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    Some people do poorly at exams because they cannot do them well. Period. That results in ****ty grade. However, you have an opportunity to shine. Where are your apps, software you built during university? Truly passionate programmers don't just do coursework and then have fun all the other time. Have you tried applying for every internship after 1, 2 years? Also, there are aspiring programmers who show commitment and get some work at IT firms part-time. If you did not do this and not gained experience then of course no one is going to take you. Add the poor degree and the opportunities are limited.(yet if I were an employer, I would not consider 2:2 or even 3rd as a bad grade. There are phone interviews to filter bad hires. ).

    As an example, my close friend graduated from university with low grade because all the time and effort was spent working for a company with experienced guys making top product. Now he's senior developer after two years at the company after university. Is he idiot because his grade is low? No. He saw an opportunity which yielded results.
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    I got a job regardless of my 2.2 now =D It's bloody hard but it's possible
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    That's good, are you happy with it or a short term solution?

    Back to the original point, I must be in a minority. I dropped out of university only to return a couple years later, to a university ranked lower. At the time I didn't think it would really make a difference, but I'm sure it does. So what I'm saying is, I went to a lower ranked uni and I would tend to agree with OP.

    I am set to graduate with a first, however I do not believe it is on par with a highly ranked computer science university. As someone else mentioned UCAS points are quite frequently used which are probably not going to be a factor for someone attending a higher ranked university. So I would say, **** rolls down hill. My point is, my course had a lot of people who struggled and they were not difficult or bleeding edge modules, their limiting factor will be lack of UCAS points.

    Now that doesn't help someone with a 2:2, however, it should allow you to attempt to sell yourself. For example if your course is considerably more difficult you could indicate certain modules and what you produced on your CV, or link to projects on LinkedIn - which is becoming increasingly popular to gain employment.

    I'd be surprised if your university did not count against you or help you; there was a time when job applications would state 'Russell group'. More recently I have seen "top 20 red-brick university". So while it may not be used at the initial stages, it may do later.

    There are definitely flaws in the entire system, but they've been there for some time and will continue. If you attend a university who has a particularly strict and unforgiving classification system, you may worry about a 2:1. Likewise you could attend a modern university making a name for itself in your field, gain a 2:1 or first, but your lack of UCAS points (which caused you to attend such a university) will also prevent you from gaining employment - to an extent.

    Though I only really think a 2:2 is problem for the large graduate schemes where you're competing with students from all across the UK and possibly further.
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    I'm resurrecting this old long dead thread just to sort of tie up some loose ends. And hopefully give some of you new grads who were in the same position as me; some sort of feedback/advice as how things all turned out.

    Feedback
    1) It turned out for the better
    2) Things turned out arguably for the better - the grades I got didn't allow me to join one of those big sparkly grad schemes. Instead I ended up joining an SME. I stayed there for about a year where I learnt phenomenal amounts. The company was going places, but I really disliked the company culture there. I put my CV (updated with all my new experience) online, only to get a call from one of the software big boys (no names mentioned but they're big and blue). I've since been promoted twice within the org and am doing really well for myself. Salary wise I'm on around double/triple that of what many people who joined the grad schemes with.

    Advice
    1) Hone in on your soft skills! This is something I took for granted and didn't see as useful. Turns out, they're invaluable especially in IT where the majority of technical people don't possess massive amounts of them. I recommend reading Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds. This will help you at interviews and when you start your job.

    2) Take ANY job related to your field and use it to learn everything you possible can! I mean any job - even if it does sound super mundane and beneath you. As long as you can relate it back to your studies, you're golden. Personally my first job was in Dev ops, it wasn't something I'd ever planned on going into or even a role I really knew existed! But I learnt everything I could about it while I was there. Regularly I was doing 11/12 hours a day just to learn everything I could.

    3) The traditional thinking is 'aim for something then do everything you can to do to achieve it'. Although I agree it works, the sad matter of reality is that very few people know what they want to do. Especially when you've scored a 2.2 like I did - you start to question things like whether academia or even IT is the right choice. So my advice to you is to talk to everyone in in every department in the company and really try to grasp what they do. Once you do that you'll find yourself in a far better position to make decisions.

    Any new grads in the same position as I was (just missed out on a 2.1 from a Russel Group, and was finding myself not making cut offs) please feel free to shoot me a message.

    (Original post by beerbaitedballs)
    That's good, are you happy with it or a short term solution?

    Back to the original point, I must be in a minority. I dropped out of university only to return a couple years later, to a university ranked lower. At the time I didn't think it would really make a difference, but I'm sure it does. So what I'm saying is, I went to a lower ranked uni and I would tend to agree with OP.

    I am set to graduate with a first, however I do not believe it is on par with a highly ranked computer science university. As someone else mentioned UCAS points are quite frequently used which are probably not going to be a factor for someone attending a higher ranked university. So I would say, **** rolls down hill. My point is, my course had a lot of people who struggled and they were not difficult or bleeding edge modules, their limiting factor will be lack of UCAS points.

    Now that doesn't help someone with a 2:2, however, it should allow you to attempt to sell yourself. For example if your course is considerably more difficult you could indicate certain modules and what you produced on your CV, or link to projects on LinkedIn - which is becoming increasingly popular to gain employment.

    I'd be surprised if your university did not count against you or help you; there was a time when job applications would state 'Russell group'. More recently I have seen "top 20 red-brick university". So while it may not be used at the initial stages, it may do later.

    There are definitely flaws in the entire system, but they've been there for some time and will continue. If you attend a university who has a particularly strict and unforgiving classification system, you may worry about a 2:1. Likewise you could attend a modern university making a name for itself in your field, gain a 2:1 or first, but your lack of UCAS points (which caused you to attend such a university) will also prevent you from gaining employment - to an extent.

    Though I only really think a 2:2 is problem for the large graduate schemes where you're competing with students from all across the UK and possibly further.
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    People on here, who in many cases haven't even been to university, make out a 2.2 is the end of the world. Glad to see some more evidence that this is NOT the case. I know a few people from my uni who ended up with 2.2s and let's run through where they are now 1/2 years after graduating...

    - Completed a professional industry qualification to mask his degree result. Now a Financial Analyst in the city earning 35k.
    - Graduate Coder for an IT company earning somewhere in the late 20s
    - Data analyst for an FMCG company earning 26k

    Most graduate schemes require a 2.1 but what people neglect to mention is that hardly anyone gets on a graduate scheme. Lots of other decent quality jobs out there who aren't so fussy on grades.
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    You're totally right - I mean don't get me wrong. Moment the topic of university grades comes up in the workplace I do quickly become very sheepish.

    However it really isn't that bad. I'm now a solutions architect earning in 50k+ bracket.

    In a strange way, the 2.2 is an advantage as it forces you to gain a better scope of what's out there instead of doing what I was planning on doing before; which was to simply seen as the best thing to do by my parents and by my friends.

    Put it this way, if I'd got a 2.1 I would have most likely ended up at a big tech company as a junior developer. I would have most likely done that for 2 years, not particularly enjoyed it; but endured it. After that I may have just continued on, or I may have shifted positions. Chances are though I wouldn't have learnt anywhere near the amount I've learnt now, nor would I be doing something I love as I am now.

    (Original post by sr90)
    People on here, who in many cases haven't even been to university, make out a 2.2 is the end of the world. Glad to see some more evidence that this is NOT the case. I know a few people from my uni who ended up with 2.2s and let's run through where they are now 1/2 years after graduating...

    - Completed a professional industry qualification to mask his degree result. Now a Financial Analyst in the city earning 35k.
    - Graduate Coder for an IT company earning somewhere in the late 20s
    - Data analyst for an FMCG company earning 26k

    Most graduate schemes require a 2.1 but what people neglect to mention is that hardly anyone gets on a graduate scheme. Lots of other decent quality jobs out there who aren't so fussy on grades.
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    This is my first post on TSR for four years, since I started university and I graduated in July. This may not be the most ethical suggestion (and it is fortunately not something I need to do) but whats really stopping you from saying you got a 2.1 on your CV even if you didn't? From my experience, and that of other people I know, a lot of employers don't even bother checking.
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    (Original post by MasterSnake)
    You're totally right - I mean don't get me wrong. Moment the topic of university grades comes up in the workplace I do quickly become very sheepish.

    However it really isn't that bad. I'm now a solutions architect earning in 50k+ bracket.

    In a strange way, the 2.2 is an advantage as it forces you to gain a better scope of what's out there instead of doing what I was planning on doing before; which was to simply seen as the best thing to do by my parents and by my friends.

    Put it this way, if I'd got a 2.1 I would have most likely ended up at a big tech company as a junior developer. I would have most likely done that for 2 years, not particularly enjoyed it; but endured it. After that I may have just continued on, or I may have shifted positions. Chances are though I wouldn't have learnt anywhere near the amount I've learnt now, nor would I be doing something I love as I am now.
    When did you start working? Last year?
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    (Original post by MasterSnake)
    Hello all,

    I go to the University of Nottingham and am about to complete my BSc (hons) Computer Science. However I'm probably going to get a 2.2 from the looks of things.

    I've looked around at jobs and it's really rather ridiculous. Companies don't seem to care what uni you're from, as long as you have a 2.1.

    I just don't understand this though- for instance I have a couple of friends who go to two much lower ranked universities than myself and are probably going to achieve their 2.1 in the same course. However throughout their standard of work has simply been easier.

    In fact I helped them a lot through their studies, not to mention it just doesn't make statistical sense. Considering unis all use averaging systems to state their grade boundaries, our which has much higher entry requirements than theirs will inevitably have higher boundaries no?

    I'd understand if there was a standardised measure of testing like A-levels where we all sit the same paper. However the grades are all rather arbitrary- so much so that I've had a lecturer tell me that they generally just look a bit of work, and give it a grade depending on their personal judgement. It's not as if there's even a rigid mark scheme.

    =======================

    On a side note, now that I am doomed with a 2.2, anybody know where I should go from here? It seems most of the large companies are out of the question, any recommendations?
    Would you consider taking a relevant Master's degree? Postgraduate studies may be able to compensate your underperformance during your BSc.
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    I'm currently looking for 2 enthusiastic developers (iOS and Android) for my startup (funded, part of Telefonica). We provide software for the broadcasters for personalised live video streaming. Message me if you are interested.
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    (Original post by honour)
    Would you consider taking a relevant Master's degree? Postgraduate studies may be able to compensate your underperformance during your BSc.
    What top unis take 2.2? I read normally a 2.1 is in order
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    (Original post by TrojanH)
    What top unis take 2.2? I read normally a 2.1 is in order
    To be honest, you can't expect to do a postgraduate course at a top university with a 2.2...
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    (Original post by honour)
    To be honest, you can't expect to do a postgraduate course at a top university with a 2.2...
    Exactly. Someone said an underperforming BSc could be masked with a good post grad but it wouldn't happen.
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    Well it does make one think what have you been doing with those 3 years of your life
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    Be creative, develop projects, websites, apps, video games and put these onto GitHub and I'm sure their will be interview offers knocking. Develop these in C#, Java, JavaScript, Python C++ etc. There are also many jobs in PHP, SQL, Django. Also as stated in another thread, knowledge of AngularJS, NodeJS, JQuery will help a lot.

    If you enjoy networking, take a CCNA course and purchase a home lab to work with the equipment to gain some experience and try volunteering as a network admin which could lead you to being a network engineer.
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    Doesn't mean you're doomed imo, just means you're young.

    Glad it worked out for the OP in the end.

    Personally, I have a 2:1 from UCL but my stock's plummeted since. Long story, but the classification means nothing two years down the line.
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    (Original post by TrojanH)
    Exactly. Someone said an underperforming BSc could be masked with a good post grad but it wouldn't happen.
    Well, if you try extra hard and put in lots of effort, you can still get a postgraduate grade e.g. Pass, Merit, Distinction. It does't necessarily have to be in a good university though.
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    DONT QUOTE please

    I went to an middling Ivy league university in the US (ex, Brown, Columbia etc)
    I have a 2:2 based on my official transcript (but I have a lot of condoned grades...which is standard policy to do so -- so taking all grades into account my grades may be PASS based on UK standards)

    I am an international student and could not get into consulting/banking in the US during the height of the recession (2011)

    But

    - I got a job at home at the central bank ( a few leniencies because the governor at the time LOVED me)
    - Three years later I got a job at JP Morgan front office (although at home)
    - Two years later I got into the MSc Econ at Warwick (applying at the last moment!) and an interview at INSEAD
    - A year later my CV was paased by McKinsey for an associate position

    But

    I'm failing my masters again


    Moral of the story : you never know what will happen.
    PS My parents are not super-rich privliedged or whatever.
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    Get a GitHub account and start putting in high quality projects.

    If you're looking to get into:

    Java (build android apps, web apps, software)
    C# (software, video games, web apps)
    JavaScript (web apps in node, angular, react)

    EDIT: I'm glad it worked it well
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    Hate to revive this thread (again) that I started back in 2013 during a very depressing time of my life, but I've had a lot of emails about the topic over the summer and I thought it would be an idea to pass on all my wisdom.

    Getting a 2:2 sucks. It really does! No matter what everyone says, it is forever a stain on your CV. Even with all the success I've had career wise, I still get very sheepish during any discussion to do with university.

    However with a bit of luck and the right strategy you can power straight through. I've managed to turn my graduate 2.2 sob story into a huge success. I'm now 25, working for one of the biggest tech companies in the world and have a salary of £70K+ bonuses. I'm also currently in the midst purchasing my second flat. It seems totally unattainable, and what I'm about to tell you, isn't an exact science, but it's worked really well for me.


    1) If you're like me, and you did go to a Russel Group university, direct the conversation of the interview towards your experience there and how competitive it was.

    If you read back earlier in the thread, I was moaning about the disparity of the 2.1 itself across different universities. I had some resistance from 1 person who seemed to have a chip on their shoulder about having gone to a lower ranked university and insisted that universities are standardised (lol), however the general consensus agreed; that yes, due to how unis utilise normal distribution curves to weight their results. Those institutions who had higher entrance requirements will inevitably have smarter people, so when they do apply the curve, it's going to make it harder at higher ranked universities, and easier at lower ranked universities.

    Use this as a way of differentiating yourself. A statement; not slandering other universities, but more so just reaffirming how fierce the competition can be at a prestigious institution can often remind employers that not all 2.2's are made equal, and they should dive a bit deeper.


    2) Find a marketable niche. Sounds cliche I know. However education doesn't teach you how you can differentiate yourself with a marketable skill. It more so provides a foundation of skills as a whole. That's why getting a graduate job isn't the easiest thing.

    Sure you understand how ARM instruction sets work (if you're a comp sci grad like me), but honestly how many attainable jobs need that skill?

    Look at market trends for jobs and start investing in some training. For instance, I have a close friend who studied a humanity, so his career was somewhat in a state of flux upon graduating. He did the above and saw how large the market was for technology project managers. Despite only being a technology hobbyist, he went off, and enrolled in a PRINCE 2 course. A few months later, he'd landed that junior project manager role.


    3) Become an interview beast. Just take every interview for everything and anything you can. Personally I'm rather extroverted which for a comp sci grad is rare, and I literally did 1 interview and got 1 job. However I have plenty of friends who went from being absolute chocolate teapots in interview situations, to something far more desirable.

    The reason I say this, is because 2.2's are just an arbitrary filter, and will mean you can't apply to 75% of the jobs you want to apply to. All it means is that you have to make an extra effort and smash those that give you a chance.


    4) Panic! Everyone says "keep calm", and "it's not the end of the world". It's rubbish.

    You need to put in way more effort at this point than anyone else (except maybe those with a 3rd) in getting your career kickstarted.

    Apply everywhere for everything. I mean literally everything even mildly related. I remember I applied for around 30 borderline attainable jobs and got 1 interview! (I had another interview offered to me a few months later, but I'd already secured the first job by now).

    Use recruiters, use a linkedin network if you have one, use family connections if you have any. At this point I'd shut myself off from the outside world when everyone else was doing grad ball etc. I was trawling technology company websites, looking for a contact us or careers link and getting my application well underway.

    Failing all of that - register your own company (good experience as a whole), and start marketing your skills, be it web development, graphic design, or anything else that you feel would be at all useful.

    This will keep you busy (i.e. stopping you getting depressed), help you make some potentially useful contacts alongside filling a blank in your CV.


    I think those are my last words of wisdom on the topic.

    I really do hope I've helped, because that 2.2 was honestly was the worst feeling I've ever felt. I felt so defeated at first, and just wanted to cry in my bed all day looking back on the happy days of getting my A-level results and having the world at my feet. To now being down at the bottom of the pile of CV's.

    It's a tough pill to swallow, but it's NOT hopeless. You can go back to being a high flyer. It's just going to involve you taking the hard route.
 
 
 
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