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Did you go to private school? watch

  • View Poll Results: Did you go to private school?
    Yes I went to private school
    118
    39.07%
    No I went to a state school
    184
    60.93%

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    Nope but I would've if my parents could afford it
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    Don't you mean 'Public School' ?
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    (Original post by Robertus)
    Nope. I've deeply regretted my decision in recent years, mostly as I began to realise that those at decent private/grammar schools usually didn't experience the vulgar atmosphere and brutishness of my state comprehensive.

    That's not to say my school is bad though. I'd definitely say my mother picked the best state school in my area when I was 11, and it's improved since then. But as of late I've begun to resent the very lazy attitude and lack of opportunities at my school compared to the local independent ones.
    I'm very against selective schooling but I completely understand the vulgarity of state schools (and I also went to the 'best' one in my area) and would definitely go to a private school if I had a choice (but ultimately my parents are poor and it wasn't my choice at all). I reckon I picked up some mental illnesses from my state comp. If I hadn't gone to one I doubt I'd be the socially anxious billy-no-mates failure I am today.

    However, I think the educational advantage selective schools place on people is way, way too high. 95% of the time you can easily tell whether someone went to a selective school or not; the contrast between the quality of education between private/grammar/top state schools and normal schools is a steep one, so is the confidence of state schooled and selective schooled pupils and the qualities of life they had. Gender segregation in schools is also unbelievably stupid.
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    (Original post by PimpsNChuds)
    I'm very against selective schooling but I completely understand the vulgarity of state schools (and I also went to the 'best' one in my area) and would definitely go to a private school if I had a choice (but ultimately my parents are poor and it wasn't my choice at all). I reckon I picked up some mental illnesses from my state comp. If I hadn't gone to one I doubt I'd be the socially anxious billy-no-mates failure I am today.
    Yes, I think I understand your point. I had a lot of problems in the lower years of my state school, however I'd say they were more due to my own personal issues than anything. I sometimes doubt if a private school would have been quite as understanding with some of the difficulties I experienced socially.

    Though, I would say generally most state comps instil a very negative attitude in most pupils. Even the best of them suffer from oversized classes with little personal attention and a viciously anti-academic environment; even some of the brightest kids cannot function at their best amidst that. Couple that stifling of personal learning and development with being socially alienated, and a state school can be quite an unforgiving place.

    (Original post by PimpsNChuds)
    However, I think the educational advantage selective schools place on people is way, way too high. 95% of the time you can easily tell whether someone went to a selective school or not; the contrast between the quality of education between private/grammar/top state schools and normal schools is a steep one, so is the confidence of state schooled and selective schooled pupils and the qualities of life they had. Gender segregation in schools is also unbelievably stupid.
    Perhaps so. But I'm still a very strong believer of the fact that anyone, if they put their all into it, can achieve what they want no matter what kind of school they attended. The unfortunate truth, though, is that state comp students simply have to work far harder and more independently to achieve the same kind of success the private/grammar school students have.

    Ideally, I'd say there needs to be a governmental focus on raising the standard and quality of the vast majority of comprehensive schools. However, realistically, I doubt whether that's truly possible. There was a recent proposal by Tristram Hunt, I believe, that all top private schools should form a mandatory partnership with a state school. I thoroughly disagree with the idea that such a thing should be compulsory, but that's at least one of the ways state schools could be reformed. If the top public schools such as Eton, Harrow, Winchester, etc. made a conscious decision to partner with and advise schools in the state sector, their expertise could be put to good use. Maybe also encourage partnerships in terms of student base too, so that those from the private/public/grammar schools can mix with the "disadvantaged" state school students.

    The other, and most pressing, issue is that the comprehensive school system is completely regressive. I would propose a return to a similar system as what was maintained in the 1970s and earlier, where the 11+ exam was taken by all students at the end of primary school to determine whether they would enter a regular secondary school or a grammar school - both being entirely free and state-funded. The removal of this system has meant that many lower/working class or otherwise disadvantaged children have no access to schools other than comprehensives, and in the few places where grammar schools are still maintained, the vast majority of kids sent there already come from well-off backgrounds. There needs to be a fully concentrated effort at getting the brightest children into the best possible schools at a young age, regardless of their family background; as well as an equally strong effort towards making sure regular secondary schools are of a high academic standard as well.
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    yeah, i did
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    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    No, why waste money on private education :erm:
    It is not the education you pay for ...
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    Yes but I was on a 75% academic bursary and my gran paid for it. I loved my school yet my sister hated it. Think it depends on the person.
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    Hi just would like to ask whether the people on here went to private school
    Hell no. My parents couldn't have afforded it, ever. However I do remember going to a netball match at a close by private school in Year 6 and finding all the girls very nice and sweet and lovely. This was very much unlike my state school where I was a perpetually bullied outsider, so longing to go there I spent about a year begging my parents to send me there for high school. It never happened.
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    (Original post by Robertus)


    Perhaps so. But I'm still a very strong believer of the fact that anyone, if they put their all into it, can achieve what they want no matter what kind of school they attended. The unfortunate truth, though, is that state comp students simply have to work far harder and more independently to achieve the same kind of success the private/grammar school students have.
    .
    When you get to first year university it's impossible for someone from a state school to overtake those with the confidence and absoloutley amazing education that Private School students have received. Really annoying how almost everyone I've ever met from a private school appears not to have even a shred of self-doubt.
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    Yeaj they are definitely more confident and I think generally they are nicer schools to go to as there is less bullying unpleasantness etc
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    (Original post by Temporality)
    When you get to first year university it's impossible for someone from a state school to overtake those with the confidence and absoloutley amazing education that Private School students have received. Really annoying how almost everyone I've ever met from a private school appears not to have even a shred of self-doubt.
    There are a lot of state schools that are better than a lot of private schools. If you compare someone's experiences at a top state school with a lesser private school you may find the top state school student is better prepared.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    There are a lot of state schools that are better than a lot of private schools. If you compare someone's experiences at a top state school with a lesser private school you may find the top state school student is better prepared.
    lol that's definitely not the case where I'm from
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    Yeaj they are definitely more confident and I think generally they are nicer schools to go to as there is less bullying unpleasantness etc
    How do you know that if you've never been to private school?

    Private schools are a complete red herring as far as personal confidence goes. Private students are generally more confident because of the families they come from, not as a result of their education.
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    (Original post by Temporality)
    lol that's definitely not the case where I'm from
    Well I think top state schools tend to be concentrated in very well-to-do areas where most people could probably afford private school anyway if they had to, and you've said you couldn't. But in national terms it's true.
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    (Original post by TeeEm)
    It is not the education you pay for ...
    huh?
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    How do you know that if you've never been to private school?

    Private schools are a complete red herring as far as personal confidence goes. Private students are generally more confident because of the families they come from, not as a result of their education.
    I know people who go to private schools I think it is more to do with the schools as most of the families are normal. In state schools there is usually bullying etc and are generally more hostile environments.
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    I'd like to think I am in a good position to discuss this. I went to a state school for 11 years and then switched for Sixth Form to a private school and I can say that it was the best decision in the world.
    My state school was a **** hole. To look at, it would seem a great school because it had good grades BUT it only pushed you if you were predicted A/A*, otherwise they couldn't give a toss. And if you didn't get it first time in the lesson, tough; you're obviously just retarded. I know people that resat some of their modules 5 times in order to get the best results possible. They refused to let you do the subject you were passionate about, instead making you do the subjects you are good at, hence why as a 'science student' I now study History! 9/10 of the teachers couldn't care, they were verbally abusive to students. In fairness, 2 of my top 3 favourite ever teachers came from there but it was either really good or really bad! They had no sports teams in place and you were discouraged from doing sports because it interfered with your academic achievements. Pastorally, it was even worse. I was bullied for 2 years, to the extent where people were sending me death threats and the school did nothing. Why? Because the problem was too widespread to deal with. In fact, they cancelled my meeting with an Ofsted inspector because I would say bad things about the school. Fantastic. Amazing. I know multiple people from there who have ended up either in therapy or in mental institutions. All in all, it was horrendous, and I have never, ever encountered such stuck-up, snobbish, bratty people in all of my life.
    By comparison, my Sixth Form was incredible. It was roughly the same size, so no one can play that card, but everyone was a human being! The students were incredibly supportive of each other and 99.9% polite and respectful to each other. Obviously their were some issues, but they were dealt with quickly and actually dealt with, not pushed under the carpet. The teachers were literally my home from home. I've had a really rough year with medical problems, and the school were brilliant. They gave me so much support. We had 3 hours of sport a week, we organised House dinners, we went on trips. My head master couldn't give a toss about league tables and encouraged us to follow our passions; and before people say 'Well, didn't everyone just want to go to Oxford or live off the inheritance?', no.
    I guess my view is slightly biased because of how **** my state school was, but everything that a private school gave me wasn't money related. It gave me the confidence to talk to my peers, taught me to speak to adults clearly, and also gave me enough self-confidence to hold my head high in the company of people that reduced me to almost nothing.
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    (Original post by Temporality)
    huh?
    To be with the right people around you ...

    the son of such and such MP
    the son of such and such heart surgeon
    the daughter of such and such banker
    the son of such and such QC
    the daughter of Theo Paphitis
    the son of such and such builder (sorry wrong person...)
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    I do now.

    Have to say standard is a lot higher than state school. But that's because I went to a **** state school.

    Certainly not worth the fees though, but it's a nice place I suppose.
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    What was good about it exactly? Did you have any experience of state schools or was it just private schools for you?
    Primary Yr1 was in your very usual UK state primary.
    Primary Yr2 till Yr6 in a very high standard semi-government school in Singapore.
    After that UK public school for all but 4 months where in Yr8 I went to a very good state-comp.

    What was good about it?

    -Better teachers, didn't read off a book or prepared notes, knew how to deliver lessons in an interesting manner and spoke clearly.
    -Better classrooms, was well heated and lighted, not cramped and was well furnished with high quality furniture that didn't creak or pinch your bum or thighs.
    -Top notch facilities, toilets were spotlessly clean and didn't stink. Labs were well equipped and everything worked. It actually had computer labs where you were encouraged to use it as much as possible at a time where most people in UK never had one at their homes and usually only existed in the school office.
    -Tremendous opportunities for extra-curricular activities, while I also had the opportunity to do in the state one it would had been out of pocket or because I had parents and grandparents who were willing to pay. -
    -Classroom behaviour, you get thrown out of the class if you misbehaved. Disruptions were rare and you don't get situations where half the lesson is wasted due to disciplinary issues.
    -Academics, teachers encouraged you to exceed your own expectation and do their best to ensure you get the best education you could get.
    -No dirty, smelly and cootie infested plebs to sit among in class. You would get a nice good sounding from your housemaster if you didn't take care of your personal hygiene.
    -The opportunity to today know people who are a somebody somewhere. Many of them went to the same school and are today holding important positions in businesses, companies and state.

    Edited : Forgot, how could I forget!! The food!!!!!!!!! 1980s and early 90s food at state schools were :facepalm:
 
 
 
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