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Have Your Degree Choices Changed Since Year 11 to Now? Watch

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    English was my best subject throughout secondary school so I expected to do apply for that, but also thought about psychology and economics. Settled on ancient history in year 12 and then changed to classics, which isn't that big a jump.
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    Fine Art, Psychology, Neuroscience, Medicine. Major lulz.
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    (Original post by Smeh)
    I think I wanted to do chemistry or physics.
    Not too much changed i'm doing engineering now so...
    Physics and engineering basically have the same calculations. Main difference is that engineering is real and physics is more theoretical with everything done in ideal conditions.
    Edit: I plan on eventually becoming an engineer, but going via a physics route. I'm not sure how easy or how long it will take. But I need to take physics further before I can be satisfied with doing a job I like!!
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    My degree choices ended up being like a homogenous catalyst- they went through several changes, but went back to the original by the end of it. A nice full circle . Chemical Engineering was the first time I'd really thought "Wow here's a subject I'd actually like to do at uni". After that I considered several other subjects (i.e. Chemistry, Biochemistry, Civil Engineering, Economics, Maths, Medicine, Physics) and at one point had provisionally decided on doing a Chemistry degree instead, but in the end I was always going to end up doing Chemical Engineering. It's the only subject for me
    Wow what subjects did you do at AS? Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economics?
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    (Original post by Freerider101)
    Physics and engineering basically have the same calculations. Main difference is that engineering is real and physics is more theoretical with everything done in ideal conditions.
    Edit: I plan on eventually becoming an engineer, but going via a physics route. I'm not sure how easy or how long it will take. But I need to take physics further before I can be satisfied with doing a job I like!!
    Why do the long and convoluted route? It would probably be a lot easier (read: cheaper :mmm:) to just go straight for engineering.
    Although I do kind of see why. Physics is just so interesting.
    Wouldn't say it's basically the same calculations though... At my uni, we're doing completely different modules to the physicists. E.g. We do fluid mechanics, they do quantum mechanics
    Ah well.. Good luck with your UCAS!
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    (Original post by Freerider101)
    Physics and engineering basically have the same calculations.
    No.

    Main difference is that engineering is real and physics is more theoretical with everything done in ideal conditions.
    Again, no.

    In university engineering things are nearly always done in ideal or fairly ideal conditions; this is because university "engineering" is more about mathematical analysis than proper engineering and several mathematical analysis questions can be given in the space of a few hours if these in are ideal or close to idea conditions. Whereas a real-world engineering problem could take days or even weeks to solve, and may require a team of people.

    Edit: I plan on eventually becoming an engineer, but going via a physics route. I'm not sure how easy or how long it will take. But I need to take physics further before I can be satisfied with doing a job I like!!
    Without an engineering degree you almost certainly won't be an engineer. The engineering positions in the companies I'm looking at are simply not open to physics graduates. And if they were then you'd have a hard time selling yourself to them if your degree wasn't in engineering.

    Physicists have a different skill-set from engineers and are thus valuable in other roles such as research, and if you really love the theoretical side of physics then engineering isn't really for you, as you're just as likely to be spending your time dealing with suppliers, meetings, selecting suitable components from large lists and witnessing testing of products than you are doing calculations. Physicists are hugely important in engineering and technology and I'm sure you'd get an appropriate role within an engineering firm.

    You could get into engineering with an appropriate MSc, although you'd most likely have to fund this yourself and MScs aren't cheap - the good ones at my university cost over 15K. So if you really want to be an engineer then do an engineering undergrad! No need for expensive MScs and straight into the world of work after an MEng!
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    (Original post by Freerider101)
    Wow what subjects did you do at AS? Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economics?
    Close. For Scottish Highers, which are equivalent to AS, I took English (required), Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

    This year I'm taking Maths, Chemistry, Physics and French to Advanced Highers (equivalent A2) . If I'd decided to do an Economics degree I would have taken Economics Advanced Higher instead of French.
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    Initially, I'd wanted to do medicine, more because of pushy teachers who's opinion was, if you're bright and good at science you MUST do medicine. Anyway after some thought I realised I'd absolutley hate to do it, and may as well apply for something I enjoyed, so I did and have now decided to do chemistry. A very good decission I think.
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    (Original post by Freerider101)
    Physics and engineering basically have the same calculations. Main difference is that engineering is real and physics is more theoretical with everything done in ideal conditions.
    Edit: I plan on eventually becoming an engineer, but going via a physics route. I'm not sure how easy or how long it will take. But I need to take physics further before I can be satisfied with doing a job I like!!
    It is possible, and I have met one physicist working in an engineering role.. but 99% of all engineers I have met have had an engineering degree in the relevant discipline. Are you sure you've thought this out fully?

    Besides, there are plenty of interesting graduate careers for physicists you know... :/

    (Original post by Freerider101)
    Wow what subjects did you do at AS? Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economics?
    Close. For Scottish Highers, which are equivalent to AS, I took English (required), Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

    This year I'm taking Maths, Chemistry, Physics and French to Advanced Highers (equivalent A2) . If I'd decided to do an Economics degree I would have taken Economics Advanced Higher instead of French.
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    LOL, interesting thread, some funny ones!

    Mine was full circle also.

    Law, Drama, Media, English, Medicine (the foundation year for those who picked arty a levels rather than science haha), Law.

    Now, it's all about the Law!
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    (Original post by Smack)
    No.
    What I meant was they have the same numerical methods but different application. Like they both involve the same skills to solve hard equations but engineering uses totally different notation I guess.

    (Original post by Smack)
    Without an engineering degree you almost certainly won't be an engineer. The engineering positions in the companies I'm looking at are simply not open to physics graduates. And if they were then you'd have a hard time selling yourself to them if your degree wasn't in engineering.
    I understand what you're saying. But apparently most large companies employ physicists to work along side engineers and a physicist can naturally progress into a specialist field in engineering once they've been trained up.

    (Original post by Smack)
    Physicists have a different skill-set from engineers and are thus valuable in other roles such as research, and if you really love the theoretical side of physics then engineering isn't really for you, as you're just as likely to be spending your time dealing with suppliers, meetings, selecting suitable components from large lists and witnessing testing of products than you are doing calculations. Physicists are hugely important in engineering and technology and I'm sure you'd get an appropriate role within an engineering firm.
    Surely a lot of the skills are similar, and interchangeable?

    (Original post by Smack)
    You could get into engineering with an appropriate MSc, although you'd most likely have to fund this yourself and MScs aren't cheap - the good ones at my university cost over 15K. So if you really want to be an engineer then do an engineering undergrad! No need for expensive MScs and straight into the world of work after an MEng!
    I've already applied for a MPhys, so its too late to change. But I'm fairly sure that this is the degree I want to do. Just not 100% about the job prospects.
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    in year 11 i wanted to be a journalist then went to college did some film making and loved editing so now i want to do that and do it at uni
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    Yr 11:
    I wanted to be a speech therapist.
    A Level subjects - Biology, English Lang [because it included elements on speech development], Psychology and ICT.

    Yr 12:
    Hated my college so moved to a different one, which didn't offer the latter three courses.
    A Level subjects - English Lit/Lang, History, Religious Studies, Business Studies, General Studies.

    Yr12/13:
    Kept changing my mind regarding university courses, or even if I wanted to go at all.
    Options I considered included Journalism, Occupational Therapy, History, English Literature, American Studies.

    Right up until the day I sent my form off, I still hadn't made up my mind. There was a mixture of American Studies, English and History courses on there. Then I just went for it, it being History, and I think I made the right choice.
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    (Original post by Wookie42)
    Ah, the easy days of year 11. I remember getting As in Maths and Physics without really having to try too hard, but also the same in Geography and I loved it. So in the end I took Physics, Maths, Chemistry and Geography to AS level with the intention of either doing Physics or Geography at degree level... I proceeded to fail Physics, Maths and Chemistry with flying colours, Geography being the only AS I'm proud of (B). Quit school thinking my life was over and went to college as a bit of an afterthought. Decided to study a 3 A level equivalent in IT since I had always been good with computers and seemed to enjoy the challenges they created. I've now got offers to study IT at some half decent universities (i.e Liverpool) and couldn't be happier that I won't have to spend another moment of my life with Chemical formulae or ridiculous equations. A little sad I couldn't do Geography I suppose, but that's the way it goes

    Year 11 seems ages ago, when in order to pass or get a half decent grade most people simply had to turn up to the lesson. I miss those days
    Wait until university and you'll see how easy A-Levels are
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    I was set on studying Biology in the UK for the longest time and was excited for the Chemistry, Maths, and Geography the degree would entail; and here I am studying either English or Comparative Literature, and three languages, in the US, after having hated the study of both for the longest time.

    Life is a funny thing.
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    I wanted to do an English degree until about halfway through Year 11, then I first had a look at PPE courses. That was also the time at which I started reading a lot of non-fiction.
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    (Original post by Freerider101)
    What I meant was they have the same numerical methods but different application. Like they both involve the same skills to solve hard equations but engineering uses totally different notation I guess.
    Fair enough.

    I understand what you're saying. But apparently most large companies employ physicists to work along side engineers and a physicist can naturally progress into a specialist field in engineering once they've been trained up.
    Yes. But it's still a longer road to becoming an engineer. Nor are these science roles any less important or valuable, so if you're good at physics and you enjoy it then there's no reason why you'd want to change into engineering.

    Surely a lot of the skills are similar, and interchangeable?
    I don't know since I've never done an MPhys but an MEng includes lots of management/finance type modules, practical "hands on" work, and design work, where you'll be put into groups, given a problem and told you have to make something to fix it, and you start from scratch.

    I've already applied for a MPhys, so its too late to change. But I'm fairly sure that this is the degree I want to do. Just not 100% about the job prospects.
    Probably very similar to the MEng, except you won't be eligible for jobs that specify an MEng.
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    When I was in year 11, I wanted to do some sort of German lanuage orientated degree, and become a translator. Unfortunately my college was no longer to offer A Level German so I had to choose something else. As soon as I started my A Level in Law I loved it, and thought this would be a fab career for me, so I started the LLB at uni.

    Did a year and hated it, so ended up changing my course. Finished my degree 3 years ago and am now studying for an MA and embarking on a career change.
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    I wanted to do medicine the most in year 11, although at the time dentistry, biology and French would also have been options.
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    Not a lot. Wanted to study Chemistry and Maths, therefore chose Pharmacy as it combines the two and will provide me with a professional degree.
 
 
 
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