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    (Original post by LisaWilliams)
    I have spent the whole of today sieving through the F211 past papers! I should just not be lazy and revise the whole specification so i'm ready for anything, oh well :P
    Doing past papers is good! Alot of the stuff overlaps with A2 like membranes and functions of chroloplast/mitochondria. I hate lungs/heart.. its easy but the examiners are really picky over the words! & btw the precautions and procedure is more or less the same. Just that in the procedure you have to do something with a ruler.
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    Can someone please explain why if athletes train at high altitudes they perform better at sea level? I've looked at the mark scheme but I dont understand the theory.. anyone?
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    (Original post by Rosi M)
    Can someone please explain why if athletes train at high altitudes they perform better at sea level? I've looked at the mark scheme but I dont understand the theory.. anyone?
    There is less oxygen up there so the atheletes' bodies just basically produce more red blood cells so that they can take in as much oxygen as possible. If you think about the life-span of a red blood cell (about 120 days I think?) then that'll tell you that they will stay in your body for a while even after you've left the high altitude. This means you can take more oxygen into your system and last longer. Then just go up there to 'top up', I guess.
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    (Original post by Rosi M)
    Can someone please explain why if athletes train at high altitudes they perform better at sea level? I've looked at the mark scheme but I dont understand the theory.. anyone?
    i think it must be something to do with the fact that the oxygen tension / partial pressure of oxygen / oxygen concentration is lower at high altitudes .. so the body adapts to the lack of oxygen by increasing the number of RBCs .. on wikipedia under altitude training it says:
    the body may adapt to the relative lack of oxygen hypoxia in one or more ways such as increasing the mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin ... when such athletes travel to competitions at lower altitudes they will still have a higher concentration of red blood cells for 10-14 days, and this gives them a competitive advantage
    i'm not 100% sure though. was this a past paper question?
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    which other past papers should i do except for the actual f211 ones
    from the legacy ones...?
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    i thought id post some random notes


    Diaphgram CONTRACTS & pushes digestive organs DOWN
    External intercostal muscles CONTRACT to RAISE ribs
    Volume of chest cavity INCREASES
    Pressure in chest cavity DROP
    Air moves IN
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    (Original post by 786girl)
    which other past papers should i do except for the actual f211 ones
    from the legacy ones...?


    I wouldn't really both with legacy ones. There's four F211 past papers which are enough to cover most if not all of the specification. I would print of the F211 specification and know it be heart, that way you're unlikely to be thrown in the exam and wont have wasting time learning things in legacy papers that aren't in the F211 specification
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    Everyone came to this thread 2 days before the exam! Haha
    Oh yeah - does anyone have the link for the spec?
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    (Original post by OwenFerny)
    There is less oxygen up there so the atheletes' bodies just basically produce more red blood cells so that they can take in as much oxygen as possible. If you think about the life-span of a red blood cell (about 120 days I think?) then that'll tell you that they will stay in your body for a while even after you've left the high altitude. This means you can take more oxygen into your system and last longer. Then just go up there to 'top up', I guess.
    (Original post by giraffegiraffe)
    i think it must be something to do with the fact that the oxygen tension / partial pressure of oxygen / oxygen concentration is lower at high altitudes .. so the body adapts to the lack of oxygen by increasing the number of RBCs .. on wikipedia under altitude training it says:

    i'm not 100% sure though. was this a past paper question?
    Thanks guys

    & Yep giraffegiraffe.. it was a past paper question. Came up in 2007 and back again in 2009.. the same question so thought ok this needs learning! Its quite simple now that I think of it
    x
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    Not too sure what you mean by a spec, but there's a checklist of all of the things you should know for the exam on the CD in the back of the OCR textbook And revision cards, too. That CD's pretty good actually... haha
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    (Original post by OwenFerny)
    Not too sure what you mean by a spec, but there's a checklist of all of the things you should know for the exam on the CD in the back of the OCR textbook And revision cards, too. That CD's pretty good actually... haha
    Whats so good about the CD? Im hearing about it quite alot! & I thought the specification was the "learning objectives" on each spread?
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    (Original post by OwenFerny)
    Not too sure what you mean by a spec, but there's a checklist of all of the things you should know for the exam on the CD in the back of the OCR textbook And revision cards, too. That CD's pretty good actually... haha
    Yeah, sorry I meant Specification list. Do you have it on PC so you can copy/paste or upload?
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    Anyone know the link to MONDAY 1st JUNE 2009 BIOLOGY LEGACY PAPER MARK SCHEME- TRANSPORT? Thanks! Its not on the paper bank!
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    Hardest topics; Haemoglobin (fetal, affinity, etc), CO2 Distribution (5% in blood plasma, 10%..etc), LYMPHATIC system, Translocation.
    What do you guys think?
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    (Original post by xMaGic)
    Hardest topics; Haemoglobin (fetal, affinity, etc), CO2 Distribution (5% in blood plasma, 10%..etc), LYMPHATIC system, Translocation.
    What do you guys think?
    Hmm yeah in a way but I find the content easy, its just the wording thats so difficult to get right in the exam.. thats what ive noticed. You might write a whole essay and its right but you've missed key words out.. I would prefer to get asked about that than some wierd stuff on clones or stem cells :confused:
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    I dunno. In my experience (though, that's not much XD) CDs have always sucked. But this one has a lot of useful stuff on it, check it out I don't have it on my computer though, sorry man.

    Yeah I agree the lymphatic system is pretty hard.. how's the CO2 transported again? Hydrowatsit?
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    does anyone else think that, after doing all the past papers for this spec that, 2010 may was the hardest? no wonder im having to resit it
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    (Original post by Rosi M)
    Hmm yeah in a way but I find the content easy, its just the wording thats so difficult to get right in the exam.. thats what ive noticed. You might write a whole essay and its right but you've missed key words out.. I would prefer to get asked about that than some wierd stuff on clones or stem cells :confused:
    True, always try reading question properly - i got 0 marks on a 6 marker because i didnt read but w.e i said was correct. Learnt a lesson lol
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    (Original post by xMaGic)
    Everyone came to this thread 2 days before the exam! Haha
    Oh yeah - does anyone have the link for the spec?
    http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/oc...d_gce_spec.pdf

    pg 8
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    Can anyone form a list of all possible 7 mark questions? You know the one that has "one mark available for the quality of written communication" written before the answer space.

    So far I have:

    - Protein synthesis & division of Labour
    - Different ways to cross the Phospholipid bilayer
    - Outlining the whole Mitosis process

    (So far in module 1)

    Spoiler:
    Show


    (Original post by xMaGic)
    x
    (Original post by dansheriff)
    x
    (Original post by Rosi M)
    x
    (Original post by hellosarah)
    x
    Maybe you guys could help
 
 
 
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