The Classics Society Mk II Watch

The Lyceum
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#1301
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#1301
(Original post by Aemiliana)
Thanks. I would write more but the wine is making me sleepy. I just want to be a better student to be honest, I'm, fed of procrastinating now. I'm fed up of hiding from my perfectionism., Says the girl drunk in a ****ing onesie in a messing room having not done he seminar work she said she would.
Wikipedia will tell me. I love Wikipedia, I revised solely from there for a modern history exam. Best student.
I know the feeling....don't worry about it. You stress more than any other Classics student I know. Which is saying something. You like your field (you have to really hate it at times to know you love it) and you work at it so don't worry. Hang in there Steffi.

EDIT: Damn can't rep you again. Will make a mental note. "Onesie" AWESOME. Every Classicist needs a special relaxing uniform I think!
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SirMasterKey
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#1302
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#1302
(Original post by Aemiliana)
Thanks. I would write more but the wine is making me sleepy. I just want to be a better student to be honest, I'm, fed of procrastinating now. I'm fed up of hiding from my perfectionism., Says the girl drunk in a ****ing onesie in a messing room having not done he seminar work she said she would.
Wikipedia will tell me. I love Wikipedia, I revised solely from there for a modern history exam. Best student.
I'm determined to do the same, mainly because of that fudging 2.ii in my Roman Imperialism essay and thus the module. In order to try and help I've elected to sit in the Roman Republic module and will go and use the library more often, sitting in there and working. Not leaving essays until the last minute.

Attempting to do one now on 20th Century New York, for Monday and not finished the reading but started the essay at least. Needs to be circa 4000 words though. :cry:
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SirMasterKey
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#1303
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#1303
Speaking of Classics I wonder if that fortnightly group of reading ancient sources is going to happen in my department. The exam period is over now so no reason not too start.
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Nox Aeterna
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#1304
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#1304
(Original post by Aemiliana)
I really ought to learn more archaeology. Can anyone recommend any sort of introductory books on ancient/general archaeology? I did take one highly interdisciplinary module last year. I wasn't a fan of it because I don't feel like I learnt much, just lots (as in, in being so interdisciplinary I did not gain much depth of knowledge and instead only a surface knowledge of each area). However, we got a trip to the museum to look at mummies as a seminar and my seminar leader gave us chocolate so I don't care.

Yes, I have been drinking, that is why I sound like a knob in this post. So sue me.
I'd second The Lyceum's suggestion of Renfrew(et Bahn) for a general introduction to Archaeology. Also you may want to look at Matthew Johnson's Archaeological Theory which you actually will find more useful having read renfrew and bahn. I'm pretty sure most archaeology modules in Manchester use those two books as general guides in Archaeology, and you may already know this but then again you are drunk and whatnot, but seriously they are really good and make most other comparable ones look mildly inferior.

This last page of conversation about MA's and funding is mildly depressing, then again I think a career development loan from the government is an option too, how easy that is to obtain, I don't know, but they do give up to £10,000 I think.
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*Corinna*
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#1305
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#1305
(Original post by Aemiliana)
Funding aside, how hard is it to get onto a MA course? Should Manchester wish to have me (hahaha), I could go part time and fund myself with my current job. Or, I have a relative who has already said that they'd like to fund me through more education which is incredibly lucky. Failing that, I have inheritance/savings which would cover fees and contribute a little to rent...
I don't think it's that hard to get onto an MA. Apart from Oxbridge, most unis are happy to take decent students, as not so many people apply.

As for the youtube link, I don't know, I don't think it's a rhythm that Catullus would have enjoyed.
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The Lyceum
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#1306
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#1306
(Original post by Nox Aeterna)
I'd second The Lyceum's suggestion of Renfrew(et Bahn) for a general introduction to Archaeology. Also you may want to look at Matthew Johnson's Archaeological Theory which you actually will find more useful having read renfrew and bahn. I'm pretty sure most archaeology modules in Manchester use those two books as general guides in Archaeology, and you may already know this but then again you are drunk and whatnot, but seriously they are really good and make most other comparable ones look mildly inferior.

This last page of conversation about MA's and funding is mildly depressing, then again I think a career development loan from the government is an option too, how easy that is to obtain, I don't know, but they do give up to £10,000 I think.
Aye, but please don't take this as my endorsement of Renfrew. His work on Bronze age cults is alright...his stuff on Indo-Europeans is so laughable and at best used for toilet paper.

Yes the funding situation sucks. But, if you look at it from a depts view, they have little reason to fund BA/MA study since, despite what a few students may think, we're pretty unimportant and quite often just get in the way of things. Most students opt for the CDL, yes. I suspect securing one will get harder in future, alas, but in general the requisites are don't get in debt (i.e fail to pay rent, over your overdraft etc) for two years prior to your applying and it should go fine.
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Aemiliana
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#1307
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#1307
I hate that the uni version of this forum is gone. :cry: It messes with my OCD need for everything to be in it's rightful place. Like ancient history has to stay in history! The shame!

Okay, I'm not that bothered, I'm just tired and over emotional and already behind with uni work.

Oh and I haven't gotten back to any of you... I'll try to tomorrow, I plan on collapsing into bed and crying for a few hours right now. Stressed!
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Aesc
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#1308
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#1308
Hey all,
Perhaps a bit of an out-there question, but which countries are notable for their study of the classics? Perhaps more specifically (by means of explanation), if I was given a theoretical library with ever book on the classics ever, and an infinite amount of time to read, roughly speaking which languages would I use most?
Realise this isn't very clear, if necessary I'll edit to simplify but for the moment I'd like to see what response I get without having to reveal my motivations (and thus influence your answers)
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The Lyceum
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#1309
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#1309
(Original post by Aesc)
Hey all,
Perhaps a bit of an out-there question, but which countries are notable for their study of the classics? Perhaps more specifically (by means of explanation), if I was given a theoretical library with ever book on the classics ever, and an infinite amount of time to read, roughly speaking which languages would I use most?
Realise this isn't very clear, if necessary I'll edit to simplify but for the moment I'd like to see what response I get without having to reveal my motivations (and thus influence your answers)
Well nowadays English is ridiculously dominant, I mean..it's hard to actually emphasise that enough whereas just a few decades ago it was almost the opposite case. That being said Classics is hardly a monolingual subject, though different areas require different languages to varying degrees.

Good luck doing Homer without German, Hellenistic poetry without Italian, anything seriously philological without French etc etc...

Basically, though English is important there's a reason why we all learn French, German and often Italian in the Classics. Though what order one does is dependant on area of specialism.
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Aesc
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#1310
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#1310
(Original post by The Lyceum)
Well nowadays English is ridiculously dominant, I mean..it's hard to actually emphasise that enough whereas just a few decades ago it was almost the opposite case. That being said Classics is hardly a monolingual subject, though different areas require different languages to varying degrees.

Good luck doing Homer without German, Hellenistic poetry without Italian, anything seriously philological without French etc etc...

Basically, though English is important there's a reason why we all learn French, German and often Italian in the Classics. Though what order one does is dependant on area of specialism.
Thanks, that's pretty much exactly what I was looking for. I was wondering if Russian might be useful but, other than perhaps for Byzantine history, I didn't really think it would be. I might be able to do a beginner's course in either German or Italian next year so I'll have that ticking over in the back of my mind for now
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The Lyceum
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#1311
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#1311
(Original post by Aesc)
Thanks, that's pretty much exactly what I was looking for. I was wondering if Russian might be useful but, other than perhaps for Byzantine history, I didn't really think it would be. I might be able to do a beginner's course in either German or Italian next year so I'll have that ticking over in the back of my mind for now
Russian really isn't that useful, even for Byzantine stuff. Most decent Russian scholars will publish in German or English. When I say decent I mean world class btw.

You could have just asked openly. I'd say out of German and Italian go for German. German is generally more useful (even if many scholars have their heads in the 19th/early 20th century and constantly will come across as idiotic...on the plus side, great for arguing against) across the board. Basically the only time you'd take Italian before German as a Classicist is if you've got a really specific reason. No, ladies don't count, sorry.
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Aemiliana
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#1312
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#1312
The fact that we have no uni level Classics forum means that potential fellow Classicists are being left out in the cold as 'normal' historians ignore them.

Also, wow I have a lot of work to do already. I may have put off work and read ancient Athenian law court speeches. That sort of counts, right? Well it was bloody interesting anyway.
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The Lyceum
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#1313
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#1313
(Original post by Aemiliana)
The fact that we have no uni level Classics forum means that potential fellow Classicists are being left out in the cold as 'normal' historians ignore them.

Also, wow I have a lot of work to do already. I may have put off work and read ancient Athenian law court speeches. That sort of counts, right? Well it was bloody interesting anyway.
Symptomatic of society at large I think.
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Aesc
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#1314
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#1314
(Original post by The Lyceum)
Russian really isn't that useful, even for Byzantine stuff. Most decent Russian scholars will publish in German or English. When I say decent I mean world class btw.

You could have just asked openly. I'd say out of German and Italian go for German. German is generally more useful (even if many scholars have their heads in the 19th/early 20th century and constantly will come across as idiotic...on the plus side, great for arguing against) across the board. Basically the only time you'd take Italian before German as a Classicist is if you've got a really specific reason. No, ladies don't count, sorry.
Thought as much, just that one of the strands I'm considering is the Diplomatic Service and Russian would be more useful there. That being said, they do on-the-job language training so I'm not fussed about doing a course at uni, just if it might be useful for Classics then it'd be something to consider. But like I say, didn't have much hope there :rolleyes:

I was thinking German too. Especially as I do French atm, I don't want to limit myself to just the Romance strand of IE. My reasoning for Italian was that it might be easier as my first evening language course - haven't got much experience of inflected language so far, although I've booked my place at JACT Wells - and if I wanted to go down the "archaelogy & art history" route by visiting Italy. However, this has made me think I might be able to wing it if I had to?:

(Original post by Wikipedia)
Italian derives diachronically from Latin. Unlike most other Romance languages, Italian retains Latin's contrast between short and long consonants. As in most Romance languages, stress is distinctive. In particular, among the Romance languages, Italian is the closest to Latin in terms of vocabulary.[7] Lexical similarity is 89% with French.
Although the similarity between French and Italian is about the same as that between chimps and humans, so obviously even a few percent can make a big difference
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The Lyceum
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#1315
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#1315
(Original post by Aesc)
Thought as much, just that one of the strands I'm considering is the Diplomatic Service and Russian would be more useful there. That being said, they do on-the-job language training so I'm not fussed about doing a course at uni, just if it might be useful for Classics then it'd be something to consider. But like I say, didn't have much hope there :rolleyes:

I was thinking German too. Especially as I do French atm, I don't want to limit myself to just the Romance strand of IE. My reasoning for Italian was that it might be easier as my first evening language course - haven't got much experience of inflected language so far, although I've booked my place at JACT Wells - and if I wanted to go down the "archaeology & art history" route by visiting Italy. However, this has made me think I might be able to wing it if I had to?:



Although the similarity between French and Italian is about the same as that between chimps and humans, so obviously even a few percent can make a big difference
Ah sorry I should have made it clearer: I meant specifically for the Classics. Career wise yes of course Russian, Arabic etc would be way more useful. I seem to recall a bank so desperate it rushed all applications with fluent Russian or Arabic to stage 4/6 of the applications...

Well Wikipedia is not the best source, I think most Classicists would happily challenge the simplistic way we consider Romance languages: i.e it is obvious there's been a massive semiotic shift in all the Romance languages, clearly they're not anything like "direct" descendents. Anyway linguistics aside, I don't think the differences between the Romance languages is something that should worry you, especially if you have Latin.

Reading will be quick to pick up, as for speaking, well my spoken Italian isn't that good and, to be honest, my one close Italian friend and I speak in Latin anyway so it doesn't come up. The thing is the best way to get spoken proficiency is to go there so it's all good.

Pretty much every archaeologist will pick up local languages btw, for example one of my old profs could speak mod Greek, Italian and Arabic thanks to excavations. You just...learn.
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Aesc
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#1316
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#1316
(Original post by The Lyceum)
Ah sorry I should have made it clearer: I meant specifically for the Classics. Career wise yes of course Russian, Arabic etc would be way more useful. I seem to recall a bank so desperate it rushed all applications with fluent Russian or Arabic to stage 4/6 of the applications...

Well Wikipedia is not the best source, I think most Classicists would happily challenge the simplistic way we consider Romance languages: i.e it is obvious there's been a massive semiotic shift in all the Romance languages, clearly they're not anything like "direct" descendents. Anyway linguistics aside, I don't think the differences between the Romance languages is something that should worry you, especially if you have Latin.

Reading will be quick to pick up, as for speaking, well my spoken Italian isn't that good and, to be honest, my one close Italian friend and I speak in Latin anyway so it doesn't come up. The thing is the best way to get spoken proficiency is to go there so it's all good.

Pretty much every archaeologist will pick up local languages btw, for example one of my old profs could speak mod Greek, Italian and Arabic thanks to excavations. You just...learn.
No, it's my fault, my question was just about Classics, just that if I could have my cake and eat it that would be even better! I guess if the best way to get spoken Italian is digs, my decision really is quite easy... German it will be! Danke schön :cool:
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riotgrrl
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#1317
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#1317
Do you guys have any advice for doing commentaries? Or helpful books for learning to analyse verse? I'm really struggling. It seems like the people who did a-level are all like "why YES just look at these spondees/tricholon/weird greek sounding word I've never heard of" and I have no clue what they're on about.
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Sappho
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#1318
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#1318
(Original post by Aesc)
No, it's my fault, my question was just about Classics, just that if I could have my cake and eat it that would be even better! I guess if the best way to get spoken Italian is digs, my decision really is quite easy... German it will be! Danke schön :cool:
To be honest with you, considering you're only now getting started with Latin, I wouldn't actually advise you to start learning another language at the same time, even if they're quite different, except if you really have a lot of experience in learning languages... German is certainly helpful (I do use it a lot), but there are decent summer courses, and I'd actually rather go for it at a later point, especially considering that you're not quite sure yet which career path you'd like to follow (which, obviously, is perfectly legitimate).
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Nox Aeterna
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#1319
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#1319
(Original post by The Lyceum)
Aye, but please don't take this as my endorsement of Renfrew. His work on Bronze age cults is alright...his stuff on Indo-Europeans is so laughable and at best used for toilet paper.

Yes the funding situation sucks. But, if you look at it from a depts view, they have little reason to fund BA/MA study since, despite what a few students may think, we're pretty unimportant and quite often just get in the way of things. Most students opt for the CDL, yes. I suspect securing one will get harder in future, alas, but in general the requisites are don't get in debt (i.e fail to pay rent, over your overdraft etc) for two years prior to your applying and it should go fine.
Of course. I've not read much of Renfrew's actual work, as archaeologically, I lean towards the celts, and neolithic/mesolithic western europe and Classical Archaeology. His introduction to archaeology with bahn is amazing though and his theoretical stuff is solid and sound. I should have made that clearer, damn!

Also, I know there is a thread on a latin summer school later this year, but seeing as there is none for Durham I though i'd ask here if anyone is going to the Durham Greek and Latin summer school this year? or if anyone has already been to it and what their thoughts are of it?
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SirMasterKey
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#1320
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#1320
My latin course this semester is just another glorified version of last year (in the grammar sense of it). :sad:
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