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    Having read these reviews after passing a telephone interview I must say I was completely put off attending the day.

    I decided there was nothing to lose so attended 26th Feb '15 and was very glad I did, although unsuccessful at the end of the day!

    I'm rather unsure where the negative reviews have come from and feel I must write this to inform others who have been made feel unsure about this company.

    Firstly, they are a genuine company (not sure where info to the contrary has come from...?) and the day was conducted very well throughout. Just about everybody there was a relatively recent graduate from completely different academic backgrounds and people were very talkative on arrival.

    The day starts with ice breakers such as stand up, say your name, your best non-academic achievement and your star sign (not sure why star sign as the vast majority were rational people who don't believe in magic... perhaps something that could be changed!). This was in front of 4 staff of Pareto and 8 clients of Pareto and everybody was immediately made to feel comfortable and confident.

    The group tasks are just designed to get people talking and this is assessed - just be yourself and be confident!

    The individual 3 minute presentations are the most beneficial part of the day which any prospective applicant wants to plan and rehearse as this is where you are given opportunity to present to Pareto staff and clients in a professional manner and really sell yourself.

    Finally, a 1-1 interview which was very very informal and just clarifies your wants, such as desired sales sector, salary expectations, location preferences etc.

    Overall, and again although I was unsuccessful, I would recommend anybody to go to this should you feel you would make a good sales person and you will gain great experience of a thorough assessment day and gain good advice during time needing filling on interview techniques, CV hints and sales advice.

    In addition, unless they have changed their format from when older reviews on TSR were written, they provide a refreshment break about 2 and a half hours in where there is free tea/coffee, crisps etc and time to visit the bathroom. Nothing unfriendly about the company at all and they seem to really take care of the successful applicants, investing a lot of time into them and making sure they find employment very quickly!
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    After graduating around 2 years ago, I didn't really know where to begin out of Uni, having done a degree in Sports Coaching and subsequently injuring myself, wanted to try my hand at sales. Fortunately, one of my fellow graduates had landed a job at Pareto and thought it would be good for me to come a long to an assessment day.

    the day itself is so useful to work out whether one can actually cut it at sales, the pressure is immense but prepares you completely for the sales environment. Pareto placed me within 2 weeks and I am still at the same company now. The initial 5-day course enabled me to get a real leg-up and insight into several different sales roles and industries. I'd recommend anyone to try their hand at the assessment day through Pareto to give them the best possible start into sales.
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    I got back from the assessment day in London yesterday, I very nearly didn't go because I live in Plymouth and it was such a long way, I had read so many bad reviews that I nearly didn't bother. However I did, and I am quite glad I made the effort. The assessment day was informative, I went there and have never really thought about a career in sales, by the end of the day I was really hoping to get in because I had heard lots of good things. Here's a run down of the day:
    You get there and they give you a name tag, take a photo and write a short description of you (I didn't see mine but a guy I spoke to had seen his- it said 'nice tie')
    Then you get split into groups, we were in two groups of about 20 people, make sure you chat to people, they like to see that. They're assessing you throughout the entire day, don't be fidgeting or slouching- you'll lose points for that.
    Then someone comes in and asks some questions- make sure you do your research- what pareto law stands for etc.
    Then, in alphabetical order you stand up and say your name, star sign and greatest non academic achievement. I've just had my feedback and they said in that part I excelled because I spoke with confidence and was likeable. I don't think it's really about what you've done, more about the way you present yourself. If you can think of some achievement that involves problem solving they like that.
    Then you get the group tasks. This is that nasa exercise, you can get the answers online. Again though, it's less about the answers, more about the way you present yourself. Even if you don't know the answer, they're looking for people that can persuade others. Use persuasion and you'll score highly in that task, make sure you stand out- don't be loud and aggressive though, persuasive.
    Second task was this red/blue exercise. This is important- listen to the three pointers that the person will give you at the start. Basically this task is about working with the other team (You are split into two teams of 10). They want you to get the maxiumum score, NOT the most. Sounds confusing I know, basically you get a board with 4 rows, 4 columns. Then a smaller board that is the key. They'll explain the exercise but its about getting the maximum points- red and blue gives you + 5, blue and blue gives you +3, blue and red gives you -5 and red and red gives you -3. Or something like that. BUT, the other team has a different board, so you have to work with the other team to get the maximum points between you. If you are in the assessment, and everyone automatically thinks you're against the other team (Like we did), then make sure you say 'BUT GUYS, SHE SAID GET THE MAXIMUM, NOT THE MOST'. They'll love that. So anyway yeah again persuasive skills, but listening skills as well. They exercise is kind of confusing, so listen hard. And make sure you fill in the whole board.
    Then you have a little break, some crisps, drink etc.
    Then they call you out to do you 1:1 interview, which is nothing to worry about, literally a chat to see where you want to work etc. Your presentation isn't too scary, I did mine to just one woman, make sure you keep an eye on your time, speak with confidence and show that you have a passion in sales. Interact with the assessor, maintain eye contact without being creepy, influence and persuade her. Just be bubbly and likeable, not aggressive just confident.
    While people are being taken out for the presentation and that they got some people in to talk about CVs and interviews etc, being in sales. Really useful and informative.
    Then, they come in and say that they have made their decision, it was a really hard call etc... It is really X factor, they call your name and call you into a room. I was in the successful group so she came in and was like you guys are.. successful! We all just kinda smiled and she was like come on this is a big deal, and we were like woooo. Super lame. But then you all go to the pub, and celebrate. Two days later i get a call giving me feedback, it's really detailed and informative so use it. I want to start work in 1 month, so we shall see how it goes.

    All in all I was surprising happy with the day, I had never been to an assessment day before but it was actually kinda fun, obviously there were some times that were boring and I imagine you'd be pretty annoyed if you didn't get in because it's half a day and probably a bit of travelling, but honestly if you're confident and persuasive I can't see you not getting it.
    Good luck!
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    I know this is 3 years late but I'll give you my experience as it will ultimately show you how precise, professional and real Pareto Law is.

    I applied for a graduate job on 12th April 2015, on the 15th I was then called up by a graduate manager in the London office and she explained Pareto to me and what was involved. I partook in a telephone interview and passed. I was then invited to an assessment day but also to a separate assessment day for one of their clients. I turned down the clients assessment day and attended the normal Pareto one.

    I passed the assessment day and literally within two days I had three highly recognisable companies willing to assess and interview me. I have now due to the Pareto process, landed a role with a great deal of significance and with great opportunities within two weeks of passing their assessment day.

    Basically, you will be successful with Pareto, and with their exclusive client base if .... you have what it takes to make a successful sales person. Pursue with them and if they can help you, I promise they will. If they don't select you to go forward, don't take it to heart. It just means that you just aren't quite suitable for their clients. Go back and prove them wrong when you have landed that sales job, they will love it.

    The team at Pareto know what they are looking for, they are very intelligent in their process and experienced in sales. They select graduate candidates that they believe have the raw ingredients to be successful in sales, not the brightest or the person who has the most on their CV. It's up to their clients fundamentally as to who gets employed, Pareto just find the right people that are suitable to their clients.

    This is a reply to give you clarification about any doubts about this agency and what they promise. Hope this helps.
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    I read all of the positives and negatives of the company before confirming my place at an assessment centre, I was completely against going but my friend advised to go just to get practice and plus it wasn't too far to travel. I didn't get through and it wasn't my objective of the day. Rather to get experience of brutal assessment centres and to also see if the reviews were actually a fair representation of the company.

    So this is the real lowdown of the company. Honest as can be.
    Positives:
    1. Yes they can get you a job.
    2. They are a real company that exists.
    3. They provide an opportunity to get a taster of what an assessment centre and telephone interview is like.

    Negatives:
    1. They resemble time-share holidays and pyramid schemes: They are made to seem like a highly lucrative recruitment firm whereas they have no substance. For example:
    -Buying likes on their facebook page
    - making a number of accounts on this forum to give positive feedback on their own firm
    -Staff stressing at the assessment centre: 'please dont leave bad feedback on the internet, give us a chance to explain why we are so poorly run'

    2. They accept 90% of those that they telephone interview: Hang on this seems positive?!? OK let me explain, 60% of those 90 are 'fillers', those that are just competent enough to look like they should be at the assessment centre. When 50 people arrive for a job it makes it seem like a really competition; hence the filler tactic.

    3. They are unprofessional: the assessment centre was meant to finish at 17:30, it finished at 18:45. Subsequently, 4-5 people missed their transport back home having traveled from places like Newcastle and Coventry. Yes, the X-factor method of results occurs. - We all waited in a room for 3 hours for the results. However, it was nice of them to try and entertain us in the room by playing games in which 10% of candidates engaged in. The other 90% cursing pareto law for taking so long to tell us the result. I almost forgot to mention the 40 minute lunch break in which the lunch disappears within 20 minutes of arriving.

    4. Those who turn up to the assessment centre do so for a reason: the backgrounds of possibly 50% of the candidates were 2.2 degrees in sports science, surprisingly a few lawyers and economists were also there with 2.1's, but from universities which you have to scroll a long way down for on the league table. Those who work for pareto law are from a similar background to those apply.

    5. Pareto Law has appalling criteria for what a good candidate is. Yes, their clipboards literally give points for a nice coloured tie and polished boots. But on the more serious criteria's such as group exercise, there only criteria is to be loud and act as if you have control. Nothing to do with actually achieving the outcome of the task. I persistently presented the correct answers to the group as I'd researched and memorised them. Due to the big ego wars which took place amongst our group I gave up and just agreed with whatever they wanted to do. Suprisingly our group came last in both exercises but suprising 3/4 of the group were successful on the day. Their moto is to get 20% of the best salesmans to make 80% of the difference to the company. In other words, if you can talk for england; your in.

    6. There definition of success is an illusion. They first called out around 10 names: these are people who actually got a job with the company but for a different role from which they applied for so they had to speak to them to confirm whether they were happy with that. Then 5 names were called 30 minutes later which are those who have got the job. Although it was advertised that there were 20 jobs, which everyone was positive about, but then some realised that there are infact two assessment days. Another odd 15 names read out; these are people who have been told YOUR SUCCESSFUL!!!! WE'LL LET YOU KNOW IF THERE'S ANY JOBS FOR YOU!!! In other words these 15 or so are on pareto's books. If there is a substandard sales or even recruitment job, pareto will let these 15 lucky individual know about them OR if they're really lucky, they will let them attend ANOTHER assessment day for a different job. The rest of the 25 or so are told you are unsuccessful, and that's it. Personally not a bad way that they let you know your unsuccessful, but the tragedy is the false hope of thinking that there company is actually worth something is very sad.

    Overall, I would say that ANYONE, who has a day to spare, should apply to ANY job they advertise. Reason being? You get tonnes of experience under your belt. BUT PLEASE BEWARE, applying for a job through this agency is not for the feint-hearted. I'm glad I went.
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    I don't quite understand why Pareto is being portrayed as such a negative waste of time. For anyone who is lucky enough to be selected by them, make sure you do your research and take the assessment day seriously as they are true to their word and will find you employment very quickly. Although long, the day itself was good fun and is a good chance for you to show your skills if you have been struggling to find employment. All of the people who are slating Pareto obviously didn't work hard enough or didn't take the day seriously and are now sour.

    The entire process was quick and easy and is well worth your time.
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    Thanks SamWood, just as all the other accounts created by Pareto's employees. Your written communication follows a similar trend. I'm guessing this is possibly the third or fourth account made. Seems to be a trend of labeling those who's comments which include any ting of negativity as 'sour', or 'not taking it seriously'.

    Well many of the comments I saw before even applying were from successful candidates who confirmed the unprofessional manner in which Pareto operate. Sour? I really doubt anyone would want to give negative comments due to a sour experience (Not a lot to be sour about due to the quality of the recruitment company).

    A lot of successful candidates give the negative sides. When there's any review of Pareto as a whole, for any one positive point given, it is followed by several negatives. It's not because that's the nature of reviews for recruitment companies, its just pareto that have this recurring feedback.
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    I attended a Pareto Law assessment day last month. I was unsuccessful, but still recommend them.

    I think a lot of graduates go into their assessment days not quite sure of how it's going to be, but it's the same as all graduate group interview days; you're competing with a few dozen candidates for a couple of jobs. You're going to be assessed down to the finest details and it's up to you to stand out. If you're introverted, slow to socialise and unassertive, you're unlikely to be right for Pareto's clients. If not, you're unlikely to get through. That, unfortunately, is the reality of graduate assessment centres, and if it's your first time, go with the intention of learning and experiencing it rather than expecting to cruise it.

    For what it's worth, I genuinely thought Pareto did a great job. We attended the center in Chiswick. The representatives I dealt with (Kurtis Ayton, Sam Wright, others I cannot remember but all without exception) acted professionally on the day and did what they could to grant us a platform to show our abilities. We were kept informed, granted one-to-one time with the company and they took our details down should we be unsuccessful but they feel us the right candidates. Lunch was decent; rolls and crisps and all that. Nothing amazing, but not bad for free.

    The feedback they gave us was useful and they were pretty good with timekeeping on our occasion.I've been to assessment centres where i've been kept behind two hours to be grilled by a 28 year-old ******* displaying pantomine levels of boredom. (wouldn't have minded if his acting wasn't as bad) with Pareto, they kept in contact, gave me feedback and seemed to have a genuine interest in me showing my best.

    I didn't get the job (don't go in expecting the job; it's competitive and their clients are power players looking for the real competitiors) but I left feeling like it was worth it, and even had a laugh whilst I was there.Another thanks to Kurtis and Sam and everyone else who hosted the day.

    PS: Be prepared to be fatigued by the end. It's just the nature of graduate interviews.
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    bunch of nobs
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    waste of time
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    mickey mouse company
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    I went to an assessment centre for these guys for a Graduate Scheme job at Edumundson Electrical. I didn't get the job, but don't let what I say make it seem like it's 'sour grapes'. In fact, after the day I'm so glad I didn't!

    First of all here were the problems I experienced. Before the assessment day:

    1. Poor communication. Was asked the same questions repeatedly by different employees of Pareto. Think I had to send them my CV three times. This didn't initially fill me with any confidence in them. Still, I thought I'd persevere....

    2. I was told 'thousands' of graduates don't get through to the assessment day. I have my doubts about the validity of these claims. The psychometric tests were so blatantly easy to pass that I could train my dog to do it.

    3. Bad attitude on the phone from one of their advisor's, Sam. "Lots of people are interested in this job. I could offer a place to somebody else. Would you like me to do that?" Oh sure, go on then, I've been putting up with the repeated questionings as a hobby. The rest of the staff were friendly.

    The day itself:

    1. 40 graduates put into a hot room without working air conditioning. Turned up at 9am and it wasn't done until 7pm. In that time I think I spent no more than 30 minutes actually doing 'stuff'. Unacceptable, and wouldn't happen if they were assessing smaller groups of people. The usual corporate rubbish of "people matter"...yes, unless we can save a few quid and treat you like cattle.

    2. The assessments they undertake are fair enough. But, if you don't get through don't be disheartened - you're just not for them.

    3. Staff were pleasant on the day. We were told to expect feedback within 24 hours...

    However:

    1. The poor communications from Pareto prevail. 72 working hours after the assessment centre and still nothing. I'm not actually interested in what they have to say, but it's the principle. Poorly organised (as ever).

    So, would I do it again? No! Thanks to this assessment centre it made me realise that continuing to work for myself is the right option. It might be worth checking out if you live nearby to an assessment centre, but I really WOULD NOT bother travelling any further than 20 miles. I'm sure you can find an equally decent job with a lot less hassle.

    This isn't a review on Edumundson Electrical. In fact, they could be a great company to work for. However, they really need to think about the methods employed when looking for people.

    And with regards to those people with one post posting positive reviews...doesn't take a genius to work out where they're from!
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    Hi everyone

    I've joined specifically to tell you all about my experiences with Pareto Law. Like you, I'd read all the bad comments regarding the company and was in two minds about going, but ultimately, I'm glad I did.

    I got the call randomly last week from a guy called Nick, saying he'd found my name on Reed. He asked a bit about me and I him. I wasn't really thinking about sales as a career, but my job situation had gotten so desperate I decided I might as well give it a go. He spent the whole time telling me how great a company called UK Fast was to work for, and I had to ask him to tell me what the role actually ensured. He didn't even bother giving me a phone interview, saying I was good enough to go through without it.

    I'm not being funny, but I'm obviously not that great a candidate (I was ultimately unsuccessful), so alarm bells rung. I googled them extensively, and if I'm honest, got mixed results. Nick called me several times and read my prep, giving me pointers and feedback. I was still a little edgy, but never the less, I attended the day at the UK Fast head quarters.

    First, let me tell you that UK Fast boasts the absolute best company building I have ever seen. The place just looks cool, with an outdoor pool, pool tables, a full gym... there was even a fully stocked bar. One thing, though, was that it seemed focused on just how amazing the building was, but less on what job you'd actually be doing. I caught sight of several employees throughout the day, and the CEO, and none of them were what you'd expect - they were all dressed in scruffs. From what I saw, UK Fast would be a fun place to work AT, but I have no idea if it's a good place to work FOR.

    Anyway, we were first packed into a little room with computers and did a quick test. It was a mixture of maths and word problems. I couldn't answer 3 of them (Maths was never my strongest suit, and it's been a while!) however I'm pretty sure of the 27 I did answer I got most of them right. We all were supposed to have a pen and paper to work things out with. I didn't have a pen, whereas others did, and there was nobody to ask without wasting valuable time (the test was timed).

    Then, we went into a larger room. This was a loooong part of the day - we had an extensive speech both from UK Fast and Pareto Law, after waiting 20 minutes for them to get organized. Make sure you ask questions here! They kept on saying that if you didn't get chance to ask then, you would later. We did not. Get stuck in, and get asking from the start! Then, it was our turn. Each of us had to stand up, introduce ourselves, state our greatest achievement and our inspirational person. With there being about 50 graduates in the room, you can imagine how long this took! There were a few people that for some reason where not on Pareto's list, which I thought very poor.

    Next, it was time for the Group tasks. The first was you pretended to be your inspirational person, and you had to debate with others which of their people would get saved on a life raft. This is where I think I failed - I obviously did not contribute enough. Then, it was order important items for surviving in a desert. Ultimately, only one group would have survived - the rest of us died. Again, make sure you contribute here. If making your voice heard is not easy for you, I would seriously consider bothering with the day. I will say that don't worry about other horror stories on here - everyone was nice and friendly. You won't get shot down, and in fact they encourage you not to.

    Finally, it was time for the thing I was dreading the most - the 3 minute Presentation. I was in front of 4 people, and you'd be amazed how quick 3 minutes pass. People kept telling me they had too much to say, and one bloke (who was successful, I might add) told me he ran out of time. I don't think they care what you say - they want to see your personality. Then, it was the 1:1 interview. This was the easiest part by far - I had a very friendly girl from UK Fast, but it was a mixture of Pareto people and them. This was very basic and informal - who you are, when can you start etc.

    The big downside of the day was how long we then had to wait. As said above, UK Fast boasts an incredible building, and if I'm honest, where this not the case, I would be giving this whole process a very different review. I was sat for an hour waiting for them to get a move on. I understand they had 50 people to interview, and then decide who they wanted, but by God was it long. By this point, everyone was knackered and just wanted to get home. I was lucky as I didn't have far to travel, but many others did.

    They eventually came and took two different groups out of the room, before saying to the rest of us we were unsuccessful. So, I spent an hour waiting to be told I wasn't good enough. Why they couldn't have just emailed us this information was utterly beyond me. As far as I know, one group was offered a further interview for UK Fast (passing the day was only stage 1), while the other was offered further assistance from Pareto. I was in the, "yeah, there's nothing we can do for you" camp. When you've spent two years trying to find a decent job, and 7 (yes 7) hours at an assessment day, it's hard not to leave feeling a bit down on yourself, I'll be honest.

    On the whole, I thought the day was.... OK. Not awful, and they organized it well. Ultimately, there were too many people there, and had we not had the awesome UK Fast building to wait around in, I can see how the day would have been a lot worse. I'm not bitter towards them, and from what people were saying on the day, it was the best assessment day they'd been to. Would I recommend it? If you want a career in sales, definitely go if offered, or seek it out. I have no idea what the actual job would have been like, but my assessment was for 19k basic, with OTE of 28-30k. HOWEVER, if you don't want a career in sales, and like me were going out of desperation, I seriously wouldn't bother. It's a long, tiring day, and they'll know if you're seriously out of your comfort zone. They know who they want pretty much from the start, and if you are uncertain which path to take, the only thing you'll get out of the day is the feeling you're not good enough for sales, and that other nagging feeling: what the hell am I going to do now?

    If you think you could do it, then go. It's a good day, and informative. They are not trying to trick you... everyone on my day could have been offered a job (which is kind of what hurts more). But if you've never really looked at sales, then I would advise not bothering. You very probably won't be chosen, and will feel you've kind of wasted your day.Even if successful, it sounded like you're in constant competition, working ungodly hours and under a lot of pressure. It takes a specific person to be a successful salesman. Don't try if you don't feel you're that person.
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    You know they're a company to be avoided when they contact you via email/phone and generally hassle you about an unnamed position that you 'applied for'. I can categorically state that i have never applied to Pareto for a role and would never have done so even in desperate times. I've worked in IT marketing/Sales as a stopgap to pay off my overdraft and i wouldn't go near it again with a barge pole.
    I have been called by member number 1 of their team, the call was not returned as i googled the company and knew i had not applied to a role with them. I was emailed the next day by member number 2, to which i replied that unless they could prove i had applied to leave me alone. I had another missed call and an email from member number 3 this morning on exactly the day i'm supposed to be nailing down my terms for a job i actually applied to with a major pharmaceutical company.
    All these 'i wasn't going to go but my friend told me to etc. ... blah blah blah... but I'm really glad i did' are all uniformly the same and in that respect, unimaginative additions from one time contributors clearly employed by Pareto. While i accept that the company does exist and some people are successful, all the underhand tactics with overfilling the assessment days and claiming theres stiff competition doesn't bode well for its reputation. Add in the extensive waiting around people are quoting and consistently using X factor tactics - surely we graduates know enough to stay away from this like the plague.
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    Hi! Pareto helped me with the preparation of my Assessment Day in London last week. The interview by phone was quite short and I was surprised I passed just by answering just a couple of questions, but I got very motivated by their positive energy and confidence. I travelled from the Netherlands to attend the Assessment Day and I am glad I did. The people at Pareto have been very helpful with questions and doubts I had about the day and the presentation we had to prepare and also during the day they have been very helpful and interested. The program was interesting and I think they did a great job preparing everything for almost 60 people.
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    Hi! Pareto helped me with the preparation of my Assessment Day in London last week. The interview by phone was quite short and I was surprised I passed just by answering just a couple of questions, but I got very motivated by their positive energy and confidence. I travelled from the Netherlands to attend the Assessment Day and I am glad I did. The people at Pareto have been very helpful with questions and doubts I had about the day and the 3 minute presentation we had to prepare and also during the day they have been very helpful and interested. The program was set up well and I think they did a great job preparing everything for almost 60 people. It was also a good experience to meet new people with different stories.
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    I went a few weeks ago and passed the London assessment day. They are a poor company with bad lines of communication. They make up roles to entice you in and then throw your CV out anywhere if you do pass the day. The day itself was absolutely rammed and there were loads of great people not selected. They are really more of a hindrance than a help and you can find better jobs yourself without their help . I will be turning down the jobs I have been offered, least of all because their sales team are annoying and have no interpersonal skills. not worth the train fare to get there...
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    I went through the usual stages (telephone conversation, then telephone interview then onto the assessment centre). I was successful in the assessment centre, something I was very pleased with as it promised such good things. The following day I got a call from my 'mentor' saying that they were so pleased with me that they would like to offer me a role at Pareto following another interview. I made it clear from the start that I was not interested in a recruitment role especially one which involved 'cold calling'. The individual talked around this which made me wary. The interview time and date was changed several times and ultimately ended in it not being in their Glasgow offices (which did not check out) and in a random coffee shop which was located very close to their offices. All conversations from my recruiter who is 'always in Glasgow', the calls come from Macclesfield. Further to this, all emails sent are not acknowledged and all correspondence is through phone calls. As a graduate I am desperate for a role. However, something is not checking out with this company. Anyone with further information, I would be very grateful to be informed if it is a scam that preys on graduates.
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    I can't think why none of the positive "reviews" are by people with a reasonably significant TSR posting history...
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    Hello all,
    Last Monday I submitted my CV to Pareto legal after struggling to find a graduate job (despite having a strong degree in a Science subject from a decent university), I received a call from a 'Graduate Recruitment Manager' who was both helpful and friendly. We had a chat about my wants and needs from a job role and what sort of industry I was looking to work in, after which I was delighted to have found out I'd mate it onto the 'telephone interview stage'. The interview went well, I was provided with a few tips for the upcoming assessment day and was equal parts excited and nervous!

    Immediately decided to Google Pareto law to see if I could get some feedback or tips for the assessment day. Having read the majority of this page I was a) worried and b) well prepared. The guidance given on here was really useful, my assessment day was only minorly different in structure to what a lot of people have mentioned- i.e. crash in the desert rather than stranded on the moon etc. Obviously having seen some of the negative reviews I was a little off-put, but I wasn't going to let it affect my view of the day- what's the worst that could happen right? Just decided to let that take the pressure off the day, rather than diminish my views of it. Anyway I went into the day really confident, put myself forward and thoroughly enjoyed the day. The assessment day whilst more casual than a few I had been on did give every person a chance to showcase their abilities and get their opinions heard. I found that the casual nature of the day brought out a bit more confidence in people, in the past I have seen people crumble on assessment days because it is a shockingly high pressure environment.

    Obviously found out at the end, by the slightly x-factor style reveal that I had been successful. The very next day I was informed that one of the employers on the day had been very impressed with me and was looking to get me in for interview (tomorrow actually so fingers crossed)! The employer in question had come through Pareto Law a number of years ago and is now Director of Sales for a leading company in their field, so that obviously has me optimistic that Pareto do put the right people through and into suitable jobs.

    Before I'm accused of being a Pareto employee or whatever I'd just like to justify this review- I felt compelled to come on and give both sides of the argument, as the reviews on this page could well have put me off even going to the assessment day. Hope this is at least helpful to someone and if anyone has any questions about how I prepared for the day or any thing go ahead.
 
 
 
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