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    I made some notes when I learnt C3 last year that you can use. feel free to let friends use them if you need to, as long as you don't take credit for them yourself

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bw9d...it?usp=sharing

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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    Yup pretty much, you can easily memorise these triangles now and the examiner should reward you some marks for computing them without a calculator (on a question that says without a calculator)
    Ah thanks

    Ps can you help me on this?

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9#post43616079
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    There is no requirement to "memorise" just to understand
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    it ain't relevant to the real world.

    where am i gonna use it after the exam?
    There's always one.
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    (Original post by LeeMrLee)
    I made some notes when I learnt C3 last year that you can use. feel free to let friends use them if you need to, as long as you don't take credit for them yourself

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bw9d...it?usp=sharing

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    link doesnt work it says loading and is frozen
    Are you sure its all correct?

    But thanks anyway!
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    (Original post by Blueray2)
    link doesnt work it says loading and is frozen
    Are you sure its all correct?

    But thanks anyway!
    that's weird I'll put it on my drop box and share the link, hang on

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    (Original post by LeeMrLee)
    that's weird I'll put it on my drop box and share the link, hang on

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    thanks cant wait
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    (Original post by LeeMrLee)
    that's weird I'll put it on my drop box and share the link, hang on

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    ?? Or mediafire?
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    (Original post by Liamnut)
    Tell me more about percentages so I can analyse. I would expect the same proportion if not more people to get A/A* in further maths as they're "geniuses". I don't know if you agree with the person I quoted, but he was suggesting that A-levels do not challange top level candiates, that's why I suggested STEP, you've only confirmed that STEP will be a challange. There are PLENTY of resources online, examsoultions, hegartymaths, intergralcalgirl and maths247 who has posted in this thread as well as various textbooks which students can use to try and learn the STEP content.

    Also grade standardization is useless, after all, it suggests general studies is one of the hardest A levels.
    Rough (not entirely sure) percentages for A/A*: 40% M, 65% FM, 90% AFM.

    When I said "geniuses", I meant as in people neither of us have likely ever met (even on here), as I was using an extreme example.

    Well, STEP is actually a strange one. It is not incomprehensibly difficult. It is an incredible achievement to be able to reach the point where you are comfortable with certain topics, but it is, by no means, rare for students to find questions in their favourite topic areas rather straightforward (though nerves can still mean it is easier said than done!)

    Actually I will have to disagree with you there. The grades are intended to be standardised across difficulty rather than students performance (i.e. they do not always intend to meet 'quotas'). Low grades in General studies suggest that weaker candidates sit the exam whilst high grades in AFM (as above) suggest that stronger students sit the exam. Clearly AFM is much harder than general studies but it is still going to be roughly as hard to achieve the creation grades. That said, general studies is a bad example as it is regarded by unis to be the only exception to this rule.
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    Rough (not entirely sure) percentages for A/A*: 40% M, 65% FM, 90% AFM.

    When I said "geniuses", I meant as in people neither of us have likely ever met (even on here), as I was using an extreme example.

    Well, STEP is actually a strange one. It is not incomprehensibly difficult. It is an incredible achievement to be able to reach the point where you are comfortable with certain topics, but it is, by no means, rare for students to find questions in their favourite topic areas rather straightforward (though nerves can still mean it is easier said than done!)

    Actually I will have to disagree with you there. The grades are intended to be standardised across difficulty rather than students performance (i.e. they do not always intend to meet 'quotas'). Low grades in General studies suggest that weaker candidates sit the exam whilst high grades in AFM (as above) suggest that stronger students sit the exam. Clearly AFM is much harder than general studies but it is still going to be roughly as hard to achieve the creation grades. That said, general studies is a bad example as it is regarded by unis to be the only exception to this rule.
    I'm not saying they should ensure equal proportions of people get A/A*'s in all A-level topics, I'm saying the students who sit further maths are A LOT brighter than the majority of students who sit maths and thus, a higher proportion of them are likely to get A/A*'s. If I'm honest, I don't really follow your argument so I might not reply to your next comment if I don't understand it.
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    (Original post by Blueray2)
    ?? Or mediafire?
    drop box is easier for me cause its on my phone sorry for the wait xD if this doesn't work, I give up...

    http://db.tt/EPoYSQgu

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    (Original post by LeeMrLee)
    drop box is easier for me cause its on my phone sorry for the wait xD if this doesn't work, I give up...

    http://db.tt/EPoYSQgu

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    Works
    THanks!
    I don't understand whats going on since im still doing functions atm :lol:
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    (Original post by the bear)
    Young people have no difficulty memorizing hundreds of "pop" songs... so why can't they learn a dozen or so trig relationships ???
    Because you have to remember like 100 equations anyway, thats fine if you were just studying trig and trig alone.
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    (Original post by Liamnut)
    I'm not saying they should ensure equal proportions of people get A/A*'s in all A-level topics, I'm saying the students who sit further maths are A LOT brighter than the majority of students who sit maths and thus, a higher proportion of them are likely to get A/A*'s. If I'm honest, I don't really follow your argument so I might not reply to your next comment if I don't understand it.
    Agreed, which explains the higher proportions of A*s (though also unfortunately suggests that the so-called 'further' A-levels are not of adequate difficulty).

    Sorry man, I do often tend to go on rants from time to time! Which part was hard to follow/ambiguous? :P
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    (Original post by Blueray2)
    Works
    THanks!
    I don't understand whats going on since im still doing functions atm :lol:
    no problem! haha it'll come in useful though I started with the C2 stuff and built on that basically where I could, I also tried to show how to derive some of them (so you only need to remember one and then can work the others out) and I colour coded them to show how to remember them (I'm lazy so the less to remember, the better)

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    its easier to learnt the patterns and how to derive them in my opinion, that's the "smart" way to memorise them otherwise it can get confusing

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    I had huge battles with my teachers about this. Remembering trig exact values is utterly pointless. I timed it and it took me six seconds to calculate sin(30) with my scientific calculator. By memorizing it I save 5 seconds, so what? Besides there are equations in existence that enable you to work out some trig values without a calculator. A double reason for not memorizing them all.





    Try it with cos(pi), cos(pi/2), cos(pi/8) etc.
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    (Original post by jamiep151)
    2 Simple triangles were taught to me by my teacher to have all the identities.

    1) A 1 by 1 square cut diagonally down the middle giving a triangle with a right angle and 2 45 degree angles, 2 sides length 1 and a hypotenuses length root 2. This gives you sin, cos and tan 45 using SOHCAHTOA

    2) An equilateral triangle with sides length 2 cut down the middle leaving a triangle with a right angle, a 30 degree angle and a 60 degree angle, 1 side length 1 1 side length root 3 and a hypotenuses length 2. This gives you sin, cos and tan 30 and 60 using SOHCAHTOA

    I quickly and roughly (ie not to scale just so I could see them) sketched these triangles on every single question where I was required to use an identity for every A level Maths and Further Maths paper that I did.
    I thought you were allowed a calculator in FM?
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    (Original post by Namige)
    You would rather they learn horse grooming, some ICT level 2 diploma or Media Studies etc. rather than an easier A level Maths?
    I'd rather them learn anything else or nothing than 'learn' an easier A level maths.

    An A level maths made easier would mean more people unsuitable for maths not actually being taught any maths, but being 'taught' step by step how to move letters in pre-set sequences. Who benefits?

    It's already facile.
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    (Original post by peter12345)
    I had huge battles with my teachers about this. Remembering trig exact values is utterly pointless. I timed it and it took me six seconds to calculate sin(30) with my scientific calculator. By memorizing it I save 5 seconds, so what? Besides there are equations in existence that enable you to work out some trig values without a calculator. A double reason for not memorizing them all.
    You don't do it to save time, although that it is a nice benefit of it. You do it to improve your understanding and confidence with the material.

    Trigonometry can seem very algebraic, daunting and far removed from the study of right angled triangles. However, knowing a few exact values and formulae by heart and, importantly, where they come from helps overcome all that.

    edit: Where does that formula for cosine come from?
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    I don't make an effort to memorise things, I just pick it up as I go along

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