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    (Original post by CitizensUnited)
    21000 -(35*12) = £20580 per year, after the student loan has been paid off.
    £9000 is a good idea, because the government will reduce university funding, so therefore having a higher cap will provide a better education.Even if your teacher is still paying his loan back, it will be a teeny amount of his actual salary (about 2% of his salary)

    Yeah but my point was that what if he wants to save? What if he wants to buy a house? I mean there are other stuffs that would come in. It's just a lot of debt.

    By the way, the text in bold is ridiculous! :P The uni actually left with less money, 80% of their budget are to be cut and raising the fees will probably just toreplace that amount. They are also pressured to increase bursary and grants for poorer students - so yeah, they will be left with less money. This won't even provide better education... how can you measure the quality of the education though? I have been hearing that the universities will have to provide some kind of proves of their quality of education but then they are meant to do that anyway? They are meant to provide quality education even if the fee cap of £9000 is not there!
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    (Original post by street.lovin')
    Yeah but my point was that what if he wants to save? What if he wants to buy a house? I mean there are other stuffs that would come in. It's just a lot of debt.
    Surely that will be the same problem everyone has so house prices will fall/not rise until they are affordable.

    Also nobody is being forced to go to uni, they can choose not to if they think that'll make them better off.
    ---------------
    But where the hell did you get someone on 21k paying £35/month?
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11483638

    Note this paragraph.

    So will universities get more money?

    Universities have been struggling to meet surging demand for places. Many years of rising investment under Labour have given way to cuts as the economic climate has changed.

    The government admits that, in general, the money raised from tuition fees will simply replace major cuts to teaching budgets.

    The Browne review's conclusions were modelled on an 80% cut to teaching grants.

    Cuts of 40% to the higher education budget were announced in the spending review on 20 October 2010. But that budget includes student grants, which are unlikely to be significantly cut, as well as the teaching grant, suggesting that teaching funds are likely to face cuts much deeper than 40%.

    However, some universities may be able to charge fees high enough to enable them to increase their funding despite the budget cuts.



    Basically, those charging the top end will be able to increase funding - therefore, universities with a better reputation will make more money and continue to get better whilst the others don't - leaving an education standards gap.

    Then the lower universities will try and play catch up and ask for access to more funding which will then raise fee's so they can catch up with the top universities to avoid a massive standards gap opening.

    Universities will make more money. The only thing is that instead of increasing it through government funding (taxpayer) they are doing it directly to the university.
    This allows the government to cut funding to use it elsewhere whilst still increasing university funding - a lot of people don't even realise they will pay more tax towards education instead of other areas because of how slyly its being done.
    If universities make more money, surely that is a good thing? They will be able to provide a better university education.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Delete the bolded part of your post and this is a perfect post.

    You are absolutely spot-on, the OP is a complete tosser, and I remember having seen posts by him admitting to having turned down cleaning (or possibly manual labour) jobs, simply because they don't comply to his "interests". People don't seem to realise that job choice is a MASSIVE luxury, the majority of the world works whatever job they manage to find just to scrape by and survive. I wish it didn't have to be that way, but it is. I appreciate the luxury we enjoy in this part of the world but some people just take advantage of it too much.

    I am ecstatic that there are new policies being implemented to penalise people who turn down jobs.
    Provide evidence or take that back.

    Btw, I think you're a tosser as well.
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    (Original post by street.lovin')
    Yeah but my point was that what if he wants to save? What if he wants to buy a house? I mean there are other stuffs that would come in. It's just a lot of debt.

    By the way, the text in bold is ridiculous! :P The uni actually left with less money, 80% of their budget are to be cut and raising the fees will probably just toreplace that amount. They are also pressured to increase bursary and grants for poorer students - so yeah, they will be left with less money. This won't even provide better education... how can you measure the quality of the education though? I have been hearing that the universities will have to provide some kind of proves of their quality of education but then they are meant to do that anyway? They are meant to provide quality education even if the fee cap of £9000 is not there!
    Even if their funding is cut, the raised cap allows them to get more money from the student (therefore they still receive the same amount of money, perhaps even more).
    And, the amount you have to pay back is miniscule. If the people earning £21000 per year have to pay back £35 each month, that amount is small, and you will never see it anyway, so it's not like you feel deprived of it. I mean, if you want an extra £35 each month, just don't spend so much on luxuries like meals out, or going to the pub, or buying organic produce etc. etc.
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    Provide evidence or take that back.

    Btw, I think you're a tosser as well.
    To take the excruciating time to look through your NUMEROUS posts is not something I care to do. It would have been round about the time when the Conversatives were stating their policy to decrease benefits for those who refuse jobs. As I remember you weren't happy about that, and I think we all know why.
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      (Original post by scottpilgrim)
      erm...isn't it the case that all you people already at uni wont be affected by this?
      so whats the problem?
      We aren't all ego-centric...we care about those coming after us...our younger brothers and sisters etc.

      That's the damned trouble with too many 'products' of the Thatcher mentality...self, self, self.
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      (Original post by CitizensUnited)
      And, the amount you have to pay back is miniscule. If the people earning £21000 per year have to pay back £35 each month, that amount is small, and you will never see it anyway, so it's not like you feel deprived of it. I mean, if you want an extra £35 each month, just don't spend so much on luxuries like meals out, or going to the pub, or buying organic produce etc. etc.
      How do you never see it? Its paid to you from Graduation to the following April, then your pay goes down. Its also on every pay slip.

      You need to compare the tax home pay of someone with loan payments vs no loan payments. By using gross pay you're suggesting the person sees that pay, whereas its already a quarter lower than you're stating before the loan payment is taken.
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      (Original post by yawn)
      We aren't all ego-centric...we care about those coming after us...our younger brothers and sisters etc.

      That's the damned trouble with too many 'products' of the Thatcher mentality...self, self, self.
      errrr you and I might be children of Thatcher, the 17 year olds on here are Majors kids...
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        (Original post by Matthew_Lowson)
        But you will have been watching Telly to break the terms. They dont fine you if you leave the tv off until you've paid up then there is no problem.
        As long as you has a TV that is capable of receiving a television signal, you're going to be fined if you don't have a current license.

        Not watching it just not afford an exemption from prosecution.
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        (Original post by Quady)
        How do you never see it? Its paid to you from Graduation to the following April, then your pay goes down. Its also on every pay slip.

        You need to compare the tax home pay of someone with loan payments vs no loan payments. By using gross pay you're suggesting the person sees that pay, whereas its already a quarter lower than you're stating before the loan payment is taken.
        By that, I mean you don't ever have to go to physically hand over the repayment in cash.
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        (Original post by CitizensUnited)
        By that, I mean you don't ever have to go to physically hand over the repayment in cash.
        Yup. But I don't think you realised your pay goes down between the march and april after graduating.
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          (Original post by yawn)
          As long as you has a TV that is capable of receiving a television signal, you're going to be fined if you don't have a current license.

          Not watching it just not afford an exemption from prosecution.
          Okay stand corrected
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          (Original post by Quady)
          Yup. But I don't think you realised your pay goes down between the march and april after graduating.
          I gathered that. You don't ever see the £35 physically, you will not feel deprived of the money. (£15333 / year as opposed to £15873 / year : will you really notice the difference?)
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          All of this is not true.
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          (Original post by CitizensUnited)
          If universities make more money, surely that is a good thing? They will be able to provide a better university education.
          Yes but someone said funding will be cut. It won't. That's my argument. Universities will make more money.
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          (Original post by Quady)
          Degree = no mortgage does it?
          Nope, i was hitting on the fact that £9000 or no £9000, your going to get in debt one way or another.

          A mortgage with a degree > A mortgage without a degree
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          Screw you OP, get off this forum.
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          (Original post by jb9191)
          Yes but someone said funding will be cut. It won't. That's my argument. Universities will make more money.
          I could just be being naïve, but I'm arguing that as the universities "make more money", they will have more money to provide a better education and therefore benefiting the students.
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          (Original post by CitizensUnited)
          I could just be being naïve, but I'm arguing that as the universities "make more money", they will have more money to provide a better education and therefore benefiting the students.
          You said.

          Originally Posted by CitizensUnited
          21000 -(35*12) = £20580 per year, after the student loan has been paid off.
          £9000 is a good idea, because the government will reduce university funding, so therefore having a higher cap will provide a better education.
          Even if your teacher is still paying his loan back, it will be a teeny amount of his actual salary (about 2% of his salary)


          Which is not the case. Funding will increase.
         
         
         
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