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    Does anyone know if either quakes were predicted?
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    (Original post by Gary)
    Only thing I'm stuck on at the moment is what they can potentially ask about item 3 and figure p8, not sure what to do with them


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    Hey I'm not sure if this is going to be much help but for figure p8 I think they might ask a question along the lines of 'Comment on the pattern shown in figure p8, and state how this pattern might influence future planning for seismic events in New Zealand' I said: Overall the general pattern shows a movement of seismic activity from west to east, and that the earthquakes are clustered around the Greendale fault and the sub surface fault rupture, with the odd few earthquakes being located in seemingly random positions (these ones tend to be of lower magnitude). Unexpectedly there tends not to be many earthquakes located near the active faults, and the ones that are located there do not reach a magnitude greater than 5. If the earthquakes follows the pattern shown in figure p8, then Christchurch will need to plan for the likelihood of a tsunami, they could do this through the use of barricades etc. Also as the earthquakes tend to be clustered around the fault line, they could predict the rough location of potential future earthquakes or at least the region. By doing this they could create seismic zones e.g. stricter building regulations, special emergency units set up, training and practice for evacuations. Hope this helped slightly
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    Having looked at the AQA A2 Geography Text Book partly written by Chief Examiner, David Redfern, in the 4B section at the back of the book there is no mention at all of any statistical tests... It is only mentioned in the 4A section and therefore presumably it cannot come up?
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    If you look at the AQA Geography specification for 4B, it doesn't directly mention statistical tests. However the unit requires "the development of the range of geographical skills" whilst it goes on to mention "candidates must interpret a range of data". So basically I don't think they will directly ask you about statistical tests however it may be something the examiners are looking for in your answers to gain you top marks.
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    (Original post by gooby)
    These give some good answers: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...8084958AACiu3p
    Just got this, thanks very much!
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    (Original post by Chyavan)
    If you look at the AQA Geography specification for 4B, it doesn't directly mention statistical tests. However the unit requires "the development of the range of geographical skills" whilst it goes on to mention "candidates must interpret a range of data". So basically I don't think they will directly ask you about statistical tests however it may be something the examiners are looking for in your answers to gain you top marks.
    No harm in quoting statistical tests, but I don't think we'll have to lay it out fully as our answers are supposed to be in continuous prose.
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    How would anyone answer the questions "should people continue to live in these earthquake prone areas?" Im succkkk thanks
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    (Original post by Hels24)
    Does anyone know if either quakes were predicted?

    Earthquakes cannot be predicted, there are ways of measuring the movement of the earth etc, but you can never be sure when an earthquake will happen
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2rhlhdZXbc This is a video on the ring of fire where New Zealand lies by the BBC if anyone wants background information
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    They give us a link of some photos that show the impacts of the earthquake so i was thinking they could ask us something like the structured 7 markers in the unit 3 exam maybe? and you can talk about mercalli scale, how its measured using observations of the events (e.g. reports and photos)
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    (Original post by alicejackson95)
    How would anyone answer the questions "should people continue to live in these earthquake prone areas?" Im succkkk thanks
    You need to answer this using your own opinion and backed up by evidence you have learnt from the AIB and extensive research. You need to apply it to Christchurch and on a global scale.
    From the second link on the back of the AIB you can see Earthquakes in Christchurch happen on average 3 times a day although very few are felt. After the Christchurch quake a dangerous fault has been found directly below the city, however the effects of the quake may mean they will be more prepared in the future. Most of the old unstable buildings are now destroyed and the new strict building code, makes the use of URM (unreinforced masonry) limited. There has been large emphasis on the Get Ready Get Thru scheme, preparing those in NZ for future quakes. In a world of rapid population growth and urbanization, is it really possible for people not to live in earthquake prone areas? Although does the economic cost of NDs outway the benefit of people living in these areas. Maybe it's acceptable in MEDCs as they can prepare and plan for earthquakes, however in LEDCs they have no preparation and planning and are often forced to live in these areas resulting in high consequences (Haiti). Considering Tsunami's too, in an area prone to both is it really worth the risk, hence 15000 deaths in Japan and a huge economic cost of rebuilding....
    Lots to write about, just bring everything together and make your opinion clear at the end.
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    does anyone think we'll have to apply chi squared anywhere? if so how is it different from/ why would you use it instead of spearman's rank? frantically learning all the statistical tests last minute!
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    Apprently you don't need to do 'too much' background research , and that all the answers are provided within the AIB to give candidates a fair chance
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    (Original post by Hels24)
    Does anyone know if either quakes were predicted?
    Earthquakes, in general, cannot be predicted. Areas in which they may strike can be predicted, but this is pretty basic, as by mapping major earthquakes, we discovered fault lines, so we can say that anywhere near a fault line is pretty much where an earthquake can strike. For example, if you try to snap a pencil, you will pull down on either side really hard, but you have no idea it will snap until it does. It's the same principle with earthquakes. Pressure builds up in the plates, but it is near impossible to tell when the plate will fault and when the energy from this build up pressure will be released. Therefore I can say with great certainty that no, neither of these earthquake can be or were predicted. However, mitigation strategies such as building codes and structure and planning techniques can help prevent the disasters that usually occur, or at least minimise them.
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    (Original post by alibaxter)
    does anyone think we'll have to apply chi squared anywhere? if so how is it different from/ why would you use it instead of spearman's rank? frantically learning all the statistical tests last minute!
    Try one of each of Pearson's and Spearman's, they're both pretty simple and easy to do on excel. They both show correlation, and you'll probably be asked about two contrasting techniques. I think Chi squared is for data sets of three or more variables, so I don't think it would be much help.
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    Can anyone explain the pattern that figure P4 shows?
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    (Original post by alicejackson95)
    Can anyone explain the pattern that figure P4 shows?
    I'm not to sure however it's has a weak positive correlation with figure P3.
    And if you cut figure P4 in half and worked out the mean for each half, i think you would find the second half is higher, so you could argue over time seismic energy release has increased.
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    (Original post by Chyavan)
    I'm not to sure however it's has a weak positive correlation with figure P3.
    And if you cut figure P4 in half and worked out the mean for each half, i think you would find the second half is higher, so you could argue over time seismic energy release has increased.
    Thankyou so much! thats been really help!! I dont suppose you happen to know why on earth they have included the emails? I dont understand what im supposed to gain from reading them or what theyre supposed to show?
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    Can anyone explain what Item 5 is supposed to be showing / saying? And what I would use it for / write about it in tomorrows exam? Thanks x
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    (Original post by alicejackson95)
    Thankyou so much! thats been really help!! I dont suppose you happen to know why on earth they have included the emails? I dont understand what im supposed to gain from reading them or what theyre supposed to show?
    I think they emails are a lead on to a question on Human responses and impacts, and possibly as mentioned earlier whether people should live in earthquake prone areas.
 
 
 
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