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    (Original post by RK)
    the character set we use for the new site is one which doesn't support the Japanese and other characters. As soon as I realised this we started working towards using a character set which does contain the Japanese characters however it's not such a simple job.
    So basically, you initialized vBulletin's underlying MySQL database using LATIN1 ages ago and now can't convert it to UTF-8 without breaking things like German umlauts?

    In that case, God help you. Converting a forum of TSR's size without breaking things even further is close to impossible.
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    Well I've just got an offer from Manchester for Japanese Studies and one from Newcastle for Japanese and Linguistics, so I thought I'd say something I'll TRY to keep up with this thread XD.
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    (Original post by wulfyrokujuyon_64)
    Well I've just got an offer from Manchester for Japanese Studies and one from Newcastle for Japanese and Linguistics, so I thought I'd say something I'll TRY to keep up with this thread XD.
    Congratz

    I might go to Manchester as well, if SOAS rejects me lol.
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    (Original post by asabashoyuki)
    Congratz

    I might go to Manchester as well, if SOAS rejects me lol.
    What makes you to put SOAS as a first choice? As I am also waiting for SOAS and somehow I might change my mind to put Manchester as my first choice..
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    (Original post by siu0129)
    What makes you to put SOAS as a first choice? As I am also waiting for SOAS and somehow I might change my mind to put Manchester as my first choice..
    Nearly nothing really, I might change my mind too (in fact I'll probably firm Manchester even if SOAS give me an offer)

    Advantages of SOAS? Hmm, lets say...I would like to stay in London...plus
    I might have more opportunities to study Japanese in SOAS. I would like to study more Japanese to get a higher mark and make it more easy for me to get a 1st hon as I like it.
    (Actually, I doubt both of SOAS and Manchester U would open any upper-further classes for post-JLPTN1 students but...)

    However, Manchester seems to be a more sensible choice. (although I would like to apply for a Masters course right after graduation so the Undergrad school might not be that important)

    So...meh, I don't know.
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    (Original post by asabashoyuki)
    Nearly nothing really, I might change my mind too (in fact I'll probably firm Manchester even if SOAS give me an offer)

    Advantages of SOAS? Hmm, lets say...I would like to stay in London...plus
    I might have more opportunities to study Japanese in SOAS. I would like to study more Japanese to get a higher mark and make it more easy for me to get a 1st hon as I like it.
    (Actually, I doubt both of SOAS and Manchester U would open any upper-further classes for post-JLPTN1 students but...)

    However, Manchester seems to be a more sensible choice. (although I would like to apply for a Masters course right after graduation so the Undergrad school might not be that important)

    So...meh, I don't know.
    For me, both of the two unis are in a city so it doesn't really matter....Looking at others posts, I've seen someone form SOAS who is doing Japanese now finds SOAS not very helpful in his/her study. Like...you have to pretty much work by yourself? I know we're supposed to be independent learners in uni..but I got a feeeling that I would get more support in Manchester. (it's just what i feel about it after I came back from the visit) Also for the 3rd yr, Manchester have a link with tokyo dai which I really want to go..this one of the reason that Manchester UNI attracts me : p
    Anyway, if you really want to focus on the language side, why don't you stay in Japan for a year after graduation instead?
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    (Original post by siu0129)
    For me, both of the two unis are in a city so it doesn't really matter....Looking at others posts, I've seen someone form SOAS who is doing Japanese now finds SOAS not very helpful in his/her study. Like...you have to pretty much work by yourself? I know we're supposed to be independent learners in uni..but I got a feeeling that I would get more support in Manchester. (it's just what i feel about it after I came back from the visit) Also for the 3rd yr, Manchester have a link with tokyo dai which I really want to go..this one of the reason that Manchester UNI attracts me : p
    Anyway, if you really want to focus on the language side, why don't you stay in Japan for a year after graduation instead?
    I think I know which post you are talking about. I was a bit concerned about it as well but as I applied for a different subject and professors might differ anyway so I didn't really feel anxious about it.

    Is Tou-Dai not an exchange partner of SOAS?

    Hmm..
    1. Expensive / 2. Might be a bit unrealistic since Japanese people are pretty xenophobic
    I don't really know, it might not be a bad choice but..I might just give myself one or two more years before deciding what to do after graduation.

    As you mentioned about 3rd yr (but not last year) I would assume you applied for Japanese? . Good luck, it is not the easiest language to learn.
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    (Original post by asabashoyuki)
    I think I know which post you are talking about. I was a bit concerned about it as well but as I applied for a different subject and professors might differ anyway so I didn't really feel anxious about it.

    Is Tou-Dai not an exchange partner of SOAS?

    Hmm..
    1. Expensive / 2. Might be a bit unrealistic since Japanese people are pretty xenophobic
    I don't really know, it might not be a bad choice but..I might just give myself one or two more years before deciding what to do after graduation.

    As you mentioned about 3rd yr (but not last year) I would assume you applied for Japanese? . Good luck, it is not the easiest language to learn.
    I see...I thought you were applying for Japanese too :P I am doing a joint honors with business management though. Tou dai...iam going to force myself to work hard haaha...but anyway,,thanks for your opinion. : )
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    (Original post by siu0129)
    I see...I thought you were applying for Japanese too :P I am doing a joint honors with business management though. Tou dai...iam going to force myself to work hard haaha...but anyway,,thanks for your opinion. : )
    I knew you would think that!

    In fact, I considered about apply to the same course you have but as it takes one more year, I gave up.

    Good luck!:cool:
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    More Japanese people in London :3
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    Hi,
    I don't want to learn Japanese as a whole (as beautiful a language as it is, of course), but I was wondered if someone could help me write some for the birthday card or a friend who does?

    If anyone is interested in lending a hand, could you please PM me? I'd be very grateful.

    Thank you
    x
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    Can't wait for the non-roman character bug to be fixed....

    Until then, I'll try resurecting this thread with a few questions:

    ° What's the difference between doushíte and doushíta? I understand there is one but didn't really get it...
    ° Likewise, I've been introduced to the ndesu form but I don't really get the use. It seems to me ndesu as an explaining sentence could very well be said using kara instead which would be easier to pronunce in my opinion, and as for its other uses such as ndesuka, I don't really understand what's so different with a simple desuka question.
    ° And finally, I've read "ni san nichi" / a couple days. Is it a set phrase or could I say for instance "juu juugo nichi" to say "for ten to fifteen days"?

    doumo
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    Can't wait for the non-roman character bug to be fixed....

    Until then, I'll try resurecting this thread with a few questions:

    ° What's the difference between doushíte and doushíta? I understand there is one but didn't really get it...
    ° Likewise, I've been introduced to the ndesu form but I don't really get the use. It seems to me ndesu as an explaining sentence could very well be said using kara instead which would be easier to pronunce in my opinion, and as for its other uses such as ndesuka, I don't really understand what's so different with a simple desuka question.
    ° And finally, I've read "ni san nichi" / a couple days. Is it a set phrase or could I say for instance "juu juugo nichi" to say "for ten to fifteen days"?

    doumo
    1. They are fundamentally different
    Doush!te - Why/How, similar to naze/nande
    Doushi!ta (from Dou-shimash!aa) - How are you? / Are you alright?

    2. It's just a way to enhance the "mood" of words spoken (if that makes sense)
    It's like the difference between "Why did you..." and "Why the hell did you....!!!"
    But yes, they are pretty similar and not-so-distinguishable.

    3. It's not a set phrase and "juu juugo nichi" is definitely grammatically wrong. (Nisannichi seems to be alright though)
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    ° Likewise, I've been introduced to the ndesu form but I don't really get the use. It seems to me ndesu as an explaining sentence could very well be said using kara instead which would be easier to pronunce in my opinion, and as for its other uses such as ndesuka, I don't really understand what's so different with a simple desuka question.
    According to everything I've ever looked this up in, in a question, it's a bit more intimate than just asking the question, like you're interested in what the answer is. In a statement, it adds more of an explanatory flavour. It's not the kind of thing that can be explained with a good analogy in English; you have to just feel it after having listened to thousands of hours of Japanese. My personal thoughts are that not using no enough is one of the things that makes you sound gaijin like. If you listen to Japanese people talk, they use nda, ndesu etc. all over the place.

    Be careful with kara - saying something kara, something is different to saying something no de, something. It's not a general purpose "because" that can be used in any situation (which is what it's usually taught as...). I was reading some Japanese blog post the other day which said that that overuse of kara is something gaijin do too often and makes them sound rude.
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    (Original post by Azimuth)
    According to everything I've ever looked this up in, in a question, it's a bit more intimate than just asking the question, like you're interested in what the answer is. In a statement, it adds more of an explanatory flavour. It's not the kind of thing that can be explained with a good analogy in English; you have to just feel it after having listened to thousands of hours of Japanese. My personal thoughts are that not using no enough is one of the things that makes you sound gaijin like. If you listen to Japanese people talk, they use nda, ndesu etc. all over the place.

    Be careful with kara - saying something kara, something is different to saying something no de, something. It's not a general purpose "because" that can be used in any situation (which is what it's usually taught as...). I was reading some Japanese blog post the other day which said that that overuse of kara is something gaijin do too often and makes them sound rude.
    My teacher actually said the opposite! She told us students often start using ndesu everytime after having learned it and that that wouldn't be very japanese-like, and would diminish its emphatic effect when used...

    Yeah, I wondered about node and kara too but the only difference I could find was that node was a tad more formal. Should be prefer ndesu's "explanatory" nuance instead then? Or is there other ways to explain causality?
    Is the blog in English or Japanese? If in English, could you share the link please? (I'm afraid my level of Japanese won't allow me to read anything short of educational short stories for the moment!)
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    My teacher actually said the opposite! She told us students often start using ndesu everytime after having learned it and that that wouldn't be very japanese-like, and would diminish its emphatic effect when used...
    I guess the key thing is to get the balance right. Stuff like, nandakedo, and nandayone are so common I wonder how much the "explanatory nuance" thing really rings true for native speakers. Either way I think it's a pretty subtle distinction that we as non-native speakers can't really fully appreciate without a lot of immersion.

    (Original post by Xurvi)
    Yeah, I wondered about node and kara too but the only difference I could find was that node was a tad more formal. Should be prefer ndesu's "explanatory" nuance instead then? Or is there other ways to explain causality?
    Is the blog in English or Japanese? If in English, could you share the link please? (I'm afraid my level of Japanese won't allow me to read anything short of educational short stories for the moment!)
    It was Japanese. I'd translate it for you, but unfortunately I can't find it now, I originally found it just Googling around for explanations of kara and node.

    But the impression I got was, kara emphasises the reason, whereas node emphasies the result. So with kara, it can sound like you're being more forceful or combative - you're saying "because of this, X happened", whereas node is more like "this happened, so X". More just, stating a fact rather than pushing an opinion. My rule of thumb is, if in doubt, use node - it's probably safer.
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    Ive got offers to study japanese at Leeds, newcaslte, machester and uclan

    Ive knocked it down to two now: leeds or newcastle, and so far im leaning more towards leeds.

    what are your thoughts you guys? Any advice?
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    Regarding sugiru ~ to exceed

    I was told by my teacher that it can only be a bad thing and consequently can't be used with adjectives that are a good thing (yoi, oishi, etc). Since in French we tend to use 'trop' in casual conversation to emphasise something (eg "c'est trop bon", it's very tasty, lit. It's too tasty) she thought she'd warn us not to do that with sugiru by habit and saying such things as kawaisugiru or oishisugiru.

    The thing is, in Tae Kim's Complete Guide to Japanese, he uses as an example ii->yosugiru. ii is obviously a good thing so I've got two opposite statements.

    Can we actually use sugiru with "good" things? Or is it restricted to bad things as my teacher says? Or maybe the use with good things is only for cases where it's bad? ie "She's too nice to be sincere", "she's too nice for her own good" or something like that?
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    People say kawaisugiru, kakkoyosugiru etc. all the time.

    http://www.google.co.jp/#q=%22%E3%81...1b187d688b729f

    http://www.google.co.jp/#q=%22%E3%81...1b187d688b729f
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    I see, cheers.
 
 
 
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