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Why aren't murder ''jokes'' as bad or worse than rape ones? Watch

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    (Original post by Observatory)
    There's no problem at all. I entirely agree people can be influenced by language. So what?
    Reply to my text or don't reply again, please.

    Firstly and as just stated, influence is an indeterminate concept inclusive of trivial and absolute causal determination, making your repeated attempts to collapse my arguments into mere influence vacuous. Secondly and as just demonstrated, it is not merely influencing.

    (Original post by Observatory)
    You did so here, specifically highlighting the reference to Cllr Driver in bold.
    The thread concerns why rape jokes are increasingly treated as more problematic than murder jokes. You said 'This is a new phenomenon...I've got to agree with Cllr Driver that this modern phenomenon is unusual, if not downright creepy". I responded that it wasn't unusual, but the natural culmination of the shape of philosophy and social theory in the twentieth-century.

    My arguments were never directed at Cllr Driver - who, as stated, I know nothing about - but with your belief that popular reaction against utterances normalising rape (the subject of the thread) was an unusual phenomenon.

    When I stated that our "discussion arose in response to your claim that criticism of the normalisation of rape was 'unusual'", I was referencing your claim that the subject of this thread - the claimed normalisation of rape and how this should or shouldn't effect language use - was a new and unusual phenomenon.
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    (Original post by Misovlogos)
    Reply to my text or don't reply again, please.

    Firstly and as just stated, influence is an indeterminate concept inclusive of trivial and absolute causal determination, making your repeated attempts to collapse my arguments into mere influence vacuous. Secondly and as just demonstrated, it is not merely influencing.
    In what important aspect does it differ?

    The thread concerns why rape jokes are increasingly treated as more problematic than murder jokes. You said 'This is a new phenomenon...I've got to agree with Cllr Driver that this modern phenomenon is unusual, if not downright creepy". I responded that it wasn't unusual, but the natural culmination of the shape of philosophy and social theory in the twentieth-century.

    My arguments were never directed at Cllr Driver - who, as stated, I know nothing about - but with your belief that popular reaction against utterances normalising rape (the subject of the thread) was an unusual phenomenon.

    When I stated that our "discussion arose in response to your claim that criticism of the normalisation of rape was 'unusual'", I was referencing your claim that the subject of this thread - the claimed normalisation of rape and how this should or shouldn't effect language use - was a new and unusual phenomenon.
    The topic of the thread is why rape jokes are considered worse than murder jokes. It isn't unusual not to consider rape "normal", but most people don't consider murder normal either. When people hear jokes about murder it is understood that the speaker is not actually in favour of legalising murder, or even doesn't think it's a grossly immoral thing to do.

    Despite the backpeddling, you haven't escaped the need to defend the belief that rape jokes - even where it is clear, as in Cllr Driver's case, that rape is not actually being endorsed - are sufficiently threatening to society to justify persecuting peaceable speakers.
 
 
 
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