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Girl sent home from school due to hair style? watch

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    Firstly the kid was picked on - so what her answer? Get a haircut that guarantees she will be picked on even more

    Secondly - she looks like a boy. A rather sulky boy at that
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    (Original post by silverbolt)
    Firstly the kid was picked on - so what her answer? Get a haircut that guarantees she will be picked on even more

    Secondly - she looks like a boy. A rather sulky boy at that
    Alright silverbolt, calm down, no ones asking you to **** her.
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    I do think it is ridiculous when children are sent home because of something minor- like a small part of their shoe isn't black- but this is just crazy!! Pretty much every school has "no extreme hair cuts" as part of their uniform rules, so when then do this?! It's so over the top. If she went into a job interview like that, most places would show her the door! This is a typical case of someone pushing the rules to see where they break!
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    (Original post by n09)
    Unless her haircut involved a scalping she's not unfit for school.




    I'm not saying there are laws in place, but if a parent faces fines and jail time for taking a child out of school without good reason then so should a school.
    The difference is the school will still make provisions for her education during this time. A parent on holiday probably would not.


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    This kind of thing is everywhere in the news lately

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-holidays.html


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    (Original post by e aí rapaz)
    is so depressing. As if in the "adult world" you can't possibly have a respectable place in society while also having a kind of strange hairstyle :rolleyes:

    Honestly **** like that feels like something out of a george orwell novel. "Expressing yourself through personal style and individual choices must not be culturally acceptable!!"

    It'd be funny if it wasn't so sad.
    It might be sad but it's true. The world judges you based on your appearance. It may not be right, butthere's a difference in the social and cultural acceptability of certain hairstyles whether we like it or not. A school would do its pupils a disservice to pretend otherwise.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    It might be sad but it's true. The world judges you based on your appearance. It may not be right, butthere's a difference in the social and cultural acceptability of certain hairstyles whether we like it or not. A school would do its pupils a disservice to pretend otherwise.
    Maybe they could give the pupils a list of approved hairstyles.


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    (Original post by n09)
    Maybe they could give the pupils a list of approved hairstyles.


    A lot of schools here already do. I suppose it's mostly just about common sense though.
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    (Original post by redleader1)
    Schools are also about discipline, her mum sent her to that school and should have known the rules. The student broke the rules and was therefore punished.
    True, but I think we should examine the issue deeper by seeking to define what it is that makes a rule worth implementing.

    From here, it looks as though the school has a rule regarding how people look. Does that not seem absurd to you? We're talking about an institution of learning, and what this "rule" imparts (at a base level) is "if you don't look like we want you to, you're going to get punished". A bit draconian, no?

    This "rule" is nothing more than an opinion that has weight behind it on paper only. There's no moral high ground to be gained from it, and it operates under the implication that someone's appearance directly influences their ability to learn (which as we all know, is ridiculous as well as completely illogical).

    Obeying rules without questioning them is retarded. I'm not advocating complete defiance of any and all laws, merely that they be questioned if they seek to serve no beneficial purpose for the populace. And that thought extends to the schooling environment as well.
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    fair one it is a degenerate hair cut
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    (Original post by Drunk Punx)
    True, but I think we should examine the issue deeper by seeking to define what it is that makes a rule worth implementing.

    From here, it looks as though the school has a rule regarding how people look. Does that not seem absurd to you? We're talking about an institution of learning, and what this "rule" imparts (at a base level) is "if you don't look like we want you to, you're going to get punished". A bit draconian, no?

    This "rule" is nothing more than an opinion that has weight behind it on paper only. There's no moral high ground to be gained from it, and it operates under the implication that someone's appearance directly influences their ability to learn (which as we all know, is ridiculous as well as completely illogical).

    Obeying rules without questioning them is retarded. I'm not advocating complete defiance of any and all laws, merely that they be questioned if they seek to serve no beneficial purpose for the populace. And that thought extends to the schooling environment as well.
    It's not really any different to her turning up in a Nike tracksuit and complaining that she's been sent home. I've always thought schools having uniforms is a bit silly but it's just part of going to school in the UK.


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    It's not really any different to her turning up in a Nike tracksuit and complaining that she's been sent home. I've always thought schools having uniforms is a bit silly but it's just part of going to school in the UK.
    By its' very definition it's different. A school uniform is part of a dress code, a haircut is part of a persons' very identity.
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    (Original post by Drunk Punx)
    By its' very definition it's different. A school uniform is part of a dress code, a haircut is part of a persons' very identity.
    But the schools uniform doesn't apply merely to dress code, it includes hairstyles


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    What a repulsive hairstyle. Glad she was sent home, such an atrocity should not be allowed in such an environment.

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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    But the schools uniform doesn't apply merely to dress code, it includes hairstyles
    Which it shouldn't. Make kids wear a school uniform if you must, but their personal stylings should never be brought under microscope because how children, especially teenagers, express themselves is an important part of them finding out who they are and what kind of person they are. If they don't like who they are, or who their appearance makes others perceive the individual to be, then they can change, but the change must be brought on by themselves instead of someone else in "authority" telling them what they should look like.

    Which brings me back to the questioning of rules.
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    It's the old question of where to set the bar when it comes to the relationship between the Individual and the State, is there a case for overruling the parents in terms of judgement on something like their kids' hairstyle? Only if we set off from the premise that parents cannot be trusted with such decisions, that you can't risk having a kid turn up with a pineapple shaped haircut, or bright orange because... what, it disrupts the environment? What if you just accept it and say nothing?
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    She should hire a lawyer and attempt to sue the school.
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    (Original post by Drunk Punx)
    Which it shouldn't. Make kids wear a school uniform if you must, but their personal stylings should never be brought under microscope because how children, especially teenagers, express themselves is an important part of them finding out who they are and what kind of person they are. If they don't like who they are, or who their appearance makes others perceive the individual to be, then they can change, but the change must be brought on by themselves instead of someone else in "authority" telling them what they should look like.

    Which brings me back to the questioning of rules.
    But then why is a dress code okay but telling kids to have sensible haircuts isn't?

    (Original post by KristersS)
    She should hire a lawyer and attempt to sue the school.
    On what grounds?


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    But then why is a dress code okay but telling kids to have sensible haircuts isn't?
    In my opinion? It isn't, really. I think it's an absurd concept backed up by faulty logic, but I've come to terms with it. I draw the line at something the school having a say over something that is a more permanent mainstay in your life outside of school though.
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    (Original post by n09)
    Maybe they could give the pupils a list of approved hairstyles.


    Lucky North Korean gals, oooww! no. 12 isn't bad.
 
 
 
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