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    https://uk.isidewith.com/political-quiz
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    (Original post by Gott)
    This is what would make me vote UKIP but I'm not sure
    First past the post means that unless a change in support is on the scale of a tidal wave, like 1945 or 1997, the change will happen slowly. What we're seeing now is the free market of democracy in action; the two main parties are being outflanked on either side, and people are abandoning their brand allegiances and voting with their heads. I would happily go through 5 years of Miliband's take on austerity, if it meant we got a fair referendum and possibly a UKIP government in 2020. The second places for UKIP in this election are just as important as the first, see here.

    http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/sebasti...nes-with-ukip/
    http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/...-its-strategy/
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    (Original post by Nickbonista)
    First past the post means that unless a change in support is on the scale of a tidal wave, like 1945 or 1997, the change will happen slowly. What we're seeing now is the free market of democracy in action; the two main parties are being outflanked on either side, and people are abandoning their brand allegiances and voting with their heads. I would happily go through 5 years of Miliband's take on austerity, if it meant we got a fair referendum and possibly a UKIP government in 2020. The second places for UKIP in this election are just as important as the first, see here.

    http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/sebasti...nes-with-ukip/
    http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/...-its-strategy/
    I suppose so, I tend to find my true sympathies are with the Peter Hitchens 'obiturist' school of thought anyway
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    (Original post by spurs9393)
    There is nothing racist or stereotypical about wanting control of our borders


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    Whats a border?
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    (Original post by Lionheart96)
    Whats a border?
    I didn't know socialists don't have dictionaries.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/border
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    (Original post by Gott)
    I suppose so, I tend to find my true sympathies are with the Peter Hitchens 'obiturist' school of thought anyway
    Absolutely, the Tories cannot renegotiate with the EU (nobody can, you're in or out) and are only offering a referendum to keep their party together. A Miliband government will have to make the same cuts after winning on an anti-austerity platform, so will become extremely unpopular. The future is bright for UKIP, so long as we gain a foothold and platform to build on this time round. I accept to a lot of potential voters UKIP aren't perfect, but we are a battering ram against the main two parties, and would secure a fair referendum. Then hypothetically, two natural parties of the left and right would rise, instead of the two we have now whose purpose and goals are simply to be elected, not to represent views or concerns.
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    (Original post by Nickbonista)
    I didn't know socialists don't have dictionaries.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/border
    What makes a border a border?
    Who decides where to draw an imaginary line?
    If you were walking from france into spain, would you be a ble to tell when you crossed a border if there were no signs to indicate it?
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    Most likely - I prefer them to the Tories. They're about as close to a classical liberal/libertarian party in the UK as it will get, so I like them on that ground.

    Test results...

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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    Most likely - I prefer them to the Tories. They're about as close to a classical liberal/libertarian party in the UK as it will get, so I like them on that ground.

    Test results...

    You say they are closest to classic liberalist in the UK. What UKIP policies do you view a libeterian? I would personaly see the lib-dems as more libiterian( as they advocate for more freedom: decriminilisation of certain drugs, open borders) and compared to the Conservatives as I havent seen any UKIP policy isn't more libiterian but I am intrested to hear what you think
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    (Original post by michael90cr)
    You say they are closest to classic liberalist in the UK. What UKIP policies do you view a libeterian? I would personaly see the lib-dems as more libiterian( as they advocate for more freedom: decriminilisation of certain drugs, open borders) and compared to the Conservatives as I havent seen any UKIP policy isn't more libiterian but I am intrested to hear what you think
    We're fiscally and foreign policy-wise more libertarian, but socially more conservative than the definitive libertarian.
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    (Original post by Lionheart96)
    What makes a border a border?
    Who decides where to draw an imaginary line?
    If you were walking from france into spain, would you be a ble to tell when you crossed a border if there were no signs to indicate it?
    Usually borders develop around physical features like mountains or rivers, and deserts, as groups of people can coalesce in between these features, and develop into a society with a common culture, language, history, and government. They also mean the society has a defence against others, as they have to cross mountains, rivers, or deserts to reach them.

    Examples are the Pyrenees since you mention France and Spain (there are regions of crossover like Navarre and Andorra, but the principle stands), the Czech lands being borderd by the Carpathian and Sudeten mountains (among others), meaning they've had an almost continual existence within the same borders with a period being part of the Austrian Empire, and Egypt being bordered by deserts to the East, West, and South, and forming along the Nile Valley. A river example is the Tweed separating Scotland and England for hundreds of years.

    As for knowing when you've crossed a border, the physical features are usually a kick-off, as I explained, you're likely to have crossed something significant like a mountain range. Culture-wise, there are obviously solvent effects on a border as almost non are completely impervious, but the language is likely to be if not different entirely, then a different dialect. Architecture will likely be different, people's religious traditions, diet, military traditions, laws, need I continue?

    These links may prove useful, hope I cleared that up

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geopolitics
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropology
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    I am not sure if I can agree with you on the foreign policy side, while the EU are regulatory they protect certain human rights and provide freedom of movement. I do support Fiscal libiterianism to a degree, but at the same time I view the need for regulation. The one thing that I strongly support UKIP on is that they don't view the NHS as a given and had an open debate about deciding whether to fund it (I do agree with the NHS I just think it should not be given special treatment when other key budgets education and defence suffer massive cuts). However, there lack of proffesionalism and policy that I agree with means I will not vote for them. thank you for explaining your views without trying to make silly generic comments about your oppostion
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    (Original post by michael90cr)
    You say they are closest to classic liberalist in the UK. What UKIP policies do you view a libeterian? I would personaly see the lib-dems as more libiterian( as they advocate for more freedom: decriminilisation of certain drugs, open borders) and compared to the Conservatives as I havent seen any UKIP policy isn't more libiterian but I am intrested to hear what you think
    Several; their commitment to lower tax liabilities, which go further than those of the Tories (they initially touted the flat tax, which IMO is a great idea, but they have abandoned it for now); a commitment to cutting red tape for SMEs; anti-interventionist stance regarding foreign wars; reducing welfare dependence longer term; they're quite strongly against the more illiberal aspects of the EAW; advocating withdrawal from the EU (more autonomy in how to regulate, perhaps a lighter touch than the EU's dirigiste approach, and also less money transferred to the EU...), since it's gone beyond its remit of a free trade area, whilst still advocating trade with Europe on account of it being mutually beneficial.

    Open borders isn't a cut and dry libertarian issue, in the context of immigration being subsidised and a lot of infrastructure being publicly funded. If there were very limited 'welfare' provision etc., and all the costs of immigration (aka moving) devolved on the parties involved, I would see little issue with open borders, but at present that isn't the system the UK or other countries operate under.

    Whilst I am very socially liberal on issues like civil partnerships or drug legalisation, I consider them pretty minor issues in the grand scheme of things, and I consider the UK's future economic prosperity far more important, particularly rebalancing its heavy reliance on the financial sector and asset bubbles. It's not like UKIP are particularly socially conservative, either. Not wanting churches to be forced to perform marriages for gay couples whilst still supporting the idea of civil partnerships, for instance, is a very libertarian approach to it.

    The LDs are somewhat socially liberal, which is great, but I consider the economic policies they're going into the next election with rather silly, and certainly not very libertarian.
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    (Original post by Nickbonista)
    As for knowing when you've crossed a border, the physical features are usually a kick-off, as I explained, you're likely to have crossed something significant like a mountain range. Culture-wise, there are obviously solvent effects on a border as almost non are completely impervious, but the language is likely to be if not different entirely, then a different dialect. Architecture will likely be different, people's religious traditions, diet, military traditions, laws, need I continue?
    He's making the point borders are mostly arbitary while they ususally have some logic they arn't always. ake the middle-east for example after colonial rule from Europe, their borders don't make sence as such it has caused cultural tension and multiple wars. The idea in the EU is that open borders helps facilitate trade and industry. I personally believe if that where your are born should have no impact on your rights whether it be housing, Jobs or benifit, if someone else is willing to undercut you, you offer a better service or match the price. You shouldn't get prefirential treatmeant becuase you are born in the UK. I have britsh ancestry for generations and am white and if someone from Germany, Poland or Romania take an opportuity from me because they deserve it, fair dues to them because that does't make me entitled to a Job or Benifits
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    (Original post by Simone R)
    Is there anyone here who is going to vote for Ukip?

    I am making a website about students views on the election, and I'm looking for students who are going to vote for Ukip. If that's you, contact me or write here and I'll contact you.
    I'd rather die than vote UKIP.
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    If the EU wants to do nothing but facilitate trade and industry, its remit should be vastly reduced. That isn't the intention of many high up eurocrats at all. They want a fiscal union, following their monetary one, and I fail to see how reducing competition, e.g. on tax, between governments will benefit anyone.
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    (Original post by Simone R)
    Is there anyone here who is going to vote for Ukip?

    I am making a website about students views on the election, and I'm looking for students who are going to vote for Ukip. If that's you, contact me or write here and I'll contact you.
    I'm voting Tory. A vote for UKIP is a vote for Labour.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    Several; their commitment to lower tax liabilities, which go further than those of the Tories (they initially touted the flat tax, which IMO is a great idea, but they have abandoned it for now); a commitment to cutting red tape for SMEs; anti-interventionist stance regarding foreign wars; reducing welfare dependence longer term; they're quite strongly against the more illiberal aspects of the EAW; advocating withdrawal from the EU (more autonomy in how to regulate, perhaps a lighter touch than the EU's dirigiste approach, and also less money transferred to the EU...), since it's gone beyond its remit of a free trade area, whilst still advocating trade with Europe on account of it being mutually beneficial.

    Open borders isn't a cut and dry libertarian issue, in the context of immigration being subsidised and a lot of infrastructure being publicly funded. If there were very limited 'welfare' provision etc., and all the costs of immigration (aka moving) devolved on the parties involved, I would see little issue with open borders, but at present that isn't the system the UK or other countries operate under.

    Whilst I am very socially liberal on issues like civil partnerships or drug legalisation, I consider them pretty minor issues in the grand scheme of things, and I consider the UK's future economic prosperity far more important, particularly rebalancing its heavy reliance on the financial sector and asset bubbles. It's not like UKIP are particularly socially conservative, either. Not wanting churches to be forced to perform marriages for gay couples whilst still supporting the idea of civil partnerships, for instance, is a very libertarian approach to it.

    The LDs are somewhat socially liberal, which is great, but I consider the economic policies they're going into the next election with rather silly, and certainly not very libertarian.
    I also consider Economic policy more important, and as a result I believe we are best served with the conservatives. The EU is an increadiably complex and I don't believe me, you or Nigel Farage are educated enough to value it. The fact that the three main parties are close to consensus on this issue leads me to believe civil servants and other experts have largely come down on it being a net benifit. However, even if we did leave, we would most likely still follow most EU legislation like Switzerland but have no say in making it. Futhermore, we need the EU to tackle multi-national companies like apple, Amazon and stabucks otherwise we would have little influence over much of there practices.
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    Yes. Not because I actually support their ideology (whatever that is), only because the Conservative party is as clueless as the other clueless parties, and Cameron is a fool.
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    I have much broader views but, I am against UKIP on to much but I don't wish to go into it in detail. My biggest problem is I cannot trust their Reprenitives. I am economicly right wing and socialy I lean I generally agree with a liberalist view. I am not loyal to any political party but can only see my self supporting conservatives or lib-dems durring this elections campign.
 
 
 
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