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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Because before I knew I was ace I felt broken.

    Because before I knew about asexuality I thought there was something wrong with me.

    Because I'm not a freak.

    Because my sexuality is not a gap.

    Because asexuality is not a second rate orientation.

    Because it is just as valid as any other.

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    So it is all about you, and not anyone else. So you want everyone else to change what they say to make just you happy? Sorry, but what world do you live in?
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    So it is all about you, and not anyone else. So you want everyone else to change what they say to make just you happy? Sorry, but what world do you live in?
    It is not just about me. Between one and six per cent of the population of the planet is asexual and many of us feel marginalised or broken because our sexual orientation is often ignored. I often have to create a new box when a survey asks my sexual orientation because asexuality is just not on there as an option. Asexuality has only just been taken out of the DSM. I want people to treat asexuals like they would any other orientation. Not treating it like an illness is a good start.

    The next step is acknowledging our existence. I do want people to change what they say. I want schools to mention the fact that not everyone feels sexual attraction and many people feel attraction very rarely. Then say that many people don't want sex ever. And basically acknowledge that asexuals aren't unicorns or little children. Putting it bluntly, I want inclusive sex education. I was never taught about how lesbian couples could prevent STD transmission. This obviously doesn't effect me, but it is a good sign of how broken sex ed is in schools at the moment.

    I live in this world. Which is why I want things to change. It is not acceptable to insult a gay person's sexual orientation, so why is it acceptable to insult an asexuals? Because when you call us special snowflakes that is what you are doing.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    It is not just about me. Between one and six per cent of the population of the planet is asexual and many of us feel marginalised or broken because our sexual orientation is often ignored. I often have to create a new box when a survey asks my sexual orientation because asexuality is just not on there as an option. Asexuality has only just been taken out of the DSM. I want people to treat asexuals like they would any other orientation. Not treating it like an illness is a good start.

    The next step is acknowledging our existence. I do want people to change what they say. I want schools to mention the fact that not everyone feels sexual attraction and many people feel attraction very rarely. Then say that many people don't want sex ever. And basically acknowledge that asexuals aren't unicorns or little children. Putting it bluntly, I want inclusive sex education. I was never taught about how lesbian couples could prevent STD transmission. This obviously doesn't effect me, but it is a good sign of how broken sex ed is in schools at the moment.

    I live in this world. Which is why I want things to change. It is not acceptable to insult a gay person's sexual orientation, so why is it acceptable to insult an asexuals? Because when you call us special snowflakes that is what you are doing.

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    Got any proof to back that up as everyone has known of gays etc since the dawn of time (think of the Greek and Romans), but no culture mentions "asexual" people. Why is that?
    Also to not feel any attraction would be a actual medical issue due to a lack of hormones etc, but this would also show physically. So again, why is this not the case?

    Sex ed overall is ****. It never explains anything about relationships etc and is far to clinical and limited. But frankly I think that is for families and societies to deal with, not the classroom.
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    Got any proof to back that up as everyone has known of gays etc since the dawn of time (think of the Greek and Romans), but no culture mentions "asexual" people. Why is that?
    Also to not feel any attraction would be a actual medical issue due to a lack of hormones etc, but this would also sho physically. So again, why is this not the case?

    Sex ed overall is ****. It never explains anything about relationships etc and is far to clinical and limited. But frankly I think that is for families and societies to deal with, not the classroom.
    We have always existed. We just go largely unnoticed. Plato described an ideal of love that is asexual, so yes we are mentioned. Think of people like monks and nuns. A great many of those were asexual. We are often ignored because our orientation is invisible. We are defined by a lack of wanting to do something. We often fly under the radar.

    Asexuality is not an illness and it is not related to hormones. My hormones are fine. Again, telling asexual people that it is to do with their hormones is really offensive. It isn't to do with hormones, it is predominantly genetic. In and of itself, asexuality has no negative impact on the individual. The negative impact is from the sense of marginalisation from society.

    How can families educate their children about different orientations when they don't know themselves? Also, how can you expect a straight couple to educate a child on STD prevention for lesbians when they probably won't have any experience of it? Including one orientation but not all the rest is discriminatory. It makes people who don't feel like that think they're freaks for being who they are. It is absolutely the job of schools to teach sex ed properly.
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    (Original post by Katty3)

    Asexuality is not an illness and it is not related to hormones. My hormones are fine. Again, telling asexual people that it is to do with their hormones is really offensive.
    Do you just look for things to find offensive? Is is part of your condition?

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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Do you just look for things to find offensive? Is is part of your condition?

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    Do you mean my sexual orientation? No. I don't look for offensive things. You just happen to keep writing a list of things not to say to an asexual person. Implying that an orientation is an illness is one of those things. Would you do the same to a gay person? No? Don't do it to an asexual then. Quite simple.

    No rebuttal to my second point?

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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    No my dear, your condition is being an SJW.

    Your second point I have no interest in and it was not replying to me. I only picked out the part I thought was funny.

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    You know I actually believe what I say. Not liking being insulted because of my sexuality, and being told to get my hormone levels checked is quite reasonable.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    You know I actually believe what I say. Not liking being insulted because of my sexuality, and being told to get my hormone levels checked is quite reasonable.

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    So being called a snowflake is deeply offensive?

    You need thicker skin if you are ever going to make it in this world.

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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    So being called a snowflake is deeply offensive?

    You need thicker skin if you are ever going to make it in this world.

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    Yes, actually. It isn't so much the word, it's what it means. Calling me a special snowflake means that I'm making up my sexuality to try to be special. I'm not. I genuinely feel no sexual attraction to anybody at any time. There is a word for my orientation. I identify as asexual. Saying that it doesn't count because you have never heard of it is offensive. This is why I object to being called a special snowflake.

    Make it as what? My dream is to become an early years teacher.

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    If you're not attractived to men, you're not gay. Gay sex(ual activity) doesn't make you gay technically. That said, I dunno why you'd let a guy grind on you then effectively *** to you if you weren't attracted to him lol.

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