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Sinister sausage - will you still eat processed meat? watch

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  • View Poll Results: Will you still eat processed/red meat?
    I'll still eat it
    310
    29.47%
    I'll cut down the amount of meat I eat
    265
    25.19%
    I'm going vegetarian/vegan
    121
    11.50%
    Don't care. Everything gives you cancer these days
    356
    33.84%

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    (Original post by animayo)
    This information has been around for so long, how has it only been published in the news now?
    Yes.

    I had to smile a few months ago when there was a big splash about eggs 'now' being good for you when that news had been around for a few years at least.

    Mind you there's a thread on here pointing out how cruel egg production is so please ignore the fact that eggs are 'now' good.
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    (Original post by Starvation13)
    I hardly ever eat processed meat, I only eat meat that my mum buys from the butchers and cooks tbh.

    Though this news isn't gonna make people change their minds...

    Now if you say red meats and processed foods will reduce penis length then THAT would be another story entirely.
    I bet you mum buys the WEE WILLIE WINKIE sausages for you.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    I've been cutting down on red & processed meat for a while, as my family has an extensive history of bowel cancer
    Hi, I'm not going to read through the whole thread, so apologies if someone has already said this. Also, if you already know this, then you can obviously ignore it

    You say your family has an extensive history of bowel cancer? Have any of you been tested to see if it is caused by a hereditary gene mutation?

    You see, it was only after my dad got bowel cancer (his dad and sister had already died from it and plenty of cousins had it too) that they got it checked out and it transpires that some of us have something called Lynch Syndrome which increases the risk of bowel cancer (and other cancers) significantly.

    If one of your parents has it, there is a 50% possibility of you having it. If you don't have it, then you don't have to worry, but if you do, then they give you colonoscopies every two years to make sure that no cancer develops or that it is caught early.

    If you haven't already been checked out, then I would really recommend it
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    (Original post by redferry)
    I never once mentioned obesity...
    Oh is "fat" not synonymous with obese anymore? Somebody should have told me...
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    (Original post by IamJacksContempt)
    Oh is "fat" not synonymous with obese anymore? Somebody should have told me...
    Being overweight is not the same s being obese.

    I'm amazed no-one has ever told you that but happy to take the task on myself.
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    (Original post by Plumstone)
    Hi, I'm not going to read through the whole thread, so apologies if someone has already said this. Also, if you already know this, then you can obviously ignore it

    You say your family has an extensive history of bowel cancer? Have any of you been tested to see if it is caused by a hereditary gene mutation?

    You see, it was only after my dad got bowel cancer (his dad and sister had already died from it and plenty of cousins had it too) that they got it checked out and it transpires that some of us have something called Lynch Syndrome which increases the risk of bowel cancer (and other cancers) significantly.

    If one of your parents has it, there is a 50% possibility of you having it. If you don't have it, then you don't have to worry, but if you do, then they give you colonoscopies every two years to make sure that no cancer develops or that it is caught early.

    If you haven't already been checked out, then I would really recommend it
    Hey,

    Thanks so much for the information I'm not sure what tests have been done :beard: Neither of my parents have had it, but it is in the family (many cousins/aunts/uncles) so my father and his siblings have regular checkups.

    I'm sorry to hear about your dad :hugs: Hope you're doing okay, too.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Hey,

    Thanks so much for the information I'm not sure what tests have been done :beard: Neither of my parents have had it, but it is in the family (many cousins/aunts/uncles) so my father and his siblings have regular checkups.

    I'm sorry to hear about your dad :hugs: Hope you're doing okay, too.
    It's okay - my dad got through it by the skin of his teeth (and thanks to my mum's expert care) and since his operation, he's been completely cancer free

    I'm pleased to hear that your dad and his siblings are getting regular check-ups. You could still talk to your GP about getting referred to a genetics clinic so that you can find out more, but as long as you're all being careful and managing the risk then that's good.

    I've just been invited to take part in a clinical trial to find out more about how aspirin reduces bowel cancer rates, so hopefully I'll be able to do something to help future generations to avoid it
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Being overweight is not the same s being obese.

    I'm amazed no-one has ever told you that but happy to take the task on myself.
    You never said overweight. You said "fat". Stop trying to worm your way out with lies.
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    (Original post by Plumstone)
    It's okay - my dad got through it by the skin of his teeth (and thanks to my mum's expert care) and since his operation, he's been completely cancer free

    I'm pleased to hear that your dad and his siblings are getting regular check-ups. You could still talk to your GP about getting referred to a genetics clinic so that you can find out more, but as long as you're all being careful and managing the risk then that's good.

    I've just been invited to take part in a clinical trial to find out more about how aspirin reduces bowel cancer rates, so hopefully I'll be able to do something to help future generations to avoid it
    I'm glad your Dad pulled through That's really great to hear.

    I will definitely ask if my dad has been tested for the gene.

    That's an amazing thing to do! Hopefully they will get some positive results from the study. Bowl cancer is such a horrbile disease to go through, I hope they find an effective way to avoid it.
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    (Original post by IamJacksContempt)
    You never said overweight. You said "fat". Stop trying to worm your way out with lies.
    Fat doesn't necessarily mean clinically obese though.


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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    Fat doesn't necessarily mean clinically obese though.


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    In most cases it does though, depending on what your interpretation of fat is.

    She's just nitpicking anyway to avoid the actual argument. My point was that eating meat isn't comparable to being fat in terms of negative health effects or cost to the NHS for that matter.
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    (Original post by Bigdobber)
    I bet you mum buys the WEE WILLIE WINKIE sausages for you.
    .....
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    (Original post by IamJacksContempt)
    You never said overweight. You said "fat". Stop trying to worm your way out with lies.
    Overweight is the same as fat. Neither is the same as obese.

    Now stop putting words into peoples mouths and admit you were wrong and that what you said was irrelevant.
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    (Original post by IamJacksContempt)
    In most cases it does though, depending on what your interpretation of fat is.

    She's just nitpicking anyway to avoid the actual argument. My point was that eating meat isn't comparable to being fat in terms of negative health effects or cost to the NHS for that matter.
    Fat people live longer and have less health problems than normal weight people? So really eating meat is worse than being fat.

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/01Januar...dy-claims.aspx
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Overweight is the same as fat. Neither is the same as obese.

    Now stop putting words into peoples mouths and admit you were wrong and that what you said was irrelevant.
    Totally wrong. Someone can be "overweight" without being fat. Someone cannot be obese without being fat.

    It's frightening how little you appear to know regarding this.


    (Original post by redferry)
    Fat people live longer and have less health problems than normal weight people? So really eating meat is worse than being fat.

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/01Januar...dy-claims.aspx
    Did you even bother to read past the title of that article? :rofl:

    'Having a body mass index (BMI) of between 30 and 35 (medically termed ‘obese’) causes more deaths, but people whose BMI was higher than 35 were 29% more likely to die by the end of the study than their normal-weight counterparts.'

    'The bottom line from this study was that being obese (all categories combined) increased the chance of dying compared to those with a normal BMI, although this was not the case for overweight individuals (BMI of between 25 and 29) or the lowest category of obesity (grade 1) on its own.However, a slight increase in lifespan doesn’t necessarily equate to an increased quality of life. Even being ‘just’ overweight can increase the chance of developing long-term health conditions, which while may not be fatal, can make life a lot less enjoyable.'
    'However, a limitation of the study is that it only assessed the risk of dying from any cause (‘all-cause’ mortality), rather than death from specific diseases such as cancer, heart disease or diabetes. The association between weight and risk of death for different disease categories may vary. Disability and living with long-term diseases are also important to people and some conditions such as diabetes may show stronger links with weight at lower thresholds of BMI.'

    You do realise that lower just above average BMI's don't necessarily mean that someone is fat? (Hence the reason your point about overweight being the same as fat is complete bull****)

    Wow great study you provided there to prove your point...
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    Even too much water can kill - its true its called hyponatremia we all die of something you know.
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    (Original post by IamJacksContempt)
    Totally wrong. Someone can be "overweight" without being fat. Someone cannot be obese without being fat.

    It's frightening how little you appear to know regarding this.




    Did you even bother to read past the title of that article? :rofl:

    'Having a body mass index (BMI) of between 30 and 35 (medically termed ‘obese’) causes more deaths, but people whose BMI was higher than 35 were 29% more likely to die by the end of the study than their normal-weight counterparts.'

    'The bottom line from this study was that being obese (all categories combined) increased the chance of dying compared to those with a normal BMI, although this was not the case for overweight individuals (BMI of between 25 and 29) or the lowest category of obesity (grade 1) on its own.However, a slight increase in lifespan doesn’t necessarily equate to an increased quality of life. Even being ‘just’ overweight can increase the chance of developing long-term health conditions, which while may not be fatal, can make life a lot less enjoyable.'
    'However, a limitation of the study is that it only assessed the risk of dying from any cause (‘all-cause’ mortality), rather than death from specific diseases such as cancer, heart disease or diabetes. The association between weight and risk of death for different disease categories may vary. Disability and living with long-term diseases are also important to people and some conditions such as diabetes may show stronger links with weight at lower thresholds of BMI.'

    You do realise that lower just above average BMI's don't necessarily mean that someone is fat? (Hence the reason your point about overweight being the same as fat is complete bull****)

    Wow great study you provided there to prove your point...

    I'm not talking about obesity I'm talking about fat people, what about that is so incomprehensible to you?
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Hey,

    Thanks so much for the information I'm not sure what tests have been done :beard: Neither of my parents have had it, but it is in the family (many cousins/aunts/uncles) so my father and his siblings have regular checkups.

    I'm sorry to hear about your dad :hugs: Hope you're doing okay, too.
    When a Lynch or FAP gene is found, it's always recommended that you get the family in to be tested too. If you haven't been asked in yet, then no one in your immediate family will've had a positive test for the gene!

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    (Original post by redferry)
    I'm not talking about obesity I'm talking about fat people, what about that is so incomprehensible to you?
    If they're not interchangeable then why did you link an article talking about obesity to try and prove your point that fat people live longer?

    Just admit you're wrong, Christ.
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    (Original post by she-ra)
    Words
    You might find this interesting:

    http://www.lamag.com/digestblog/a-sc...sm-and-cancer/
 
 
 
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