Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by imogen--)
    Is this the right experiment for finding the specific heat capacity of a metal??? Or are we not allowed to presume we know the specific heat capacity of water???

    -Measure the mass of an empty beaker, then fill the beaker with water at room temperature and measure the water's mass (in kg) by subtracting the weight of the beaker

    -Heat a metal in a hot bath or with a heated rod and record its temperature.

    -Record the temperature of the water at room temperature and immediately place the heated metal in the water, submerged.

    -Observe the increasing temperature of the water and record the stabilised temperature.

    -Remove the heated metal, drying it, and weigh it to find its mass in kg.

    Now by knowing the specific heat capacity of water...

    (water) mcT=(metal) mcT
    Got this from a mark scheme:

    labelled diagram (2 marks):
    liquid in vessel with electrical heater (submerged) and thermometer
    B1
    ammeter connected in series between supply and heater AND voltmeter
    connected across heater.
    B1
    Allow use of joule meter if convincingly connected to heater and power supply i.e. 2 wires from power supply two wires to heater

    list of measurements (3 marks):
    mass of liquid,
    B1
    initial and final temperature/change of temp (of the liquid)
    B1
    I, V and t values OR energy meter readings OR power and time
    B1
    Allow such things as “find mass”, “known mass”, “10K temp rise”, “time for 2 minutes” “known power”, etc.

    explanation (1 mark):
    E = mcΔθ rearranged to c = E/mΔθ
    B1
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jullith)
    Besides these experiments (see list below) are there any others they could ask about?

    Oscillation of a loudspeaker cone
    Simple harmonic motion of a spring-trolley system
    Damping experiment with hacksaw blade/stringy metal strip
    Barton's pendulums
    Brownian motion experiment
    Specific heat capacity experiments
    Boyle's law experiment
    Charles' law experiment
    Can you explain your answers for Boyle's Law and Charles' Law please?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kreayshawn)
    do we ever actually have to use
    x = A sin(2pft)
    You use x = Acos(2pif)t for when someone is starting a stopwatch at maximum displacement

    You use x = Asin(2pif)t for when someone is starting a stopwatch at the equilibrium point.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bbcs2k9)
    Got this from a mark scheme:

    labelled diagram (2 marks):
    liquid in vessel with electrical heater (submerged) and thermometer
    B1
    ammeter connected in series between supply and heater AND voltmeter
    connected across heater.
    B1
    Allow use of joule meter if convincingly connected to heater and power supply i.e. 2 wires from power supply two wires to heater

    list of measurements (3 marks):
    mass of liquid,
    B1
    initial and final temperature/change of temp (of the liquid)
    B1
    I, V and t values OR energy meter readings OR power and time
    B1
    Allow such things as “find mass”, “known mass”, “10K temp rise”, “time for 2 minutes” “known power”, etc.

    explanation (1 mark):
    E = mcΔθ rearranged to c = E/mΔθ
    B1
    This is for the specific heat capacity of water, I was wondering about finding out the specific heat capacity of a metal, or is it not necessary to know this? This could have been one of the many things my teacher spent a long time looking at that's not on the syllabus!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bbcs2k9)
    Got this from a mark scheme:

    labelled diagram (2 marks):
    liquid in vessel with electrical heater (submerged) and thermometer
    B1
    ammeter connected in series between supply and heater AND voltmeter
    connected across heater.
    B1
    Allow use of joule meter if convincingly connected to heater and power supply i.e. 2 wires from power supply two wires to heater

    list of measurements (3 marks):
    mass of liquid,
    B1
    initial and final temperature/change of temp (of the liquid)
    B1
    I, V and t values OR energy meter readings OR power and time
    B1
    Allow such things as “find mass”, “known mass”, “10K temp rise”, “time for 2 minutes” “known power”, etc.

    explanation (1 mark):
    E = mcΔθ rearranged to c = E/mΔθ
    B1
    how do we draw the voltmeter and ammeter connected?
    anyone up for drawing the whole thing? having trouble picturing it

    also, is there a definition for radians?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone got the jan 13 ms please?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    When do we need to use angular frequency/speed? any examples of questions?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by imogen--)
    This is for the specific heat capacity of water, I was wondering about finding out the specific heat capacity of a metal, or is it not necessary to know this? This could have been one of the many things my teacher spent a long time looking at that's not on the syllabus!!
    I think it's the same experiment, the only difference is that for water: A coil is submerged in the water to heat it
    Where as for a solid: The heater is placed inside the metal in a whole in the metal.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kreayshawn)
    how do we draw the voltmeter and ammeter connected?
    anyone up for drawing the whole thing? having trouble picturing it

    also, is there a definition for radians?
    Unit of angle or phase difference; 1 radian is angle
    subtended by an arc of the circumference equal to the
    radius; 2π=360o
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by imogen--)
    Can you explain your answers for Boyle's Law and Charles' Law please?
    I drew a diagram for you. Hope it helps.

    Name:  Laws.png
Views: 309
Size:  48.2 KB
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AlexKOP1)
    Anyone got the jan 13 ms please?
    It was posted on the 3 page, 8th post down.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jullith)
    It was posted on the 3 page, 8th post down.
    Thanks!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    CAN ANYONE CHECK PLEASE:
    jan 2013 paper Q2bii

    EDIT:can anyone explain it lol? I didn't get how they got 6.7
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    1W = 1W per second or 1W per hour?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Blonde moment;
    Why is the net force on on a spring NOT equal to it's weight?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stickyelmo)
    1W = 1W per second or 1W per hour?
    Mate 1W = 1W, it doesn't equal 1W per second and it doesn't equal 1W per hour.
    But 1W = 1J per second.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by eggfriedrice)
    Blonde moment;
    Why is the net force on on a spring NOT equal to it's weight?
    lol
    that aint a question...
    The real question is why would it be equal?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I know potential energy increases with state change at constant temperature, but does it change with changing temp too?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IndyJK9)
    Hi, I know potential energy increases with state change at constant temperature, but does it change with changing temp too?
    a little bit increase with temp increase because the material/object will start expanding a little.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Namod)
    a little bit increase with temp increase because the material/object will start expanding a little.
    Ok, thanks, because my text book said no, but exam paper said yes.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.