
    Your beard is irritating.
    I'm sorry :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    I'm sorry :getmecoat:


    It's best when conversations only consist of smileys anymore. That does work...
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    (Original post by Mushrooms)
    Are teacher never told us about that....
    We had 2 lectures on it. A stunned silence followed. In my lecturer's famous words, "He's taking the piss" out of a similar thing done for dead pets in Greek or something.

    It's been a while since I did the module, but good God, he's a rude one.
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    (Original post by Mushrooms)
    it was about steeling napkins!
    Ah I remember this one.
    A little gem, I thought: so short, but interesting and full notions which make you go off and investigate (e.g. why 'left hand', and why would anyone care about napkins :P), and mentions characters from some of his other poems too, which seems to make a lot of his emotions in poetry come together.

    Though I can understand why it could be seen as paling in comparison with some of the others :teeth:
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    I like the napkin character for the... Pettiness?... That it brings out in the Catullus character - he adds that the napkins were special gifts from beloved friends at the end, as if an afterthought. It shows how obsessed the character is with forcing the idea that he has urbanitas by pointing out how others lack it, some what of a Hyacinth Bucket character. However, in this poem, his very forcing of this idea through picking at small misjudgments of manner suggest that he is not urbane at all. Indeed, we only get that character's viewpoint.

    Yeah, I liked my Catullus module.
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    (Original post by Aemiliana)
    I like the napkin character for the... Pettiness?... That it brings out in the Catullus character - he adds that the napkins were special gifts from beloved friends at the end, as if an afterthought. It shows how obsessed the character is with forcing the idea that he has urbanitas by pointing out how others lack it, some what of a Hyacinth Bucket character. However, in this poem, his very forcing of this idea through picking at small misjudgments of manner suggest that he is not urbane at all. Indeed, we only get that character's viewpoint.

    Yeah, I liked my Catullus module.
    Being wrapped up in things that don't matter can be pretty hilarious in a comedy (EDIT: I'm not suggesting for one moment that this was meant to be overly comedic though!).
    I guess it's like being overly distracted by shiny things
    Though it really depends on the viewpoint you come at it from.
    It seems to me that it is quite natural to attach a lot of importance to these more symbolic things (like an heirloom, whose functionality is usually pretty much zilch), and that once an 'outsider' realises the significance that these things have for such a person, they too will think it's quite justifiable that the person feels this way - even though, when no explanation is given, getting defensive about some napkins might seem a bit weird.

    PS You might or might not have just made me watch loads of Keeping up Appearances on YouTube ... :p:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx9e5...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNFC_...eature=related
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    I had almost forgotten about this thread. In a couple of weeks I shall be beginning my module on Classical and Post-Classical Latin. Also stated my interest with my Ancient History department about their group where they meet once a fortnight to read a text in the original language and discuss it.
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    Feel like a love story? http://www.libraries.wvu.edu/news/20...are-book-room/

    :suith:

    edit: Here's a picture, too: http://www.epoc.de/sixcms/media.php/...pg.1143752.jpg
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    by any chance is anyone here an expert on ancient greek pottery, sculpture and architecture and would be in a place to help me, i cant get my head around this topic!
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    (Original post by cl_steele)
    by any chance is anyone here an expert on ancient greek pottery, sculpture and architecture and would be in a place to help me, i cant get my head around this topic!
    Maybe we're not experts on those topics but experts on finding decent books and/or webpages on topics. What's your problem/question and level of study?
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    Good A-Level choices for taking a classics degree?

    Spanish
    Classical Civ
    Economics
    History
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    (Original post by Tweaky)
    Good A-Level choices for taking a classics degree?

    Spanish
    Classical Civ
    Economics
    History
    Sounds good to me, but you might want to make sure your specifications for Spanish and Class Civ have a decent literature element to get the full skill set
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    Nah History will more than sort that out, as well Economics depending on which examination board he takes. Any combination of good strong subjects with at least one essay based one is fine.
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    Thanks guys - I was considering taking English Literature. However, It's not my strongest or my favorite subject and I also want to be able to read lots and lots of ancient history books, instead of ones specific for English. Is anyone taking classics here? And how enjoyable is it?
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    (Original post by Tweaky)
    Thanks guys - I was considering taking English Literature. However, It's not my strongest or my favorite subject and I also want to be able to read lots and lots of ancient history books, instead of ones specific for English. Is anyone taking classics here? And how enjoyable is it?
    Why don't you like Eng Lit? Because in classics modules you'll still have to analyse texts etc. Those that took English A level certainly found the poetry/drama modules easier than those (like me) who did't. Would you be doing the languages?
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    (Original post by Tweaky)
    Thanks guys - I was considering taking English Literature. However, It's not my strongest or my favorite subject and I also want to be able to read lots and lots of ancient history books, instead of ones specific for English. Is anyone taking classics here? And how enjoyable is it?
    As Aemiliana says, if you prefer ancient history to English, it would seem to make sense just to study [as a degree] ancient history, rather than learning languages and forcing yourself to study literature that doesn't really tickle your tastebuds. I studied classics (picking up both languages at university), and found it both enjoyable and infuriating in equal parts, but how you personally find it will, of course, be dependent on all kinds of things. It's easy to find out what kind of material you'd be expected to study on various courses though, so I'm sure you can have a skim through some of the books that you'd have to look at, and see what you think of them.
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    (Original post by Aemiliana)
    Why don't you like Eng Lit? Because in classics modules you'll still have to analyse texts etc. Those that took English A level certainly found the poetry/drama modules easier than those (like me) who did't. Would you be doing the languages?
    I don't not like it, It's just not one of my favorite subjects. I'd prefer to do history instead, thats all. And I really want to earn latin and greek.
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    (Original post by Tweaky)
    I don't not like it, It's just not one of my favorite subjects. I'd prefer to do history instead, thats all. And I really want to earn latin and greek.
    As jismith said, maybe consider ancient history instead of classics at uni then. Then you are 'highly advised' (a nice way of saying it's not compulsory but really beneficial and really ought to) study Latin and Greek an get to mainly focus on the history. Personally I love the ripping apart of texts (something that appeals to me in history too) and so I chose a uni where I could take loads of literature modules if I wanted to.
 
 
 
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