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Is Medicine the Alpha Male university course? watch

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    (Original post by vis break)
    u got a degree on counter strike? thats beta af m9
    Computer Science m9

    bit dumb of you to miss that tbh, and if that was a joke it just wasn't funny. so you failed.

    FYI the only people who use the alpha/beta dichotomy have some ****ed up inferiority complex, tragic really.
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    Medicine. I wouldn't mind a doc who could stitch me up and then **** me hard.
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    Well, medicine is around 60% female in terms of medical students. Certainly, at my University, women are the majority.

    Male medics definitely appeal to the opposite gender, there's no doubt about that. But that's because doctors are seen as caring and intelligent, which are positive traits.
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    You have caught me vis break, you have seen through my ruse. Truly I am a beta male, while you are Alpha af. Please carry on, while I white knight some more. My jimmies have truly been rustled.
    No problem fam
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    (Original post by catdeid)
    Medicine. I wouldn't mind a doc who could stitch me up and then **** me hard.
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    (Original post by FireDwarf2)
    Genuine question, what do computer scientist actually do once they qualify? Like, what kind of jobs? I see loads of people talking about it on TSR but I've never identified what makes them that much different from someone studying computing related degrees etc.
    Right this is simple. Its all dependant on what university they go to and what type of degree/experience they leave university with.

    If you study Computer Science/Computing/Software Engineering at the top 10 unis (Oxbridge, Imperial, Warwick etc.), AND you do a summer internship at a technology firm every summer you are at university, chances are you'll end up being offered a job through one of those internships. This is a process that a lot of the more able students go through as it guarantees job security if you do it right. Top technology firms include the investment banks, Facebook, Google, Apple etc.

    Salaries vary but I wouldn't be surprised to be earning 60k upwards at a top firm.

    Computer scientists can also go into a lot of other job fields, such as banking, business etc.

    Heck some people even go off and start their own companies and some of them have become billionaires through it (Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Evan Spiegel, you name it, they're all computer science graduates/drop outs, now all businessmen at the worlds biggest companies)

    Computer science teaches you a lot of theoretical concepts, some of which you'll struggle to use as soon as you graduate, but there will be a need for them in the future. So you could say that computer scientists are qualified theorists (kinda like physics graduates). Currently demand for such skills is low but one job I could think of which would utilise the technical/theoretical expertise of a computer scientist is a data scientist (who basically just make sense of big data, very fast)

    On the other end of the spectrum, if you end up at a bad university (like London South Bank, Birmingham City etc.), you will struggle to find work as your degree is a lot less difficult and respected than the degrees at the top universities (hence the entry requirement difference). A lot of these graduates end up either unemployed or working in retail hence defeating the purpose of them graduating in computer science. Don't fall into this trap, it's better just to not go.
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    Right this is simple. Its all dependant on what university they go to and what type of degree/experience they leave university with.

    If you study Computer Science/Computing/Software Engineering at the top 10 unis (Oxbridge, Imperial, Warwick etc.), AND you do a summer internship at a technology firm every summer you are at university, chances are you'll end up being offered a job through one of those internships. This is a process that a lot of the more able students go through as it guarantees job security if you do it right. Top technology firms include the investment banks, Facebook, Google, Apple etc.

    Salaries vary but I wouldn't be surprised to be earning 60k upwards at a top firm.

    Computer scientists can also go into a lot of other job fields, such as banking, business etc.

    Heck some people even go off and start their own companies and some of them have become billionaires through it (Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Evan Spiegel, you name it, they're all computer science graduates/drop outs, now all businessmen at the worlds biggest companies)

    Computer science teaches you a lot of theoretical concepts, some of which you'll struggle to use as soon as you graduate, but there will be a need for them in the future. So you could say that computer scientists are qualified theorists (kinda like physics graduates). Currently demand for such skills is low but one job I could think of which would utilise the technical/theoretical expertise of a computer scientist is a data scientist (who basically just make sense of big data, very fast)

    On the other end of the spectrum, if you end up at a bad university (like London South Bank, Birmingham City etc.), you will struggle to find work as your degree is a lot less difficult and respected than the degrees at the top universities (hence the entry requirement difference). A lot of these graduates end up either unemployed or working in retail hence defeating the purpose of them graduating in computer science. Don't fall into this trap, it's better just to not go.
    I have to disagree with you on the point you made about the ****ty universities. I'm pretty sure you haven't been to every single university to see the curriculum of their courses, so who are you to decide their courses are easy?

    Computer science is a difficult course, it's on par with engineering in terms of difficulty and is one of the most difficult subjects you can do, though probably a Mid-tier STEM subject in terms of difficulty.

    Whilst I think it's important to get a degree from a top institution, I got my CS degree from a Uni around 20ish in the tables and have gone on to get a masters offer at QMUL as well as a job as a software engineer at Barclays, i can code and I have the tech skills needed so I have excelled, despite not going to the "top unis"

    CS is a strong subject so you don't necessarily have to go to Oxbridge to do well, where CS students fail is when they don't learn to code properly and leave uni without any programming skills. 99% of the jobs will need coding skills, and strong ones at that, but MOST CS graduates wont be able to deliver, even those at the top unis.

    Employers have started to really dislike CS graduates for their inability to code. I've coded for 9 years and that's partly why I've had success in the jobs market. I get recruiters calling me just about every day trying to offer me jobs.

    Computer Science is probably the most lucrative and secure subject, but it is hard as hell. Aim for the best uni's but saying you consider it a "waste of time" if you can't get into the top unis, I think that's a ridiculous notion. For jobs you need a CS degree, you can't get the IT sector jobs without one. So don't go around spreading **** mate. A degree is a degree
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    (Original post by It's a Shame)
    Sexist much? No degree can make you the dominant partner. It's called equality.

    Oh, just a reminder... there will be women on that course. They will have equal skills and aptitude, and some will be better than you.

    Feminism can be eradicated when women are seen as, and treated equal to, men.
    since when has being 'alpha male' sexist? it has a presence in animals not just humans lol. mental
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    (Original post by TheMaster102)
    I have to disagree with you on the point you made about the ****ty universities. I'm pretty sure you haven't been to every single university to see the curriculum of their courses, so who are you to decide their courses are easy?

    Computer science is a difficult course, it's on par with engineering in terms of difficulty and is one of the most difficult subjects you can do, though probably a Mid-tier STEM subject in terms of difficulty.

    Whilst I think it's important to get a degree from a top institution, I got my CS degree from a Uni around 20ish in the tables and have gone on to get a masters offer at QMUL as well as a job as a software engineer at Barclays, i can code and I have the tech skills needed so I have excelled, despite not going to the "top unis"

    CS is a strong subject so you don't necessarily have to go to Oxbridge to do well, where CS students fail is when they don't learn to code properly and leave uni without any programming skills. 99% of the jobs will need coding skills, and strong ones at that, but MOST CS graduates wont be able to deliver, even those at the top unis.

    Employers have started to really dislike CS graduates for their inability to code. I've coded for 9 years and that's partly why I've had success in the jobs market. I get recruiters calling me just about every day trying to offer me jobs.

    Computer Science is probably the most lucrative and secure subject, but it is hard as hell. Aim for the best uni's but saying you consider it a "waste of time" if you can't get into the top unis, I think that's a ridiculous notion. For jobs you need a CS degree, you can't get the IT sector jobs without one. So don't go around spreading **** mate. A degree is a degree
    No, I haven't been to every single university, but I know enough people at a few of the lower ranked universities, and the trend between these people is that they find it really difficult to get work. Why would someone take a graduate from one of these universities over someone from the top. No offence but it is less likely for you to gain the skills you need to get into a top technology job at a ****ty university than it is to gain them at a good one.

    Around 20ish is fine, there is people who go to around 90ish and expect to gain a job when the graduate just from the skills they gain from the degree. QMUL is around 20ish too and a Barclays software engineering job is great, but you fail to realise that you are a minority, and that most people who get into jobs like this attend university at the top universities.

    Again not everywhere, it is taught completely differently at Oxford than it is taught at QMUL. Again at the top universities, they usually have 4+ coding modules every year, so if you don't leave uni with coding skills then you my friend have seriously ****ed up somewhere. 99% is an exaggeration, a lot of the technology jobs are hardware based, working in server farms, working on infrastructure and solutions, but coding is a big percentage never the less. Again, most of these graduates that you are talking about go about things wrong, due to poor guidance from a bad university.

    I have as much coding experience as you do, if not probably more, but I don't think its as easy as you think, some people are even more gifted at coding than us and they fail to find employment anywhere, they end up just sitting in their bedrooms all day hacking into websites just for the fun of it.

    What I said is a completely reasonable notion, a degree is a degree, but not every single degree is the same, thats not how it works, and you are ridiculous to think that. Not every single degree will equip you with the skills you need to become successful, and none of them are exactly the same as each other. Again thats an exaggeration, I know people working at the top investment banks as technology analysts who didn't do a CS degree, they did a maths one, or a physics one, heck I've even met someone who did Chemical Engineering, learnt little to no coding in their degree and now optimises code at Jp Morgan. I've also met a history and english graduate from the states who now works at facebook as a software engineer in London, I don't know about you but I don't think there is any technical skills to have been learnt from his degree. I'm not spreading any ****, you just fail to realise that your story isn't the general de facto story.
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    No, I haven't been to every single university, but I know enough people at a few of the lower ranked universities, and the trend between these people is that they find it really difficult to get work. Why would someone take a graduate from one of these universities over someone from the top. No offence but it is less likely for you to gain the skills you need to get into a top technology job at a ****ty university than it is to gain them at a good one.

    Around 20ish is fine, there is people who go to around 90ish and expect to gain a job when the graduate just from the skills they gain from the degree. QMUL is around 20ish too and a Barclays software engineering job is great, but you fail to realise that you are a minority, and that most people who get into jobs like this attend university at the top universities.

    Again not everywhere, it is taught completely differently at Oxford than it is taught at QMUL. Again at the top universities, they usually have 4+ coding modules every year, so if you don't leave uni with coding skills then you my friend have seriously ****ed up somewhere. 99% is an exaggeration, a lot of the technology jobs are hardware based, working in server farms, working on infrastructure and solutions, but coding is a big percentage never the less. Again, most of these graduates that you are talking about go about things wrong, due to poor guidance from a bad university.

    I have as much coding experience as you do, if not probably more, but I don't think its as easy as you think, some people are even more gifted at coding than us and they fail to find employment anywhere, they end up just sitting in their bedrooms all day hacking into websites just for the fun of it.

    What I said is a completely reasonable notion, a degree is a degree, but not every single degree is the same, thats not how it works, and you are ridiculous to think that. Not every single degree will equip you with the skills you need to become successful, and none of them are exactly the same as each other. Again thats an exaggeration, I know people working at the top investment banks as technology analysts who didn't do a CS degree, they did a maths one, or a physics one, heck I've even met someone who did Chemical Engineering, learnt little to no coding in their degree and now optimises code at Jp Morgan. I've also met a history and english graduate from the states who now works at facebook as a software engineer in London, I don't know about you but I don't think there is any technical skills to have been learnt from his degree. I'm not spreading any ****, you just fail to realise that your story isn't the general de facto story.
    At the end of the day though it's all about the person, not really the degree. To be honest.

    It is likely that the people who didn't go to the top uni's didn't do well at a-level and maybe just didn't have the ability. I don't think they're ****ed and I definitely don't think their degree's are easy.

    Employers look at the university you go to, but at the same time they don't tend to overly focus on that, I think your subject and grade play a much larger role, university my just be a deciding factor.

    I mean would you take someone with a third from Cambridge over someone with a first from somewhere like, Westminster?

    Westminster is a pretty terrible uni in terms of it's ranking, but I certainly wouldn't say that a degree from there is a waste of time, if that's all you can get, especially in CS. My course was hard as hell and it kind of makes me annoyed how much easier my peers doing humanities had it but the whole higher education system is so scewed because the grades, institutions and everything are so sporadic in their accreditation I think it's just a non-issue really where you go so long as you do well, going to a good uni helps but it's not the be all or end all in my opinion.

    I was one of the best programmers in my year but I wasn't very good at the more theoretical stuff, but I found that because I was such a good programmer I found it easy to get a job.

    I was literally getting so many job offers in my inbox I couldn't keep up. I was actually unable to reply to everyone sending me job offers.

    I got opportunities in Shanghai, Germany and Dubai and i have a 2:2 degree, that's right a Desmond.

    I used to think this would hold me back, but it really hasn't. Getting the job at barclays just goes to show that. I've also got the masters offer from QMUL.

    It really isn't about the grades or the uni like everyone seems to think, it's about your skills. I was successful becasue of my massive portfolio of independent software, my array of technicals skills; Java, C++, C#, XML, Javascript, Actionscript, Flash, Unity, Android etc...

    In fact the one project I made which got the most attention was for android wear. (smartwatches) I made a game for the android wear platform and some other software apps for it too. Ever since that's been on my CV i've been inundated with Jobs.

    In the tech game it's about what you can do, Computer science graduates with 1sts can't even write a hello world program, some probably can't even write a for loop or even know what a class is, or inheritance. I know this because I've graduated with such people.

    Uni only teaches you to copy knowledge and to regurgitate what you're told, working in IT is about problem solving. I personally have a horrendous memory so I haven't ever been good at exams but what has got me to where I am now is my skills and strong problem solving abilities. If I were a computer; I'd say I have a really strong CPU, plenty of RAM but a broken hard drive.

    That's what life is about, developing those. I know this is a student forum and great emphasis is placed on uni and grades but trust me, in life a degree isn't a ticket to a high paid job and it isn't a ticket to success.
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    ivybridge ubisoft You both have said incorrect things, now I'm gonna have to mega-quote and go through all of what you've said. :sigh:
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    (Original post by XcitingStuart)
    ivybridge ubisoft You both have said incorrect things, now I'm gonna have to mega-quote and go through all of what you've said. :sigh:
    Don't waste your time. Legit done with this thread.
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    (Original post by ivybridge)
    Don't waste your time. Legit done with this thread.
    Look what the rats dragged in :lol:
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    (Original post by It's a Shame)
    Sexist much? No degree can make you the dominant partner. It's called equality.

    Oh, just a reminder... there will be women on that course. They will have equal skills and aptitude, and some will be better than you.

    Feminism can be eradicated when women are seen as, and treated equal to, men.
    lol the butt-hurt in this post.
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    (Original post by Meninism)
    considering applying, predicted four A*s (not lying, see my threads)

    do women prefer medics over economics/law students? I would rather do STEM
    To be honest, yes probably. But do what you want, don't do medicine if you aren't invested in it, its a life not just a degree.
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    (Original post by Okorange)
    To be honest, yes probably. But do what you want, don't do medicine if you aren't invested in it, its a life not just a degree.
    can you read this

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3583397
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    I read it, you had some great responses on the thread and I don't think I could add anything more to it.
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    (Original post by Computer Geek)
    Right this is simple. Its all dependant on what university they go to and what type of degree/experience they leave university with.

    If you study Computer Science/Computing/Software Engineering at the top 10 unis (Oxbridge, Imperial, Warwick etc.), AND you do a summer internship at a technology firm every summer you are at university, chances are you'll end up being offered a job through one of those internships. This is a process that a lot of the more able students go through as it guarantees job security if you do it right. Top technology firms include the investment banks, Facebook, Google, Apple etc.

    Salaries vary but I wouldn't be surprised to be earning 60k upwards at a top firm.

    Computer scientists can also go into a lot of other job fields, such as banking, business etc.

    Heck some people even go off and start their own companies and some of them have become billionaires through it (Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Evan Spiegel, you name it, they're all computer science graduates/drop outs, now all businessmen at the worlds biggest companies)

    Computer science teaches you a lot of theoretical concepts, some of which you'll struggle to use as soon as you graduate, but there will be a need for them in the future. So you could say that computer scientists are qualified theorists (kinda like physics graduates). Currently demand for such skills is low but one job I could think of which would utilise the technical/theoretical expertise of a computer scientist is a data scientist (who basically just make sense of big data, very fast)

    On the other end of the spectrum, if you end up at a bad university (like London South Bank, Birmingham City etc.), you will struggle to find work as your degree is a lot less difficult and respected than the degrees at the top universities (hence the entry requirement difference). A lot of these graduates end up either unemployed or working in retail hence defeating the purpose of them graduating in computer science. Don't fall into this trap, it's better just to not go.
    what are the top 10 unis for cs?
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    (Original post by CharliesBird)
    what are the top 10 unis for cs?
    Oxbridge, Imperial, Bristol, Warwick, Durham, UCL, Birmingham, Southampton. (in no order)
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    (Original post by CharliesBird)
    what are the top 10 unis for cs?
    Specifically I'd say it's something like this:

    Cambridge
    Imperial College
    Oxford

    (small gap)

    UCL
    Warwick
    Southampton
    Edinburgh
    Manchester
    Bristol


    (Big gap)

    Durham
    Birmingham
    .
    .
    .
 
 
 
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